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KH, Rest In Peace Brother
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A buddy lost 2nd gear in his R1, how hard of a fix is this or should it be taken to the dealer to fix it? BTW it's a 2001. Any help??
 

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King of Oilernation
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If it was me I would take it in. I don't think it is rocket science to pull the tranny out, but working on it after it is pulled and then putting it all back together could prove daunting. Hopefully it is just a problem with the linkage, but the possibilities are unfortunately too numerous to list.
 

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KH, Rest In Peace Brother
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
He was told the 2nd gear forks were bent??? Not sure what the hell that means. All other gears shift fine, currently he just by passes 2nd and goes into 3rd but he wants to get it back to the way it is supposed to be.
 

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King of Oilernation
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I'm not sure either. Never heard of "forks" in the transmission. Maybe someone with more knowledge will read this thread and chime in. I'm assuming if Yamaha's use gear forks, then all the other use them as well. Only other suggestion is to check the service manual if he has one. I just ordered a service manual on Ebay and it should be here anyday, so I'll check if any of the parts breakdowns mention forks.
 

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second chimp in space
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Tranny needs to be taken apart to replace those. Not an easy fix.
 

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A few hundred in parts and between 20-30 hours of labor for the mechanically inclined do-it-yourselfer. Will need replacement of the the shift dog engaging 2nd gear. If brought into a dealer, about $2500-3000 could be the total bill.
 

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Kawpuke Extraordinare!
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It shouldn't take 20-30 hours in labor. 10-12 hours or so.. One does have to take the engine out and split the cases however. The shift forks are what slides the gears back and forth on the input and output shafts. They get worn where they ride in the grooves in the gears, and can get bent as well. Also the gears themselves where they lock together with each other will wear. The grooves and engagement dogs will round off and then the gears will kick out of engagement and slip by each other. Only way to cure is to replace the worn,damaged gears and worn/damage shift forks. Usually 2 gears and 3 shift forks and poss the shift drum if its worn as well. Figure at least 500 for parts. I dont like re-using main bearings if I split cases so I would replace those as well. Gonna need oil pan gasket and engine cover gaskets as well..


And here is a picture of the shift forks
 

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ZXLNT said:
It shouldn't take 20-30 hours in labor. 10-12 hours or so..
Just relaying the average range of man hours it took for the average DIYer who has reported doing the job. The actual range was 15-36 hours. Cost range was 250-500$
 

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You mentioned that the shift forks slide the gears back and forth on the input and output shafts, which is correct for an automotive type transmission, but our bikes use a constant mesh type transmission. The gears remain meshed at all times, and the shift dogs engage and disengage the various gear combinations.
 

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KH, Rest In Peace Brother
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
damn....may tell him he is frucked and intro him to his next track bike!!...:lol
 

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Kawpuke Extraordinare!
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Eyespy said:
You mentioned that the shift forks slide the gears back and forth on the input and output shafts, which is correct for an automotive type transmission, but our bikes use a constant mesh type transmission. The gears remain meshed at all times, and the shift dogs engage and disengage the various gear combinations.
The gears still slide back and forth on the shafts. So what I said is correct.

The gear slides one direction to engage one gear combination and slides the opposite direction to engage a different gear set. That how the different gear combinations get selected by the gears moving on the shaft being slid back and forth. Thats why the shift forks get worn from pressing on grooves in the gears.
 

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You will be missed Shawn
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not to mention the fact that is is quite common for it to happen to R1's. !st gear to 2nd gear is the longest throw hence the reason it is most likely to go out,
 

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ZXLNT said:
The gears still slide back and forth on the shafts. So what I said is correct.

The gear slides one direction to engage one gear combination and slides the opposite direction to engage a different gear set. That how the different gear combinations get selected by the gears moving on the shaft being slid back and forth. Thats why the shift forks get worn from pressing on grooves in the gears.
The gears don't slide back and forth on the shafts, the collars (shift dogs) do.
 

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Kawpuke Extraordinare!
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Dude your playing semantics plain and simple. Its a gear it has teeth on the outside and slots or engagement dogs on the flat sides. Even the microfiche are calling them gears.

Quit trying to pick apart my posts with your wording.

They are gears, they have teeth. They slide back and forth and engage with each other. It pretty simple no need to make it anymore complicated for anyone..
 

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King of Oilernation
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On a lighter note, thank you guys who know a lot more than I do about the subject. I've learned quite a bit and appreciate your time in explaining what went wrong.
 

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ZXLNT said:
Dude your playing semantics plain and simple. Its a gear it has teeth on the outside and slots or engagement dogs on the flat sides. Even the microfiche are calling them gears.

Quit trying to pick apart my posts with your wording.

They are gears, they have teeth. They slide back and forth and engage with each other. It pretty simple no need to make it anymore complicated for anyone..
Excuse me, dude. But there is a difference. The gears stay meshed at all times. The shift dogs are not the gears, they are the collars, and they are what engage and disengage with the gears, that stay engaged (LOL), as they slide back and forth. I think anyone with half a brain could see this is a difference from a non-sequential transmission where the gears themselves mesh and unmesh. Sheesh... Take a valium, I wasn't trying to pick you apart, just injecting a more accurate detail or two for anyone's possible interest or benefit. Have a :cheers and chill. LOL
 

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YammyR1 said:
On a lighter note, thank you guys who know a lot more than I do about the subject. I've learned quite a bit and appreciate your time in explaining what went wrong.
Well, if by any remote chance that includes me, you're welcome.
 

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RESIDENT ASSHOLE
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Eyespy said:
Excuse me, dude. But there is a difference. The gears stay meshed at all times. The shift dogs are not the gears, they are the collars, and they are what engage and disengage with the gears, that stay engaged (LOL), as they slide back and forth. I think anyone with half a brain could see this is a difference from a non-sequential transmission where the gears themselves mesh and unmesh. Sheesh... Take a valium, I wasn't trying to pick you apart, just injecting a more accurate detail or two for anyone's possible interest or benefit. Have a :cheers and chill. LOL
This thread cracks me up!

The gear does in fact slide on the transmission shaft. It moves laterally to engage the next out put gear on the output shaft or vice versa. Dont try to make a statement that is nothing more than car jumbo mixed into it. Cars dont normally come with sequential shift patterns.
 
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