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The 250cc Yamaha has been a long time coming, and after countless days of speculation, rumors and sketches, the real deal was finally revealed to the world in concept form at the last Tokyo Motor Show.

Called the Yamaha YZF-R25 – making it the YZF-R125's elder sibling – the new 250cc Yamaha is styled to look similar like Jorge Lorenzo's MotoGP bike, the Yamaha YZR-M1, and the engine too makes its inspiration from Yamaha's motorcycle racing exploits.

The Yamaha 250cc engine is a parallel-twin developing an unspecified amount of power, but it will be a engine that revs like crazy, for certain. We expect power to be in the region of 35 ~ 40 horsepower, and the Yamaha YZF-R25 will likely have excellent corner-carving abilities.

http://www.motorcycle.in.th/article.php/The-Yamaha-YZF-R25_35to40-Horsepower



Looks like a fun little bike!
 

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Very interesting. I wonder how the quality of the suspension and brakes compare to the KTM RC390. I also wonder if it's coming to the US...
 

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Countless forums have discussed the major manufacturers (other than Kawi) bringing these 125, 250 and 500 models for years. It's nice to see it becoming a reality.
 

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After Me Lucky Charms
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"We expect 35-40hp".

Yamaha's official Facebook says "30hp or so".

So...just a rumor.
 

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After Me Lucky Charms
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I know Triumph is also working on a 250.

I think it is a good idea with how many countries require people to start small. For the US it is probably pointless, since most people think they need a 600+
 

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After Me Lucky Charms
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I know Triumph is also working on a 250.

I think it is a good idea with how many countries require people to start small. For the US it is probably pointless, since most people think they need a 600+
In Canada at least, I have noticed a bit of a trend to lighter, less powerful bikes. the ninja 250 is impossible to keep on dealership floors, especially since it's redesign in 07. the smaller , under 500CC/70hp bikes are quick movers it seems.

I point a ton to marketing and tougher penalties on speeding, and more training available. 10 years ago there were no MSF style courses in Saskatchewan, for instance. now, there are 4 companies (1 in each major city) which offer 3 day training courses on either Honda Shadows or CBR125s. These courses teach and preach the benefits of lighter weight and less power. This, combined with 1 new racetrack in alberta, and plans for 2 new ones in this province, hopefully mean more people will take the plunge and see that honing it up on the street is way less fun than laying down rubber on a track.

Couple those things with penalties as stiff as roadside suspension, 4 digit fine, and impound if you are radar'd going more than 50km over the speed limit, PLUS fuel and insurance prices being high (seriously, 2 grand a year for basic coverage on my f4i) and it's easy to see why people choose the smaller bikes.

Not all insurance changes are bad things either. While I very much dislike the insurance company used here, they have suggested as much as a 20% rate decrease if you take a yearly MSF style course (beginner, intermediate, or advanced), a 10-15% discount if you license with full coverage from april to November, and incremental discounts for wearing more gear, but no penalties for wearing less. Incentive over punishment. What they have NOT done, is educate the cage driving public about bikes well enough, and that is their major downfall. they are busy educating the people who are by and large not at fault for the accidents they are involved in.

those kinds of things push the small bike market without legislation. The only thing I dislike is that some people are pushing for mandatory gear. I wear my iron man suit because I want to, not because I have to.
 
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I wonder why they made a new motor for this bike. That's the same power range as the wr250 motor, which is bullet proof, great mileage, and low on vibes. Would also be lighter and narrower. Could the twin be cheaper to somehow?
 

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A guy on a scruffy bike
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I wonder why they made a new motor for this bike. That's the same power range as the wr250 motor, which is bullet proof, great mileage, and low on vibes. Would also be lighter and narrower. Could the twin be cheaper to somehow?
Dirt bikes typically have maintenance requirements that are totally unacceptable for a road bike.

PhilB
 

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Dirt bikes typically have maintenance requirements that are totally unacceptable for a road bike.

PhilB
3k mile oil changes and 26k valve checks. I meant the street legal wr250r and wr250x. They get confusing with ttheir naming. Wr250 was indeed a pure dirt bike with a yz based motor like the wr450. But the R and X are heavier street oriented motors loosely based on the R1 as a single cylinder
 

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3k mile oil changes and 26k valve checks. I meant the street legal wr250r and wr250x. They get confusing with ttheir naming. Wr250 was indeed a pure dirt bike with a yz based motor like the wr450. But the R and X are heavier street oriented motors loosely based on the R1 as a single cylinder
OK, then, Your question is valid, and I don't know the answer. Maybe they felt they needed a new design to meet current and future noise/emissions/whatever regulations in all the countries they want to use that engine in?

PhilB
 
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