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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
'Sup SBN,

This is my first riding season and I've already noticed the effects the colder climate has on tires. About 2-3 minutes into my ride a sudden yellow light caught me off guard and I was forced to (gently) jab my rear brake. To my surprise the bike fishtailed like never before. It was all in a controlled manner and it didn't spook me whatsoever but it was definitely something I did not expect.

Granted, the time to change tires is coming up but it was definitely the result of cold tires & cold road. Since last week I've been taking turns at a much slower rate.

Beside cold tires and ice, is there anything else I should be weary of when commuting in sub 40 degree temperatures?

Thanks!
 

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If the light has been green for a while, it's time start planning on it turning yellow and then red. Part of learning to ride on the streets is learning about more than just controlling the bike and watching out for cagers.

You need to starting looking and watch what is going on 12 to 15 seconds in front of you.
 

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Frostbite and hypothermia might bear some passing consideration.
I agree, make sure you have proper riding gear before you set out. If you have a backpack or tailbag you can err on the side of warm. You can always put on something stored in the tailbag or backpack, but I'd rather take something off because I'm too warm then have to put something on because I'm shivering.

Also, watch out for sandy roads after a snow or ice storm, as well as leaves for the remainder of the fall months.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If the light has been green for a while, it's time start planning on it turning yellow and then red. Part of learning to ride on the streets is learning about more than just controlling the bike and watching out for cagers.

You need to starting looking and watch what is going on 12 to 15 seconds in front of you.
haha, thanks man. I have over 150,000 miles of driving experience at a young age of 24. Sometimes an unfamiliar traffic light sneaks up with a yellow.
 

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It was 29 when I left the house today. I was layered up really good on my legs and torso, but only under amour running gloves under my teknic racing gauntlets. I need heated gloves. I felt totally comfortable except for painfully cold fingers.
 

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I used to ride in the snow and ice , but have finally given it up . The rotator cuff injury and double knee bustification have taken their toll . Its the van if its bad out this year . Best mod you can do to the bike is some heated grips . Best clothing is good base layer , a good air trapping thermal layer. You want to be snug but not tight ,its the air you trap that keeps you warm , then wind and waterproof outerlayer , Rukka being about the best despite the hassle of the zip system they are very good , should keep you warm in -20C or worse . Best mod to riding style is go at 50% or less yeeehaawws than you normally would .
 

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i ride all year long in NY. as long as theres no snow or rain im out. in the winter you better layer up. as for warming up the bike and tires before you do anything crazy, its a MUST. and also if you have a weak battery you might want to get a new one. just the other day i had to push start my bike because my battery died in the cold.
 

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Best mod to riding style is go at 50% or less yeeehaawws than you normally would .
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"yeeehaawws" lol, cracked me up man!

I've ridden on some pretty cold mornings so far up here in WI. The only things I have had problems keeping warm are my hands and the bottom of my chin from the wind under my helmet.

Figure some proper winter riding gloves, heated grips, and a face mask or balaclava type piece of gear would do it. Don't want to drive after the snow starts falling, but I'd like to up to that point in the future.
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Hmmmm. Good point, tire chains? No idea what im gonna do. Pray for no snow.


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Its when you get to really work them inner thighs using the outr***** style of riding . I used to end up with groin strains every year from it . The worst I ever got caught in was coming home from work in Scotland ,by the time I had climbed out the city into the hills I was paddling a GPZ900 through a foot of snow and still had the worst hill to do . It was hard going ,but I made it without dropping the bike .
 

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Rear Brake??

Wondering why you would jab the rear brake? The front has amazing stopping power...

Not trying to be a dick but I can honestly say the rear brake on my bike is never used.
 

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When you face sketchy traction situations like gravel on roads, ice, sand, etc. you don't want to apply too much of the front brake as it will lock up the front tire much much easier. That's why I use a lot more rear brake when I think it's going to be slick out.

Lock up the front and it's a pretty safe bet that you're going down. Lock up the back? No big deal.

Of course, The real answer is to just slow down and start braking sooner and apply less brake than you normally would.
 

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Keep practicing the gentle application of rear brake. Front is king most of the time but come winter between inclement weather and cold tires really modulating the rear brake is really important.

Everything slows down... People aren't paying attention for bikes and you need to give yourself move to maneuver.
 
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