Sport Bikes banner

1 - 20 of 48 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Why is riding a 600cc bike harder than a 250cc? Is it physiclly b***** or is it just the engine size? If its just engine size then could i start with a 600cc bike then add a throttle limiter if they make one so i couldnt get killed when i have the need for speed?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,687 Posts
because your eyeballs will fall out....:2eek
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,328 Posts
Long stroy short, its less forgiving. The 600cc bikes are race bikes with lights and signals.

Reasons why the 250 is a better starter bike:

1. Less power to get into trouble with.

2. Less powerful brakes to get into trouble with

3. More upright seating position is more natural and easier to control then a pure racing position.

4. There's probably more, but the drink runneth loweth! :beer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
This is MY opinion only, and there are plenty of experienced riders that will disagree and still say start with a 250/500.

If you want to ride a bike for the freedom of riding, the control and just for the fun of it then I think a 600 is ok to start with. A 250/500 is still BETTER because you will learn more on it before moving up.

If you want to ride a bike to go fast, impress chicks, show off or because all your friends have 600+ bikes, then you shouldn't get one. You're going to hurt yourself. Be honest with yourself man, if you are lying to yourself about your reasons you're not the only one who gets hurt... family, friends innocent pedestrians.... ect.

I'm starting on a 600, but I am in a unique situation:

No traffic in my area, I can stay off the highway and on back roads and never have more than 1-2 cars going the same way with me within sight. I'm older, have put half a million miles in a cage in every driving situation possible, and my bike is somewhat "detuned" from a true SS 600. My size also plays a factor, 6'3" and about 230. Not comfy on a little bike.

I wish I had a little 250 to play with, and in truth I might go buy one in a few months. In the end its up to you bro, only you know if you can trust yourself enough to start big and show a lot of slef-control, or if you want to start small and have some fun.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,687 Posts
tell that size thing to the guy on here who is like 6'6" and 300 lbs!
 

·
Aνθρωπος μ
Joined
·
1,409 Posts
Power delivery, brakes, weight; I'm sure there are tons more. Starting on a 250 can still kill you in no time, but if you screw up (maybe give it to much throttle going into a turn or something) you have less of a chance of wiping out. I've made a shitload of mistakes (and don't say it won't happen to you; when I learned to ride the instructors said I was probably the fastest learner they'd ever taught) and I'm sure a couple of them would have had me on the pavement if my bike had more guts. The 250 (old one) looks ugly but if it's not fast enough to put a smile on your face, you probably care more for posing than riding.
 

·
Old school fool
1994 CB 1000
Joined
·
5,725 Posts
The first thing you need to know is that there is an inherent risk in riding ANY bike, big or little. Starting small does not provide you with some cloak of invincibilty that wil prevent you from being killed or maimed, and startig big doesn not mean that you are 100 percent sure to be. So why do I tell people to start small, then?

First, its the advice that makes the most sense for the most people. Riding a motorcycle is a skill, like skiing or swimming. You have to learn how to do it and that takes time. Once you learn the basics, it takes even more time to go from simple proficiency to real ability. Survival, by the way, doesn't equal ability.

When you learn to swim, most people don't start by jumping into the deep end, when you learn to ski, most people don't start on the advanced slope. Why should a person think they should jump onto a powerful bike and expect to start learning there? I'm sure there are people who can learn any skill by starting at the expert level, but it doesn't sound safe to me, so I don't recommend it.

Second, higher power equals higher speed. Higher speed means worse injuries in the event of a crash. Sure, not everyone crashes at full speed but it seems to me if you buy a balls on bike, sooner or later you're going to see what it can do.

Third, racers are expensive to crash. Thats true of 250 racers too, but more so with 600s. Again, when I'm recomending a bike to a new person, I consider that in the equation which is why I almost always recommend a used bike.

Here's the thing - I give out advice for free on the internet. Unlike some people who post in these threads, I have a couple of decades of on-road riding experience to back that advice up. I am serious about what I tell to new riders and am happy to tell people I've never met the same things that I would tell my own niece or nephew if they were buying a bike for the first time. Furthermore, even though I don't have anything at stake, I am disappointed when people don't listen to the advice I give; it makes me wonder why I bother sometimes.

Age has finally given me some perspective. Riding a motorcycle is dangerous damn business and safety needs to be taken seriously. Riders face all kinds of risks out there - traffic, road conditions, weather conditions, animals - things that a car driver could just shrug off with some lost paint and some dented fenders can be fatal for a rider. A rider doesn't need to add to that list by pairing up a high powered bike intended for an experienced rider with inexperience.

Of course I realize that everyone is a special case and doesn't really need to follow the advice I give out. That's fine too. I enjoy reading the close call stories and looking at photos of a person's ass so rashed up that they are probably learning to sleep on their stomach. I also like it when people post back years later and tell me how wrong my advice is (well, I would if that ever happened) and I wonder about people when they suddenly stop making 5 or 6 posts a day and never post agan...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The reason why i want a 600 bike is because i cant find any nice looking 250 or 500 bikes but found plenty of nice looking 600 bikes. I am the type of guy that cant ride around on a bike that i dont like. If they made nice lookin 250 bikes just like the 600 then that's what i would rather get.
 

·
Old school fool
1994 CB 1000
Joined
·
5,725 Posts
Don't get too hung up over how a bike looks. You can't tell what you are riding when you are on it. Besides, there is no love like your first love and there will come a day that you pine for the piece of junk you started out on.

What an ugly or old bike tells other riders is that you are serious about the sport. Its amazing how much attention an old beater gets from experienced riders. We remember those bikes from when they were new and a lot of us owned them when we were starting out too. I almost always stop and talk to a guy with an old bike, its interesting. What am I going to say to the guy with the R6 on bike night? "Oh, nice R6 that's identical to the 200 other ones lined up over there. Tell me about it."

When you ride an older bike and start small, there's a bond with other riders that you won't get if you are a new guy with the hottest bike in the parking lot, paddling around with both feet, slipping the clutch too much to start and jerking your brakes when you stop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If the dealer could keep half of the power then i would give it to them in a heartbeat, cause you are right i am the type of person that sooner or later i am going to see what this bike can do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If the 250 ninja really looks like that then ninja it is and with a price tage of only $3500 then i would be on one in no time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Look for used 08 ninjas too. The Kawi shop I go to in Jax can't keep them in stock because people just walk in looking and end up walking out with one... these are people who will turn around a month later and want to get rid of it because they never put any thought into riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Ok didnt read this post to be honest. But at the expense of myself I will put my 2 cents in. I have a 600 (hence then screen name) and I am a rookie, noob and whatever else you wanna call me. A friend did it the much better way and got a 250 ninja. I am still going slow as hell trying to get used to this 600 while my friend has picked it up and is able to out ride me any day of the week! We took off at a light and he beat me by a hell of alot bc he is much more comfortable on his 250 then I am on my 600. This might not be the case for everyone but I am regeting my choice :( Hope that helps alittle in ur decision. I honestly wish I had gone with a 250!!!!!
 

·
Aνθρωπος μ
Joined
·
1,409 Posts
If the 250 ninja really looks like that then ninja it is and with a price tage of only $3500 then i would be on one in no time.
Yes, that is what the 250 looks like. It does have an MSRP of $3500, problem is the demand is so high a lot of dealers are marking them up. I don't know the price in your area, but if you wanted one around me (NY), you'd be lucky to get one for like $5000. If you could get one.

But I'd definitely go to your local dealer and ask them about reserving one from their next shipment. Maybe find a dealer that's in a smaller town (less demand) that's not too far from your town/city.
 

·
Just Kiss The Tip
Joined
·
3,017 Posts
Here is a simple analogy...

You go buy your first nintendo game circa the 90's

You put in a cheat code to skip right to the final level. You play the game and get lucky enough to beat it once. Does that make you master of the game? By all means you've beaten the last and final level!

Well in actuality the game was meant to be played in a sequential series and you gain certain skills with each level that prepare you for the final level. Skipping right to the end just means that you by chance managed to finish the level but really gained no other skill in the game, except you got lucky and made it to the end...

AND if that does not do it for you....

A b***** bike is more performance oriented than a smaller non race ready bike. It's very sensitive to rider input. It's not that they are HARDER to ride. If you have the skill it will probably be EASIER to ride, it's just that they are HARDER for one skill lacking to ride because you have no experience in what to input and how it will respond when you input a function to your ride.

That and the fact that they are more expensive to maintain than a smaller bike, insurance is higher than on a smaller bike, and etc.

Do not think they are harder to ride than a smaller bike. They are WAY more sophisticated in terms of technology...they are just harder for new riders to ride.

If you have ever put together a leggo set...

Toddlers start off with the leggos that are huge, and just have either two or three points to fit. As you get older you get smaller pieces to play with and they have more fitting points. If you parents love you then one day you get leggos that you attach batteries and moving parts and blinking parts to them as well....Now can a toddler put together battery assemblies and wire lights to their legos....NO UNLESS THEIR NAME IS VALENTINO ROSSI...and even he started out with the big, clunky two pronged LEGOS

PS I know I spelled Legos wrong my whole post until the end. Too Lazy to go back and correct....
 

·
Just Kiss The Tip
Joined
·
3,017 Posts
Don't get too hung up over how a bike looks. You can't tell what you are riding when you are on it. Besides, there is no love like your first love and there will come a day that you pine for the piece of junk you started out on.

What an ugly or old bike tells other riders is that you are serious about the sport. Its amazing how much attention an old beater gets from experienced riders. We remember those bikes from when they were new and a lot of us owned them when we were starting out too. I almost always stop and talk to a guy with an old bike, its interesting. What am I going to say to the guy with the R6 on bike night? "Oh, nice R6 that's identical to the 200 other ones lined up over there. Tell me about it."

When you ride an older bike and start small, there's a bond with other riders that you won't get if you are a new guy with the hottest bike in the parking lot, paddling around with both feet, slipping the clutch too much to start and jerking your brakes when you stop.
Hey what's wrong with slipping the clutch? It's an integral part of controlling your bike in slow speed maneuvers...plus I like the way the engine sounds when you start off slipping the clutch just as much as I do when you are able to WOT. It's the same effect when your woman is begging you to be inside of her...that heightened sense of arousal right before intercourse...the engine whines just a little bit before you can let it go all the way...I like that about bikes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
I never regretted my choice of starting out on my 98 cbr 600 f3 but that is just ME. Im not saying that I am anyone special or anything. I really wanted an 03+ SV650 but i couldnt afford one. Anyways, when people ask me what bike to start on I usually say " I dont know" because I believe personality/responsibility/maturity has a lot to do with it. I know guys who I wouldnt even recommend a 250 to because they lack maturity and the FIRST thing they would do is hop on it and try to clutch it up to impress someone. Just be smart and be as careful. Also, find some GOOD people to ride with. I can not stress how much I have learned from guys/girls that have ridden for many many years.
 
1 - 20 of 48 Posts
Top