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You got that right.
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Okay, first experience last month was when it was raining! So combine rain with grooved pavement, yeah you get the idea. Some white-knucked riding and some really sore hands!

Anyway, thanks for the info on my Rainy Weather Best Practices thread. What's everybody's technique for riding in grooved pavement areas?

MSF told me to get up a little on the pegs, no sudden movements, shifts, breaks or accelerations; and basically let the grooves pull the bike a little and try not to fight it. What does everybody else do?
 

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I ride grooved pavement the same way as any other time. It feels a little different, a little bit like my back end is sliding around but really nothing bad is gonna happen unless you're riding crazy.
 

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Yep,what he said.

Go with the flow,your bike is a lot smater than you think it is and can handle pretty much anything the road can dish out so long as you relax and let it do it's job.
 

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Keeping WI HOT since 1998
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Yeah, drawbridges that open up suck too. A lot worse than groovy concrete. They make you feel really wobbly. Rode over my first one this past week.
 

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old member
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Yep, grooved pavement can be nerve wracking. Stay loose and let the bike/tires find their path. There was a popular m/c road up in the hills that was prepped to be resurfaced with deep grooves about 2" wide on long stretches. That was horrible as either your front or rear wheel were subject to 2" steps to either side at any moment. They left that road in that condition for months before finally finishing the resurfacing. We all thought it was done on purpose to punish us.

Other scary surfaces include anything metal or painted in the rain. Slick as heck.
 

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Old school fool
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RayOSV said:
Other scary surfaces include anything metal or painted in the rain. Slick as heck.
Oh yeah, I agree with that. This even includes the metal plates they use on expansion joints. Be really careful on those things when the road curves - they are easy to overlook because they are so small but that little bit of slick wet metal is all it takes to knock you down.
 

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After you get used to the feeling, it's not a problem. Just don't tense up on the bars and have a loose grip. Let the bike do it's thing.

Around where I live there are rain groves for a lot of turns so I end up riding over them at least once if I'm going somewhere. It just takes getting used to the akward feeling. It won't cause you to go down.
 

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yeah my township has been re-paving all the roads due to winter. I acutally ended up on a half my stretch of it the other week. Bike feels very wobbly but as long as you don't give it too much input and try to weave and dodge stuff the bike will stay up. On my way back I tried avoiding that road and taking a different road and ran into another grooved pavement.

I'm a newbie so when i come up on grooved pavement, I usually just go a little slower than the speed limit. Other cars should understand that the road isn't perfect. Plus if i have to go down, may it be at slower speeds.
 

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Are we not men?
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You really need to relax in any situation like that. If you tense up, you'll actually be fighting the bike. The steering geometry will try to correct itsself as long (to a point) as long as you don't give unnecessary input, which will happen when you're tense. Squeezing the tank with your knees and taking all weight off your hands will give you a good feel for what the bike is doing. Plus that will center your weight on the bike better.
 

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killahant said:
wayy off topic. I crack up everytime i see the picture under your name. What is going on there? Are you in a frat?


You'll get used to grooves. I've only ridden on them a handful of times myself but it was never anything to worry about in my mind. 1 thing i am scared of though is when half the lane is paved or just uneven. My bike road on one last night and it caught me off gaurd. I didnt freak out but i felt the bike start to move on its on. Looked at the ground and noticed the groove my tire was riding along, I slowly moved away.

Correct me if I'm wrong anyone but when unexpected stuff happens dont freak out, relax and plan your next move. Thats actually how i live my whole life. I think the guys that sayed "dont tense up" were right.
 

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yea groved sux especially around the corner...keep the grip on the handle bars loos and squeezing the gas tank with your legs seems to help stabilize the bike during the shakes...
 

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F-You and Yourspace!
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SnookayDCC said:
wayy off topic. I crack up everytime i see the picture under your name. What is going on there? Are you in a frat?
It's called "Edward 40 hands" it's a great college party passtime.
 

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seppuku said:
After you get used to the feeling, it's not a problem. Just don't tense up on the bars and have a loose grip. Let the bike do it's thing.

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+1

If you have 'white knuckles' you are making the situation much worse. You should hold the clip ons as tight as if you had a baby bird in your hands. Any tighter and you are not letting the bikes suspension work propperly. The bike may 'wobble' a bit, but it will get you through it. When in doubt, trust the bike. It will do alot better job than you will. :)
 
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