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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't understand this. I recently had my tires on my vehicle replaced. I bought 4 Bridgestone Dueler Revos + labor + tax comes up to about $710. That's $177/ea for the top of the line SUV tires, mounted, balanced and with free lifetime balancing for the life of the tire.

I look online and Pilot Powers range from $112 to $200. Parts411.com has the 190/55 for $177 and that's just the tires.

The reason I'm bitching is that it's about that time to change my rear tire and I'm shopping around for tires.
 

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Get ones that last longer for starters, instead of all out performance. I'm willing to bet you don't own a sportscar that you equip with near track worthy tires, or you'd quickly realize the $ isn't too far off proportionally. Now it is true you can get a good street tire for pretty cheap, relatively speaking, but cars destroy expensive race/street tires quicly too.

My guess is they are more carefully built, use higher grade materials, and are much less mass produced in regards to their high cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
These are stock tires. I wasn't expecting them to last longer than 5k miles. I unfortunately do not own a sports car, but I did have some low profile Pirelli P7000 in my younger days. 40k miles was how long it lasted, cost me $140 a tire.

I'm not bitching at how long the tires last, I'm just wondering why the cost of a bike tire is so much more than a car tire.
 

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I had Z rated on my twin turbo stealth. IIRC the tires were aboot $300 a piece. And they only last 25k miles. This was 13 years ago.
 

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bike tires have to meet different demands, also, car tires are produced in incredible numbers compared to bike tires which affords them a huge economic scale benefit. Motorcycles are about 1% of the registered vehicles on the road. Sorta like buying a hand made t-shirt for 50 dollars when you can get the same shirt mass produced elsewhere for $5.
 

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Shake 'N Bake
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If you shop around you can find tires for a reasonable price. Honestly I dont really see a problem with the price of tires except the mileage you get out of them is nothing compared to car tires. But then again being in this sport means you have to deal with the price of it.
 

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scatterbrained said:
bike tires have to meet different demands, also, car tires are produced in incredible numbers compared to bike tires which affords them a huge economic scale benefit. Motorcycles are about 1% of the registered vehicles on the road. Sorta like buying a hand made t-shirt for 50 dollars when you can get the same shirt mass produced elsewhere for $5.

^And the hand made t shirt is MUCH more sticky than the mass produced t shirt:lol
 

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Czolgosz said:
Where are you buying your shirts? :eek:nfloor
Awwww, man, how could I have been so dense. Ya know, I always thought usedcumrags.com was a strange name for a clothing business, but now I know the awful truth.

So if you'll excuse me, I think I need to go clean myself off... with a belt sander.
 

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Nostradumbass said:
Awwww, man, how could I have been so dense. Ya know, I always thought usedcumrags.com was a strange name for a clothing business, but now I know the awful truth.

So if you'll excuse me, I think I need to go clean myself off... with a belt sander.
:lao :eek:nfloor
Wow just wow.
 

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Michelin Pilot Sport car tires in 245/17 to 275/17 (common sizes fitted to modern sport cars, roughly like 180/17 and 190/17 for sport bikes) cost $200-300 from internet tire stores like TireRack. Not significantly different considering the additional materials. The primary reason you get less mileage from the bike tire is that the tread depth is less to start with (car standard is 10/32, about 7mm), and the fact that cars distribute the wear over a much larger surface.

KeS
 

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Go look at the prices for R compound car tires and you will quickly realize how close the price is. Bike tires aren't exactly normal car compounds in them especially something like Pilot Powers. I have AA rated tires on my wheels (I think can't remember the tread ratings) on my car and they last no more than 15k before I should replace them.
 

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Any way that you look at it, you can't compare car tires to motorcycle tires. Different engineering, different technology. Sure both offer grip to the road, and you can buy sticky tires, or economic tires, but I believe that motorcycle tires are made a lot differently than regular tires. This is because only two tires hold us to the ground and have to go through a range of motion during leans and such, where as a car has 4 tires to stick to the road, and they're built to only ride on the top portion of the tire where the tread is.

Just think about this:

Sportscar tires with sticky compound will last you 20k-25k at the most if you drive normally with the occasional spirited run. These run about 180$ per tire (not even the best compound either), not including mount and balance. $720 for 20k miles.

Motorcycle tires with sticky compound will last you about 3k-8k (yes, I said 8k because I have Qualifiers on right now with almost 8k and they're not even to the wear bars yet). It all depends on how you set it up. I run max psi in the rear tire (42 psi) because I commute daily and do the occasional canyon run on the weekends. These tires cost about $250 for a set ($110 for front, $140 for rear), and you only have to change the front one per 2 rear tires. Roughly 2 fronts and 4 rears for 20k miles. This means $760 for 20k miles.

I'd rather pay $40 extra for motorcycle tires because I know that I'd be having more fun on a motorcycle than in a sports car.. and yes I have owned a Sports Car (Subaru WRX STi).
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the info, guys. I'll keep looking around. I'll be visiting my dealership this weekend. Maybe I could get them to quote a price for tires. They are a little expensive compared to buying online but if you take into consideration shipping, it's not that much more. I've bought parts and accessories from them before.
 

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From the sounds of it, you won't be doing it yourself. Don't forget to get a price for mounting/balancing the tires from the dealer (loose wheels or still attached to the bike).

I think sportbiketrackgear is offering free shipping on tires. And they are having a sale right now...
 

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I've often felt that bike tires were a dirty little secret and really effect the cost of ownership for bikes especially if you ride more than a few thousand miles a year. Over time you'll figure out what kind of tires you can live with, where to buy them, and where to get them mounted/balanced. Sales at Cycle Gear usually work for me. YMMV
 

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I think that there's a common misconception that Bikes are cheaper to own than Cars. While gas mileage may be great on a Bike compared to a car, I think that if you don't set things up right, the costs will be about the same, or even more than a car.

The upkeep on a bike is huge: tires, chain, sprockets, valve clearance checks, etc etc all cost money. While you have to do maintenance on a car, you don't have to do it as much (longer service intervals). Oil is the same for both.

I ride 1000 miles a week commuting back and forth to school and work. As a college student, I have to make sure that I can budget my money well to last me as I try NOT to live paycheck to paycheck, but it sometimes turns out that way. Steel sprockets, long lasting chain, regularly cleaned and adjusted, touring tires, high PSI in tires, cheap but good oil.. these are all things that I must do regularly to keep up. But anyway, I digress.

If you do a lot of commuting, I would bump up your tire pressure for that, as it helps cut down on wear. Just drop the PSI down when you want to do a canyon run and re-inflate later. This way you can have sticky tires that last quite a while too. Or just buy Sport-Touring Tires... I heard that the Metzeler Z6 Roadtecs are great tires. Sticky enough for a spirited canyon run and last a hell of a long time.
 

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Like others have said, a lot of it probably has to do with the volume in which they're manufactured. I had to replace the tires on my Vette last year and it cost $1500, but the tires are made specifically for that car (good year F1 EMTs). Just the price you pay for not having a generic vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I don't ride much. Sometimes I take the bike out for a ride just coz. All in all, I probably only put 5k miles since I bought it in Oct 05.
 
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