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I just bought a track bike that's already had some suspension work. It has a twin-clicker Fox shock, which I know about. And it's got 0.95 racetech springs in the front. What does the 0.95 mean? And when you get your forks revalved, what does that do and how do you know which kind are best? Do the valves help with rebound?
 

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Jonxmann said:
I just bought a track bike that's already had some suspension work. It has a twin-clicker Fox shock, which I know about. And it's got 0.95 racetech springs in the front. What does the 0.95 mean? And when you get your forks revalved, what does that do and how do you know which kind are best? Do the valves help with rebound?
I will answer your question, but I think a track guy is better qualified. The .95 is the strength of the spring, or stiffness. The higher the number, the stiffer they become.
Getting your forks re-valved makes the suspension work better, or worse. I have no idea which is better, but ohlins is used by top riders. Yes they help w/ rebound.
:beer
 

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Jonxmann said:
I just bought a track bike that's already had some suspension work. It has a twin-clicker Fox shock, which I know about. And it's got 0.95 racetech springs in the front. What does the 0.95 mean? And when you get your forks revalved, what does that do and how do you know which kind are best? Do the valves help with rebound?
Those springs should be good for around a 200lb rider. You can revalve the compression or the rebound or both, depending on what kind of bike you have. The forks are revalved according to the riders weight and riding style. I use Racetech goldvalves on my R6 and they make a huge difference over the stock valving. The suspension movement is very firm, but at the same time it's plush feeling... The valves and new shim stack change the way the fork fluid flows under compression and rebound. Revalving the forks and changing the shock are the best performance mods you can do (IMO).
 

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roadracer319 said:
Those springs should be good for around a 200lb rider. You can revalve the compression or the rebound or both, depending on what kind of bike you have. The forks are revalved according to the riders weight and riding style. I use Racetech goldvalves on my R6 and they make a huge difference over the stock valving. The suspension movement is very firm, but at the same time it's plush feeling... The valves and new shim stack change the way the fork fluid flows under compression and rebound. Revalving the forks and changing the shock are the best performance mods you can do (IMO).

BANG! He nailed it. .95 kg springs (especially racetech) are for ~200 lb. riders. I know because I am a 205 lb. rider, and I use those springs. I also use a fox twin clicker in the rear.

Now as far as suspension setup goes, heres my opinion. When your suspension is setup right, it's great. When it's not, it sucks! And getting it somewhere inbetween is hell on earth. (take it as you will) :D
 

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Anti-Hero said:
BANG! He nailed it. .95 kg springs (especially racetech) are for ~200 lb. riders. I know because I am a 205 lb. rider, and I use those springs. I also use a fox twin clicker in the rear.

Now as far as suspension setup goes, heres my opinion. When your suspension is setup right, it's great. When it's not, it sucks! And getting it somewhere inbetween is hell on earth. (take it as you will) :D
That's true if your set-up sucks, the bike will handle like crap (front push, rear wheel spin, frontend dive, etc) Check out the Penske and Ohlins site, they have some good set up info. Just remember to set up the sag, then get a good mid line setting and work from there. Try not to make a lot of changes at once..... a click here and a click there, especially with the rebound.
 

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The best bit of advice I can offer you is: Write down every change you make. Keep a log, and notes of every click of rebound/comp. Every twist of preload. Then keep copious notes about how the bike felt under said changes.
 
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