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DO You mount em' your self?

  • Of course!!

    Votes: 13 56.5%
  • Hell no!! Leave that to the professionals...

    Votes: 6 26.1%
  • I would if I knew how...

    Votes: 4 17.4%
  • I don't like to get my hands dirty...

    Votes: 1 4.3%
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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys. Spent $600 on hopefully the last stuff to bring my bike back from it's stolen state. Right fork seals, DID chain, and Diablo Stradas. Here's the thing: I find it insulting that someone can charge $35 to mount a tire, especially on the front (especially when it's already off to change the seals, but that's another rant). Anyway, my price was decent on the tires, but I coulda got the set for about $20 cheaper online. Minus mounting and taxes, there's another $80. So, I coulda saved $100 if I put them on myself. So my questions is, is there a great secret? Is there some mystery to mounting a tire? And yes, I'm a very mechanical person, so I'm not at all afraid to try it.
 

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Take care now ......
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1,615 Posts
I leave it up to the shop to do it. I take em' off and take them in. They've got the equipment. I have the money but not the time.
 

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There is no big secret, but expect to piss yourself off and spend an afternoon the first time. Having somebody there who has done it before would be ideal, an extra set of hands would be good either way. This is a pretty good guide:

http://www.clarity.net/~adam/tire-changing.html

There's also a how-to on Sport Rider's website. You can always ask me questions.
 

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It aint rocket science and if you have a few tools you can easily do it. It takes less time then it does draggin them to the dealer to do it and then it gets done by the friggen lot boy who doan know shyt.

Most important part is a bead breaker. Without one your fucked <period> game over.

A manual bead breaker is about $20 bux from Harbor Freight. You will never regret spending the $. Trust me I know, it's saved me many a weekend when a flat or leak would have stopped my fun.

Once the bead is broken its grip on the rim it's duck soup. A pair of decent screw drivers will work but nice tire levers are nice, I use what ever I can find atm. Any straight bar over a foot long is fine as long as it has a thin end like a screw driver.

B***** the tire/rim the easier it is. Don't let yourself be cornholed, I've changed the 12:50x35x16 tires on my truck several times! Right here at home.

The thing to keep in mind is BALANCING. The dealer does that included (better be) in the cost he nails you for. This too can be done at home if you have the bits (weights) and a long rod. It takes some time to get it right on but it's easy once ya get the hang of it. Simply slip the wheel on the long rod ya clamped in the vice and give it a gentle spin, watch where it stops. If it never stops in the same place or backs up when stopped you are in the ballpark. Backing up after stopping means you have a bad heavy spot.... go directly oppsite the place where it stopped and attach a small weight... spin again until it no longer stops in the same spot. Very simple. If done right you will never notice the difference except knowing you didnt pay any pissin munkey :pisson ta fix yer bike..... and that feels MIGHTY DAM GOOD :leghump
 

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I don't but I have a friend who will do it for me if he has the time, and he only charges me a 12 pack so it works out for me.
 

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Autobots! Roll Out!
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2,061 Posts
I work in a tire shop for cars, it's not rocket science, I can dismount, remount, air up, and balance a tire to a car in about 90 seconds. It's not rocket science, especially when you have air power'd bead breakers and computer spun balancers. Haven't tried to do a bike tire at work yet, as I can't set the balancer up to do it. I refuse to do it manually after working in a shop with the tools to do it.
 

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I pulled one off my front once (to strip paint for a polish job that turned out to be way more work than I wanted)... I second KH comment about needing a bead breaker - HOLY CRAP BATMAN - That Sucked!

Balance and the annoyance of breaking the bead are why I take them in.

My preference:
Order the tires online.
Pull the wheel and take them to the shop.
Browse for goodies while they mount/balance the new tires.
 

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V-twin anyone?
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2,161 Posts
I tried it once and I scratched my rim a bit. I stopped right there and let the guys at the shop finish it. I broke the bead okay with some long pieces of 2x4 but without decent tire irons and rim saver strips, I was ill prepared.

If I didn't care about scratching my rims, I'd do it. Otherwise, forgettaboutid!
 

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Krazy Hawaiian said:
Most important part is a bead breaker. Without one your fucked <period> game over.

A small bottle jack and a truck works fine. Place the wheel on the ground (on a piece of plywood helps), put the base of the bottle jack on the sidewall of the tire and under the frame of the truck. As you extend the jack it'll lift the truck a bit and then pop the bead right off.

A real bead breaker is better, but if you're in a pinch (like you just got a flat and your bike is stuck in New Jersey) a little improvisation goes a long way.
 

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F-You and Yourspace!
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799 Posts
I work part time at a motorcycle shop. Nuff said. :)
 
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