Sport Bikes banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello and a happy new year!
I'll get a new bike this spring(currently own an F3), what should i pick between the two? I want to switch from carbs to fuel-injection.
I'm mostly interested in reliability.
What are their common problems? I know Hondas are notorious for their ''great'' regulator/rectifiers and cam chain tensioners.
From what i've seen the gixxers are a little cheaper. So this is a +1 on Suzuki, since i'm on a tighter budget here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,233 Posts
F4i, change the oil every 3-5k, valves and spark plugs once in awhile, tires as needed. done. I've got 65k on mine now (I've put the last 23k on it)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,277 Posts
F4i. plain and simple and right answer.

Mine has been simply bulletproof. Hell, I rode the fucking thing 60 miles on a rear sprocket with 22 of the teeth left to get it changed since the previous owner decided he just wasn't gonna change it. The Cam Chain tensioner will rattle and bitch and piss and moan for thousands of miles, is not hard to change, and is not expensive either (hell I think I priced an aftermarket one that was less than 80 bucks).

Another thing to look at is the fuel pressure regulator. Another cheap part. I haven't done mine yet, but when I do, I've been told that isn't a hard job either.

I cannot speak for the R/R issues.

I'm a Honda guy if it's gotta be Japanese. I'll also say that the F4i is the most comfortable 600 I have ever sat on or ridden. if you can, get an older one with the split seat. Banana Seats do not belong on this bike.
At the end/turn of the century, Honda had a stupidly good lineup of bikes.
 

·
They call me a ride whore
Joined
·
1,387 Posts
Another vouch for the F4i...... coming up on 270,000 miles (no, not a typo) on my '04 and it still runs absolutely perfect. Cam chain tensioner... yes, get a manual one and you won't have any problems, just have to tighten it every so often (not a big deal at all and it's not that frequent). R/R's I wouldn't say is a big problem either on the F4i's... the F4i R/R's have rather large heat sinks on them unlike most of the older Hondas that had little or no heat sinks. Also eliminating all the connectors on the R/R and stator and hardwiring everything helps out quite a bit too. My original R/R lasted 100k miles, replaced with an aftermarket and it lasted 56k miles, replaced again with an OEM at 156k and that same one is still going strong with nearly 270k..... I run all my heated gear, heated grips, etc with zero problems. I've also done 6 trackdays on mine, all after the 200k mark (first one at 206k). It's performed flawlessly every single time

So... F4i... manual CCT, change oil regularly and keep all other fluids clean, and it will literally run forever with pretty much anything you can throw at it


A little about mine....



One of the trackday sessions (sorry about the annoying clicking)..... no smoke at all, doesn't burn or leak a drop of oil. This trackday was at about 245k

 

·
After Me Lucky Charms
Joined
·
5,281 Posts
Since you are from Transylvania, I suggest moving through the shadows like Dracula. Otherwise I vouch for the F4i. :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,179 Posts
The F4i is great. I want one.



That said, I love my GSX-R as well. It's been un-breakable thus far.


Close your eyes and pick one. You'll probably be happy with either, as long as you buy a decent example.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all your responses!
Seems like most people tend to favor the f4i. I'd like to hear more about the gsxr 600.
Since you are from Transylvania, I suggest moving through the shadows like Dracula. Otherwise I vouch for the F4i. :p
Poor Dracula is old, grumpy and tired these days. There's no virgin girl blood left.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,263 Posts
You'll probably find more aftermarket/spare parts for the gsxr. Many people consider the gsxr the most comfortable supersport, but the f4i is also less aggressive than most race reps. You'll definitely attract more squids with the Suzuki
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,095 Posts
F4i. plain and simple and right answer.

Mine has been simply bulletproof. Hell, I rode the fucking thing 60 miles on a rear sprocket with 22 of the teeth left to get it changed since the previous owner decided he just wasn't gonna change it. The Cam Chain tensioner will rattle and bitch and piss and moan for thousands of miles, is not hard to change, and is not expensive either (hell I think I priced an aftermarket one that was less than 80 bucks).

Another thing to look at is the fuel pressure regulator. Another cheap part. I haven't done mine yet, but when I do, I've been told that isn't a hard job either.

I cannot speak for the R/R issues.

I'm a Honda guy if it's gotta be Japanese. I'll also say that the F4i is the most comfortable 600 I have ever sat on or ridden. if you can, get an older one with the split seat. Banana Seats do not belong on this bike.
At the end/turn of the century, Honda had a stupidly good lineup of bikes.
Pred, for the average dick around spirited backroad rides and go on an occasional 300 mile highway trip, F4i or VFR?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,233 Posts
Pred, for the average dick around spirited backroad rides and go on an occasional 300 mile highway trip, F4i or VFR?
I did over 600 miles in 3 days on the F4i (300 to Vegas, 300 back home) straight slab and the F4i was pretty comfortable. I had more issues with my knees cramping up than I did with my arms, back, or ass. I was fighting 30-40 mph gusts on the way there too and barely got knocked around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,095 Posts
Any bike. Just gotta work your way up to it. I do 500 mile days on occasion with my 675, and 400's a bit more frequently.

It's at least 250 miles to get across the mountains and back here.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
Yeah that's why I can't decide what the hell I want. My criteria is very slim. That single sided swingarm on the VFR is really lustworthy though. If I were to take the bike to school, chain adjustments would be cake since it takes 30 seconds, has a centerstand, and the alignment can't really get muffed....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,277 Posts
Pred, for the average dick around spirited backroad rides and go on an occasional 300 mile highway trip, F4i or VFR?
Either. I find the ergos on the VFRto actually be VERY close to my F4i, minus the seat, and rearset placement. the 2 piece seat on the F4i is WAY better for hauling ass than the banana seat on the VFR.
If I had a way to take an F4i subframe and put it on the VFR, I would. Cause the seat on the VFR is annoying.
as are the rearsets. someone posted a set of adjustable ones. I actually find it much more comfortable to have a slightly sharper bend in my knees than what the VFR gives me. the F4i was back a bit more and a wee bit higher, and that was very nice.

the VFR is narrower. and that's something to get used to coming form an I4 bike. coming form your 500, you might find the I4 bikes a wee bit wide.
It could just be my specific bike, but the steering on the VFR is way looser than the F4i, which had a very tight, specific feel to it. the VFR is way more "loosey goosey" in how it steers. I think it needs some maintenance in the front end, although I don't specifically know where.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
I've also considered the VFR800.
How does it feel riding a V-twin compared to an I4?
Also, i know the VFRs are a tad heavier than CBRs. How's the handling?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,877 Posts
I've also considered the VFR800.
How does it feel riding a V-twin compared to an I4?
Also, i know the VFRs are a tad heavier than CBRs. How's the handling?
Riding a VFR800, regardless of Gen5 or Gen6, is pretty damned different to riding a race replica. Weaker brakes, worse suspension, the extra weight makes flicking it more of a chore, too. The VFR is no FJR, but getting off an RR and onto a VFR is a noticeable endeavor in positive and negative ways.

As far as the V-twin to I4, assuming you mean torquey V-twin and screaming I-4 (there are screaming v-twins and torquey I-4s, by the way) then I find that it comes down to a matter of taste when riding the twisties. In regards to city/suburban riding, a race rep I4 will do it fine, but a v-twin sport bike is a fair bit more effortless in everything from off of idle to mid range power where you're at most of the time when in the cities/suburbs.

As I'm sure a few would mention the Inline 3s and V-Fours are a nice mixture of the V-twin and Inline 4.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,277 Posts
I actually find my VFR is easier to wrestle about than my F4i, but a guy certainly does feel the weight.

It is also probably tires making the difference. the VFR came with Q2s, the F4i has diablos on it right now.
big difference there for sure. the suspension is definitely more washy on the VFR.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top