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OK, apparantly the guy states the bike has a lien on it and has not been paid... Thus mo title. Isn't that considered some sort of theft???
This is bullshit he should still have a title, but not a clear title. He should have a title which states the lienholders name on it. If he doesn't have this then hes feeding you a story and the bikes actually stolen. But even if he shows you a title with his name on it he still can't sell you the bike without paying off the lien first.
 

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I said new and never been dropped, thereby never totalled. So if a bike never gets crashed how can it not have a title? I can't think of a way.
how do you know it has never been crashed/totaled? because the seller says so? he has no title, right there says this is a shady deal, so there is no reason to believe that it has never been rebuilt.
 

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how do you know it has never been crashed/totaled? because the seller says so? he has no title, right there says this is a shady deal, so there is no reason to believe that it has never been rebuilt.
I was just asking in general. Yeah theres really no way to guarantee a bike hasn't been rebuilt.
 

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This is bullshit he should still have a title. The title will state the lienholders name on it. If he doesn't have this then hes feeding you a story and the bikes actually stolen.
No, it's not bullshit. Many states issue the title directly to the leinholder and not the registered owner. I've bought a number of vehicles in the past that did not have titles yet because of this. I've also purchased vehicles and not gotten a title until it was sent to me by the leinholder after paying it off.
 

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No, it's not bullshit. Many states issue the title directly to the leinholder and not the registered owner. I've bought a number of vehicles in the past that did not have titles yet because of this. I've also purchased vehicles and not gotten a title until it was sent to me by the leinholder after paying it off.
In CA they issue it to the owner, the bikes in CA. I guess its possible he brought it in from out of state?
 

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The bike is stolen
In this case you're pretty much screwed.

The owner lost the title
If this is the case, the owner (whoever's name is on the title) can talk to the DMV about getting a replacement title sent out. Very easy to do, but make sure they get that replacement title before you bring out the cash.

The bike was purchased from an auction/insurance company as a wrecked bike
A bike purchased this way should still have a title, it'll just be designated "salvage". A salvage title can't be registered and tagged, but if you get the bike working and it get it inspected in your state, you can apply for a "rebuilt" title which allows it to then be registered and tagged. This can sometimes be a pain in the ass, but if its wrecked, you should at least get a salvage title.

What I'm saying is, for most situations, if the bike is legit (they actually own it), getting a title is possible. If the seller has no title and won't tell you how to get it or where it is, there's nothing legit about the deal.
 

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Everyone's pretty much covered all the bases here.

At best the seller is ignorant and at worst a criminal.
 

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there are way too many good, titled, legit bikes to be had in the winter, in a horrendous economy. Move on to the next
 

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In CA they issue it to the owner, the bikes in CA. I guess its possible he brought it in from out of state?
They, leasing company, would not give you the title or clear it unless the bike is paid in full. If they did, there would be no collateral.


Also, you can pay off the lien directly to the company and they can send the title directly to you. However you will have to get the original owner to sign the title once you receive the title; the leasing company would have already signed it over.
 

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This is bullshit he should still have a title, but not a clear title. He should have a title which states the lienholders name on it. If he doesn't have this then hes feeding you a story and the bikes actually stolen. But even if he shows you a title with his name on it he still can't sell you the bike without paying off the lien first.
Actually remember we all live in various states. In Michigan for example you are given a title mailed to you from the DMV upon financing the vehicle. On the title it says Lien holder (in my cars case) Ford Motor Company. Once the vehicle is paid off, you are mailed a letter by the financial institution that says "PAID OFF" and they hold no more interest in the vehicle. Typically called the "Pay Off Letter". You then sell it like that, showing the letter or spend a few buck and get a new title from the DMV that has the lien holder information removed...but this is not needed to make the sale.

Now here in Colorado, when you buy a vehicle you are not given a title at all. The financial institution that holds the interest in the vehicle holds the title. When you pay off the vehicle they release the title to you. Thus it is now 100% yours to sell.

You can always sell a vehicle with a lien/loan on it. People do this all day long. But it takes trust that the person will pay off the loan amount when you hand them the money, and mail you the title when they get it. My best friend had no problems doing it with bikes and cars.

Also to note about Colorado for people. Because I moved here from Michigan and I had titles for my financed autos, it is CO policy if you bring them a title they give you a title...however this title does state that there is a lien holder on the vehicle. Lady made sure to tell me once paid off to keep the "pay off letter" with the title....or I can go in and pay $10 and get a new title with that removed by showing them the pay off letter. So a native to CO could get confused with me having a Title in hand, vs a free and clear title in hand, so always ask for the pay off letter...and look that title over to make sure it is paid off.

If you are worried, then you can ask who the loan is through. If a local bank tell them you will do the transaction at the bank. This way you can see what they owe on the bike, and if this amount will cover the loan they took, if not then did the seller bring cash to satisfy the bank loan! Example, they still owe $5K, but are selling for $3,500...do they have $1,500 to cover the difference?

Believe it or not most people are honest and they just want out of the monthly payment so the $1,500 might be doable for them...but not the long run of $5K. Or they hate riding, and want out no matter that they loose some cash to just get out. However like others said his wording is fishy...I probably check it out in person, get the VIN from various spots on the bike, run said VIN with the police...and just see how I felt about the person selling it.

So many bikes out there, I keep looking if this was going to be a hassle.
 

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They, leasing company, would not give you the title or clear it unless the bike is paid in full. If they did, there would be no collateral.
As far as I know you cannot lease motorcycles. I'm assuming you mean bank or lienholder. In CA, they give you, the "owner" a title which states any liens but with this title you cannot sell the motorcycle without a release of lien letter. I didn't realize this varied by state as I've never looked at a vehicle with a lien out of state. So its possible the bike was bought in a state where the title is not given to the "owner" and then the bike was brought into CA and thats why he doesn't have the title.

Also, you can pay off the lien directly to the company and they can send the title directly to you. However you will have to get the original owner to sign the title once you receive the title; the leasing company would have already signed it over.
I didn't know that the buyer could pay off the lien directly. Maybe because I was looking at Yamaha's and they are all finanaced through HSBC (a horrible, horrible bank) but they wouldn't talk to me about the bike at all, only the owner. If you could do this it would seem to be much safer for the buyer as you can be 100% sure the lien gets paid off.

You can always sell a vehicle with a lien/loan on it. People do this all day long. But it takes trust that the person will pay off the loan amount when you hand them the money, and mail you the title when they get it. My best friend had no problems doing it with bikes and cars.
Yeah, I didn't even realize that the policy could vary state by state. But when I was buying bikes in CA I was told (possibly incorrectly?) that if theres a lien on the bike the owner cannot legally transfer ownership to me without a lien release and therefore it may be difficult to get insured on it, if he (or the bank?) reported it stolen I could lose my bike, if I got a bunch of parking tickets then he would be liable, etc.

With that being said, I have a friend who buys/sells several cars per month for export out of the country. And probably 50% of the cars he buys have a lien against them. He trusts that the seller will pay it off and he has never been burned yet, so it is definately doable if you're willing to go through the hassle.
 

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Like in the ad below...I've been looking to buy a new bike, but it says no title..??? Are these bikes stolen? Are you able to register/insure them?

Thanks!

*black cbr 600
No buy it for dirt cheap . bc once yu get pulled over or sum. So gotta be bout running once yu take off tbey stop. So why we payimg shit for tbis ? Yeap just drive tf outa it untill yu cant. It worth 200 lop
 

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As far as I know you cannot lease motorcycles. I'm assuming you mean bank or lienholder. In CA, they give you, the "owner" a title which states any liens but with this title you cannot sell the motorcycle without a release of lien letter. I didn't realize this varied by state as I've never looked at a vehicle with a lien out of state. So its possible the bike was bought in a state where the title is not given to the "owner" and then the bike was brought into CA and thats why he doesn't have the title.



I didn't know that the buyer could pay off the lien directly. Maybe because I was looking at Yamaha's and they are all finanaced through HSBC (a horrible, horrible bank) but they wouldn't talk to me about the bike at all, only the owner. If you could do this it would seem to be much safer for the buyer as you can be 100% sure the lien gets paid off.



Yeah, I didn't even realize that the policy could vary state by state. But when I was buying bikes in CA I was told (possibly incorrectly?) that if theres a lien on the bike the owner cannot legally transfer ownership to me without a lien release and therefore it may be difficult to get insured on it, if he (or the bank?) reported it stolen I could lose my bike, if I got a bunch of parking tickets then he would be liable, etc.

With that being said, I have a friend who buys/sells several cars per month for export out of the country. And probably 50% of the cars he buys have a lien against them. He trusts that the seller will pay it off and he has never been burned yet, so it is definately doable if you're willing to go through the hassle.
Fuck a tittle on a bike . lol get it dirt cheap n have some fun untill sum happens doe just dont stop bc they will take it
 
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