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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a question for the experienced and up to date rider out there. I am a newbie to the crotch rocket scene. My buddy just bought a 05' V-Max and this is his first bike. I am more into Supersport bikes guy myself. I am a mature guy who is'nt gonna act like a fool on a bike. I'm 6' 235lb. and I am looking at a 600cc for my first bike. I will primarily be driving this bike to work but on the weekends my bud and I will be hitting the roads. Which of the new 04'-05' bikes would you all suggest and also how do you think your choice would compare to the V-Max?
 

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Mature people wouldn't look at buying a V-max/600 SS for a first bike.....

BTW,there is a little thing for your age in the profile....you kinda left that out. Hmmmmm.......

In the name of all things decent and right.....please make these type of posts STOP!!!!!! Search is your friend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
TAZISCOOL, look i know you know it all and everything but i don't want to buy a "let's say" ninja 500 and 6 months later trade it in and loose my butt on a b***** and newer bike i would rather get a nice/moderate choice and be careful. And by the way i am 23 years old i guess you must be 30-40 so that makes me a dumb little kid, right? This is the exactly what i was afraid of would happen. I asked for your ADVISE not your opinion on what bike i should get. I have been through this arguement 1000's of times. All of my friends who have bought smaller than 600cc bikes or just slower 6class bikes have all traded or wanted to trade in as little as a few weeks. SO NOW MR.FORUM KING/NEWBIE ABUSER TOUGH GUY abuse me like the newbie that i am. byebye
 

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wowwww, its like watching a 4 year old getting a shot from a doctor, they cry and whine but dont realise the doctor is only trying to help! 600ccNewbie, i hope you buy an R6 and crash in your first week, why cant you just learn from the more experienced members?? I plan on getting a mid 80's 500 to learn on, and have no problem with that. I really hope you last through your 600... :hshot
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
auron88, wow your way mature. go buy your bike and i hope you ride safely. good luck. this thread is getting off on the wrong foot.
 

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Yah, i don't think I ever understood why someone would want someone else to crash?! The whole point of this forum is to have a supportive community....Even if others may not make decisions we agree with...this is America folks, people make informed/uninformed decisions here....yes, we may not agree with starting on 600cc, but that doesn't mean we shouldn't support those who do happen to make such a decision. I initially bought a 600, and due to sound advice I found from certain individuals here, i sold it and got a 500. Lead by example, not through criticism folks
 

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This thread got off on the wrong foot because people are sick and tired of people like you asking the same questions all the time, use the damn search button.... this kind of topic has been covered like 5 times in the last day or so.
 

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what R you lookin' at?
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Why buy a smaller, used bike first and then work your way up to the larger and/or more powerful bike?
This question seems to get debated ad-nauseum on internet discussion sites so I thought I'd put together my thoughts about it... take it or leave it, this advice is genuinely offered if you are in the position of starting motorcycling.

Many people view Harleys and other cruisers as proper bikes. Big 1000cc 1200cc bikes - "men's bikes"!! Or maybe the fastest bike ever, a Hayabusa 1300cc rocketship - woah, now that's a "real bike". So, a 600cc "crotch rocket" would be half the size and therefore a kid's bike - ideal for a learner obviously... Wrong - don't even go there. The big four manufacturers fight over that lucrative market like hungry hyenas, making beautiful shiny (virtually) race ready sportbikes that few new riders can resist.

So they innocently ask "which is the best 600cc bike to learn on?".

Comparing 600cc sportbikes as starter bikes is daft. They all have twice the power and a much much higher top speed than a cruiser. Some may be tamer than others but the basic premise of a middleweight sportbike is all wrong for learning motorcycle skills. The ergonomics are out and out dangerous for a newbie on the street ( reaching for clip ons, rear-set pegs, craning neck up in traffic, restricted turning circle etc etc..) and the power's too much. It's better to focus on a smaller displacement 'standard' bike. They are set up for more compliant handling and ride and they are more comfortable, an important point while you're learning.

Take the pressure off - get a starter bike to start on.

Accidents happen mostly between 6th month and 3rd year of riding so learn on something you won't be so upset about when you drop it.

A less powerful bike will not punish you so badly for jerking the throttle like a newbie.

Smaller and lighter bikes are easier to handle. There's a lot to think about until you're comfortable about turning, stopping, gearchanging acceleration.

The value of a smaller bike, eg a 250, is learning to get the performance out of them - it really teaches you to ride to the bike's and your own potential. A 250, 350, 400 might seem small to you at first, but think of it as a step in the journey, learn to wring it's neck and be a better rider in the long run.

Regardless of power and speed, it's a good idea for new riders to geta bike that allows both feet to be placed flat on the ground. This tends to inspire confidence and will eliminate a lot of concern about dropping the bike. Undeniably, the slow parking lot type manoevers are the trickiest for a new rider, and being able to put your feet down really helps.

Smaller bikes are also usually lighter - weight can be a big deal in gaining confidence on the first bike.

Starting on a faster bike makes learning proper brake technique harder. Most new riders cannot judge how to use brakes effectively, intuition tells us that using the front brake will "flip" the bike or make the tire slide out. It's common for new riders to thus make the mistake of depending on the rear brake and the faster you are going the deadlier it can be.

Insurance rates are much higher for the larger more powerful bikes.

What if you don't like riding? Used bikes don't depreciate as quickly as new bikes so you'll lose out less when you sell it.

If you buy a cheaper bike, you'll be able to afford better quality protective gear: Minumum should be full face helmet, Leather jacket, gloves, boots and leather pants (yes - leather pants: studies show the majority of injuries to bikers are lower body injuries). Also, wear all your gear every time you ride, even if it's just a mile or two down to the shops.

Here's a selfish reason: I've been riding for many years and I don't want newbies who are out of their depth tarnishing the image of sportbike riders - yes other more experienced and immature riders do plenty of that too but law enforcement can spot a newbie on a sportbike just as easily as you or I can.

The desire for a larger bike is sometimes (often) a result of peer pressure. How you deal with what others think of you is your problem but if you decide on the sportbike because you want to fit in or because your buddies said so, then you need to think really seriously about that.

Most expert riders recommend learning on a smaller bike as the safer route.

If you ask an experienced rider's opinion, find out from them: how experienced they are, exactly what they started on and what kind of riding they do. Me, I've ridden streetbikes for 28 years and half that time on sportbikes. I started on a Yamaha RD250 two-stroke.

The salesman at the bike showroom should NEVER be considered an experienced or expert rider in this matter. Whatever he says, take it with a pinch of salt, especially if it would seem to be helping him with a sale.

Newbies on powerful sportbikes look a LOT funnier wobbling round turns than newbies on smaller bikes.

Some people claim proudly ...I survived as a litre bike newbie... having got a big bad sportbike as their first bike and six months later, they're still around to talk about it. That's great but they were/are beating the odds and playing a high stakes game - the stake they are risking is their health or even their life. It's not really that wonderful. The other thing is, it's usually quite easy to spot the ones who started on b***** bikes - uncomfortable looking on the bike, less fluid on twisty roads, more focused on straightline speed than form, and quite embarrassing to watch at less than 5mph speeds.

This is not from my own experience, but many riders have said that motorcyclists who learn first on dirtbikes end up as better riders when they transition to streetbikes. This I think is a lot to do with throttle control, balance and learning far more about the limits of tire traction. So consider going that route first. MSF now runs Dirt Bike Schools for beginners.

A used bike will teach you about motorcycle maintainance, something every rider should at least know the basics of. It's less likely you'll want to get your hands dirty on a newer or more high-tech model.

Whichever bike you have decided on, try doing the basic Motorcycle Safety Foundation training course course BEFORE you commit to a bike. The MSF lend you a small displacement bike to start on and the time you spend riding that may help you with your decision. If you're outside the USA, take a look at these training links and see if you can find a local class.
 

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I would suggest the Kawi 636. Its got more bragging rights shit, like the USD forks and the extra 37cc of displacement. Plus it comes in bright green so it will really stand out and be seen by all the bitches.

Comparing it to a V-max. It looks much cooler so you will no doubt be picking up a lot more women than your friend. And when it comes to the twisties you'll be riding on the weekends, neither one of you will be able to pass the other, so make sure you start out in the front.

No matter which one you decide on, have fun big pimpin' on the "crotch rocket scene." Play on playa! :dblthumb
 

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No new rider needs a 600cc bike to start on. The last post by RacerX and the links he posted sum up why very well.

Do you even realize that if you buy say a 1996 Ninja EX500, learn on it for a year two things will happen:

1) When you upgrade you WILL be a better rider than your friends who started on a 600+

2) You WILL be able to sell the bike VERY easily for the same amount you bought it for, so you won't be losing money either.

You can try to talk yourself into believing that a 600cc sport bike is ok to begin on because you'll "be careful" I've said this before and I'll say it again:

People only try to justify something when they KNOW they are making a mistake.

You KNOW buying a 600cc bike is the wrong thing to do, you are going to do it anyways, I can tell by your attitude, so it doesn't really matter what we say. I guess something makes you different/better than other people who are newbies right?
 

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You want a 600 because they look cool, and command respect at the local hangout. Don't try to convince yourself or anybody else with that "I'll get bored with the power" nonsense. Yeah, you really need 10 second 1/4 miles with your first bike. Sounds like a wonderful learning tool. Just admit that you're willing to take a more dangerous route in learning for the sake of looking cool or keeping up with your friends in a drag race, and move on. It's certainly not a mature decision, but best of luck to you.
 

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Look, I'm not going to flame you but being a newb I kinda have some experience here. Before I bought my bike i trolled these boards for a few weeks to see topics such as this one and i can honestly say I've read nearly every post like this. Firefighter, RacerX and Nig know what they are talking about I mean two of them are MSF instructors, but on the serious note I just picked up a ninja 500 a few weeks ago and despite their advice I did get a new one but then again I don't plan on getting rid of it, just turn it into a lightweight track bike. Now does the Ninja have all the power in the world NO, but it can still get your ass on the highway, out of trouble and is nimble as all hell in the corners and if you are good which you will be if you start small you can pass some of those 600's because you're lighter and learned properly. Nothing can replace the riding time I'm getting on my 500 to learn, yes I will upgrade eventually but I'm perfectly fine buzzing down the highway at 5000 rpm in 6th gear instead of 4th. Just my .02 kinda long though
 

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600ccNewbie said:
this thread is getting off on the wrong foot.

And that would be your fault.

If you've already had this argument a 1000 times,why did you come on here and ask agin?On almost every biker borad you're gonna get the same answer.Why,because we know better not because we know it all.
With just the few that have replied,I bet there's over 50 years of riding experience,35 with me alone.

Get what you want,just don't ask a ? you already know the answer to.
 

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Honestly get whatever you decide too. You make a mistake on a big bike, and your not gonna bounce back like a less unforgiving bike might, let alone lower cc bikes are very forgiving. I bought a '98 GSXR 600 from my friend, I am 20. I will tell you right now, its the most intimidating thing. Hell, you go 30mph, and it feels a SHIT LOAD FASTER! You don't respect the bike, don't bother getting on it. Best thing I have heard from a good friend of my moms a while back was, start small (might hate it at the time) get to know the bike as best you can, to the point that you can let the bike take control, but you can get it back because you know it that well. I don't plan on getting rid of this bike for a year or two, if that. In my eyes, a 600 is enough for me. Best thing that I have done, is I bought an older model, because its cheaper, and I started slow, granted its the first day, but didn't even do as much as I would like too. Plus I haven't even pushed myself at all, I am basically letting the bike "talk" to me and telling me how it wants to do something, just for a comfort zone. Wont do more than I know I can, screw thinking I can, that day will come. Just don't be cocky and stupid on it. I know you will, everyone does. Hell, some friends were over today and wanted to see it while I was riding around my neighborhood and I goosed 1st gear a little. After it through my ass against the back of the seat, I didn't do it, I learned not to, until the confidence comes, don't care how long it takes, but it will. Today was first day of riding too, and I learned so much. Be careful, and make a smart choice your LIFE depends on it.
 

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kawadef said:
This thread got off on the wrong foot because people are sick and tired of people like you asking the same questions all the time, use the damn search button.... this kind of topic has been covered like 5 times in the last day or so.
So what? This is the new rider forum. He can ask the same question until he turns blue if he wants to because he's in the right forum to do so. He asked a question pertaining to his situation. You don't have to answer it, and if you do, you shouldn't be belligerent about it.
 
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