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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A little Wednesday kidding around, with a touch of seriousness.

Neither the Fahrenheit or Celsius scales are based on anything related to human comfort, so it's not very relevant to use them when discussing the weather. What do you and I care about?. Is it going to be hot or cold today.

The F and C scales are based on scientific measurements of water freezing/boiling points (C) or things that have been measured, rounded off and distorted to all hell (F - I'm not going to summarize here, but the evolution of the Fahrenheit scale is rather absurd. Google it if interested). Fine for their intended use...but useless for discussing weather.

I propose a new scale. Zero on this scale will be established at 72F / 22C - the approximate minimum temperature you can comfortably sit in the shade in t-shirt and shorts drinking a beer. Each individual degree will track along the lines of Kelvin / Celsius. Thus, by this new scale, it is currently about -25 degrees Beer outside.

As a person who does not live or die based on the the freezing point and boiling point of water (0-100 C)...or the freezing point of a saturated salt solution (0 F)....this makes more sense than saying it's 27F or -3C.

Who's with me? :D
 

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We should just convert to metric and be done with it.

Countries who use the English sytem:



The US, Liberia, and Myanmar. Who uses metric? Everyone fucking else.

Boiling/Freezing point of pure water is a very good baseline. It's something that everyone deals with.

Metric is a base-10 system. None of this 3 feet in a yard, 5280 feet in a mile, 12 inches in a foot bullshit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
We should just convert to metric and be done with it.
I agree in general. However, there's plenty of exceptions.

Ask a buddy in London how big his house / flat is. You're almost certainly gonna get an answer in square feet, not square meters.

Just saying, tongue firmly in cheek, that for discussing weather and heating/cooling, a human-comfort centered scale would make more sense than either system we use now.
 

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A little Wednesday kidding around, with a touch of seriousness.

Neither the Fahrenheit or Celsius scales are based on anything related to human comfort, so it's not very relevant to use them when discussing the weather. What do you and I care about?. Is it going to be hot or cold today.

The F and C scales are based on scientific measurements of water freezing/boiling points (C) or things that have been measured, rounded off and distorted to all hell (F - I'm not going to summarize here, but the evolution of the Fahrenheit scale is rather absurd. Google it if interested). Fine for their intended use...but useless for discussing weather.

I propose a new scale. Zero on this scale will be established at 72F / 22C - the approximate minimum temperature you can comfortably sit in the shade in t-shirt and shorts drinking a beer. Each individual degree will track along the lines of Kelvin / Celsius. Thus, by this new scale, it is currently about -25 degrees Beer outside.

As a person who does not live or die based on the the freezing point and boiling point of water (0-100 C)...or the freezing point of a saturated salt solution (0 F)....this makes more sense than saying it's 27F or -3C.

Who's with me? :D

Celsius actually make more sense, especially to a motorcycle rider. Below 0C, water turns into ice. Ice = very slippery road.

And here is another reason why America should switch to metric:

 

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^^ Some Americans just need to learn how to add.
 

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^^ Some Americans just need to learn how to add.
Yes, but it is easier to add in a decimal system than in fractions. If one is working strictly in decimals, then English units are fine. The problem comes when someone asks about such and such in 19/64" and something else in 3/8". You can do it easy enough, but it opens more room for error and takes more time.


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Yes, but it is easier to add in a decimal system than in fractions. If one is working strictly in decimals, then English units are fine. The problem comes when someone asks about such and such in 19/64" and something else in 3/8". You can do it easy enough, but it opens more room for error and takes more time.


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I worked for my uncle for awhile doing suspension/alignment work. All of the alignment tools were in standard (as well as most of the adjustments) so I had to constantly break down fractions to get the right measurements. Drove me insane. If it was in decimal/metric, I probably would have stuck around longer.
 

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A little Wednesday kidding around, with a touch of seriousness.

Neither the Fahrenheit or Celsius scales are based on anything related to human comfort, so it's not very relevant to use them when discussing the weather.
Incorrect. Fahrenheit is designed specifically to provide a 0-100 range that covers the typical range of temperatures that humans encounter and can easily survive. That's why 0 was the freezing point of brine and 100 was set just above the body temperature of a human.
 
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Celsius actually make more sense, especially to a motorcycle rider. Below 0C, water turns into ice. Ice = very slippery road.

And here is another reason why America should switch to metric:
Of course, Celcius isn't really "metric" any more than Fahrenheit. If you want to go the metric-like route with temperature, you should use Kelvin. No need for these messy negative numbers.

That said, Celcius gives the freezing point of pure water at zero. Rarely will you encounter pure water in real life. Brine, saltwater, and water on many roads have different freezing points, often lower than that of pure water.

What sucks about kelvin and celcius is that they aren't granular in the human range (or anywhere, for that matter) like Fahrenheit is. Really, what we need is a new system that starts at absolute zero like Kelvin, but offers more granularity in its integers. Maybe something that's Kelvin x2. So 300 kelvin would be 600 on this new scale.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
OK, as for criticizing me...anyone with a brain should be able to see that:

1: I posted this as humor.

2: All I'm really doing is subtracting ~ 22.2 from "Celsius" to make a scale zeroed on human comfort.

3: What this really does is show how easy it would be to adapt to Celsius. Subtract 22.2. If the result is above 0, it's gonna be warm-ish. below 0, cool-ish. -20 is f'in cold (water would freeze at ~ -22.2), +20 is f'in hot.
 

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72 in the shade is too cold for a beer and shorts. 72 in the sun with a very light, warm breeze would be just fine. :beach
 

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a comfort index where 100 or 0 is 72F would make the most logical sense. But the most effective way to display Temperature is any way you can identify or interpret the data fastest.

everyone knows what 70 and 85 feel like, so that's what they use it. Its not a broken system.
 

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Of course, Celcius isn't really "metric" any more than Fahrenheit. If you want to go the metric-like route with temperature, you should use Kelvin. No need for these messy negative numbers.

That said, Celcius gives the freezing point of pure water at zero. Rarely will you encounter pure water in real life. Brine, saltwater, and water on many roads have different freezing points, often lower than that of pure water.

What sucks about kelvin and celcius is that they aren't granular in the human range (or anywhere, for that matter) like Fahrenheit is. Really, what we need is a new system that starts at absolute zero like Kelvin, but offers more granularity in its integers. Maybe something that's Kelvin x2. So 300 kelvin would be 600 on this new scale.
There is already an existing temperature scale, that uses the same size degrees as Fahrenheit, but measures from absolute zero. It's called the Rankine scale (°R), and nobody uses it.

For ordinary use, I'm pretty much equally comfortable with °C or °F. For actually figuring stuff out, though, nothing beats °K -- many things are proportional to temperature, but you can only determine the correct proportions by comparing absolute temperatures.

72 in the shade is too cold for a beer and shorts. 72 in the sun with a very light, warm breeze would be just fine. :beach
This right here is why Teej's idea is untenable. What's a "comfortable" temperature? Under what conditions? Last spring, after a few months of actual cold, 40°F (5°C) felt pretty damn warm. The first day it was over that, my wife and I celebrated by going out for ice cream. We sat outside on the patio, in the shade, without jackets on, eating ice cream, and both felt genuinely warm and comfortable at 41°F.

At the very least, a "comfort" based temperature scale is going to have to have one scale for men, and a quite different one for women. :D

PhilB
 

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I don't know, I have worked with some women (usually older ones) who need to have to air conditioning down around 60 or they burst into flames.

But I agree, temps can affect me differently depending on what it's contrasting with. Last January when we had a weekend in the 50's with some sun and I was out riding. But this week it dipped down into the 50's for the high, and the very last thing I want to do is go riding. I got out all my winter clothes and bundled up. :giggle
 

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Wouldn't a system based on comfort also be dependent on humidity?
Besides the fact that a "comfortable temperature" would be dependent on the individual.

Edit: I know temperature itself isn't influenced by humidity but our perception of temperature is..


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Of course, Celcius isn't really "metric" any more than Fahrenheit. If you want to go the metric-like route with temperature, you should use Kelvin. No need for these messy negative numbers.
Kelvin is kind of the same scale as celsius, just with a different starting point though. 1 degree change in Celsius is a one degree change Kelvin.

I think the scale should be

5 cant go outside without sweating
4 cant do anything strenuous without sweating
3 can sit comfortably, do semi strenuous activities without sweating
2 need sweatshirt and pants to be comfortable
1 need coat, hat, gloves to be comfortable
 
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