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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Over the last year I have been in something of a rut trying to figure out what to do after finishing graduate school. I got my Master's Degree in business administration but have worked in restaurants all of my life. While spending some time at the local motorcycle dealership having my bike serviced I began thinking about trying to get a job there.
I don't have any sales experience, however I have waited tables, bar-tended, and managed restaurants so interaction with the public is nothing new to me. I am 31 and started riding two years and three months ago. Riding has changed my life and my outlook on life; it is great to have something that brings me such joy and I think it would be wonderful to work around bikes.
One of my friends is the service manager and said that I can use him as a reference. Also, he told me that I seem enthusiastic about it which is one thing they are looking for; he says many of their recent salespersons have been young kids who didn't seem to care very much.
This is the only dealership within commuting distance soI want to give myself the best possible chance of getting the job and my friend told me that I should brush up on the basics of ATVs and watercraft which they also sell and I know very little about which brings me to my question- What information should I try to learn about ATVs and jet-ski's to improve my chances of getting the job and does anyone maybe know of any good related sites to begin my studying. Also, my knowledge of cruisers is limited but I have spend much of the last couple years learning everything I can about sportbikes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
^ Also, does anyone have any idea why my paragraphs post like this? When I typed it each papagraph was nicely indented so please don't hold the wall of text against me. It always does that.
 

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Commission on motorsports are very low for salesmen. Trust me. It's good that you feel the calling but get into anything else. All sorts of wholesalers, distributors, manufacturers in all sorts of industries are hiring sales guys. Find something, anything interesting, and go balls deep. Six figures easy if you put your heart to it. But forget motorsports.
 

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They go through kids because even they cant live off those low wages.

Motorsports commision does suck unless your at a high volume store and make a name for yourself.



Auto sales is a little better, and easier to get hired, and you can see if you can even deal with it cutting your teeth.


As a successful slaesperson, I see a 95% rejection rate within those that are hired, and those that are a cut above and can survive in a cutthroat dealership atmosphere.

Its not for everyone and the hours are pathetic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Bummer about the low income for motorsports salespersons. My mother sold cars for 25 years in northern Virginia and made a killing. The hours were very long though and she says the industry is not anywhere near as lucrative now-a-days due to changes in the economy. I really have to find something to do to get out of food service. I am so sick of cooking for people and waiting on them. Also, the government would like if I began paying back my $70,000 in student loans so I really do need to get into a career that offers a decent earning potential.
 

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Let me see if I have this right.....

31 yo
MBA
Has worked menial jobs to-date
Want to do Motorsport sales?

Gaaaack!!!
 

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If you really want to end up in sales (I'd suggest you don't) I'd stay away from consumer products. Industrial supplies or agricultural/construction machinery where the margins aren't tiny and you don't have to do massive volume to make ends meet, you also don't have to be completely full of it 24/7.
 

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I would maybe try getting your foot in the door in a marketing department somewhere you've worked before. There may be a commission/sales opportunity in the B2B side of the industry, You may find a better position there. I'm surprised you didn't go into sales after undergrad.. the majority of business grads do (who get jobs that is). May I ask why you wanted to get your MBA? Not trying to cut you down just trying to see what position would really suit you.

EDIT: I think Nero has it right here, with those qualifications you may be better set up to go into a position a tad over qualified and work your way up. I know a few people working in sales for consumer products, one working for P&G is totally stressed all the time and yes the potential for profit is there but if you aren't the best your at risk. If you don't have any real business work experience and you aren't specialized in accounting, you may have to start in sales to get a job though...
 

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I recommend you give two more years of school a try and specialize in something. I've cleaned toilets and had retards as bosses. If you get a good education, you can get a job where you get treated with respect. That includes a good pay. If you've worked in restaurants, you know hard work. Time to cash in.
 

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, you also don't have to be completely full of it 24/7.

That has never made a good salesperson.


One reason why im successful is product knowledge, and being as honest as possible.


There are many small differences that add up to being good at any job, and sales is no different.
 

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I couldn't agree more. I'm our program manager and don't do the sales thing so to speak. I go out with the sales guy's though and explain our services in whatever detail they want.

Working in defense logistics the military and defense contractors don't seem to like "Smiley's". They seem to get on better with those of us who have hands on experience in the areas they ship to or who have worked in the Crapastans of the world.

That said, find your niche in B2B, and it could be sales within the restaurant business or something that ties into it. Use what you know to get you where you want to be.

That has never made a good salesperson.


One reason why im successful is product knowledge, and being as honest as possible.


There are many small differences that add up to being good at any job, and sales is no different.
 

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Basically what everyone else has said: Motorsports sales is horrible anywhere except for a TOP dealership which has extremely high volume; and even then the work hours are terrible. When I say terrible I mean YouDidntGoToSchoolToGetAnMBAToWorkThoseKindsOfHoursTerrible.
 

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It depends on what you're looking for in life. For the right person, there's A LOT of potential. I went to work for a motorcycle dealership, partially because I was burnt out at a good job, so I thought working 70hrs/wk was a good plan... Oh well...

Anyway, if you want a long-term career in powersports (motorsports are racing), an MBA is part of the deal. If you want to do it, do what I did, get there an hour before they open and stay until they close. Learn every aspect of it. Get to know the parts reps and the manufacturer reps and look for positions within those companies, as well as try to do your own F&I (if they will let you). Then as quick as you can, move into a real industry.
 

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It depends on what you're looking for in life. For the right person, there's A LOT of potential. I went to work for a motorcycle dealership, partially because I was burnt out at a good job, so I thought working 70hrs/wk was a good plan... Oh well...

Anyway, if you want a long-term career in powersports (motorsports are racing), an MBA is part of the deal. If you want to do it, do what I did, get there an hour before they open and stay until they close. Learn every aspect of it. Get to know the parts reps and the manufacturer reps and look for positions within those companies, as well as try to do your own F&I (if they will let you). Then as quick as you can, move into a real industry.
Well said. Almost descibes my full resume.
 

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Man! MBA living in NC. Charlotte is banking country. There’s got to be something better and more rewarding you can do there. Are you willing/able to relocate to Charlotte or any other city or state? That will open your opportunities.

The Federal government is in a tough spot right now but look for internships there. An example is the Naval Acquisition Intern Program (NAIP). Other federal offices and three letter agencies have similar programs. Search the Internet and go to USAJobs website.

Other than that, if you know food, and love the food business, and know the in’s and out’s, you can go for that own your own.

Good luck.

NAIP info: Naval Acquisition Career Center - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

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Bummer about the low income for motorsports salespersons. My mother sold cars for 25 years in northern Virginia and made a killing. The hours were very long though and she says the industry is not anywhere near as lucrative now-a-days due to changes in the economy. I really have to find something to do to get out of food service. I am so sick of cooking for people and waiting on them. Also, the government would like if I began paying back my $70,000 in student loans so I really do need to get into a career that offers a decent earning potential.
As rgbeard said: you just paid >70,000 dollars to get a degree. You're a grown adult. You should not have to accept a job that they're also employing young, high school graduates at. Its not like your degree is in under water basket weaving!!

Depending on the field of your bachelors degree, an MBA should make you a highly desirable employee.

If its your passion to become a salesman in a powersports dealer, then my suggestion would be why on earth did you spend all that money getting a degree. If you're doing it out of percieved desperation, get out there and start throwing resumes around!! In my opinion theres a job out there for everyone, you just have to look hard enough.
 

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So basically you have a M.B.A. and no in field expierience? You may have overeducated yourself out of your market.
 
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