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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
He bought a VFR 750 against my better advice. It's better than an SS for sure, but it's still too much HP and too heavy. It has a very smooth throttle, so no abrupt speed changes. He's geared up at least, and I led, so chose a relatively easy route and kept the speed down, stopping every once in a while to offer instruction and correction. Have to get him using the front brake a bit more forcefully, but at least he's not using too much. Going to hit the church parking lot this weekend for some drills.

If you're a new rider, I highly recommend hooking up with an experienced, older rider to ride with to coach you.
 

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Mexican Hard Shell Taco
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Sigh... You can only do so much to help them, but in the end, it's a dog eat dog world.

VFR750 has too much power, is heavy and doesn't crash well. BUT, it could be a LOT worse.
 

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Sigh... You can only do so much to help them, but in the end, it's a dog eat dog world.

VFR750 has too much power, is heavy and doesn't crash well. BUT, it could be a LOT worse.
Just curious as to what crashing well is? I've totaled a few cars and a bike in my time, and afterward I never thought, "that went well. " Apparently I keep getting the bad ones!

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Silent pipes take lives
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the best bike for crashing I have to say is DZR400. I have a bud who put that bike down in every way possible with vary little expense.
I would also ponder the a naked SV650 or V storm
 

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If you're a new rider, I highly recommend hooking up with an experienced, older rider to ride with to coach you.

I'm still very green. Looking to buy a 250 or 500 whatever is available and affordable in the next few weeks. Have all the gear, MSF taken, endorsement acquired. I think I'm on the right track...

I'm very much interested in finding a riding mentor, but being such a novice how do I even differentiate between the guy who has no clue what's going on and the guy who has a lot to teach? I guess it goes without saying avoid anyone without the gear or doing speed runs or maybe a couple other obvious red flags, but beyond that? Even then, if you are experienced speed runs might not be smart, but they wouldn't necessarily preclude someone from being a good mentor, assuming they aren't pushing me to do speed runs? I don't know, you tell me.

I've got enough hobbies where safety can be marginalized by incompetent partners and there is a vetting process we go through to check people out. Gear and some conversations about previous experience count for something, but I don't get commited to anything with serious exposure until I've actually seen how they operate. What risks do they take? How do their choices increase or decrease my level of risk? Are they paying any attention to my performance or mental state or are they out to have fun with someone else in tow? I've been fortunate to chance across some good mentors in other sports, mostly through dumb luck, but I had some duds along the way. Fortunately in those pursuits risk was related to skill and until I developed the skills I wasn't putting myself in seriously hazardous situations.

Any advice on finding worthy riding partners/mentors or obvious red flags of people to stay away from. There was a short lived sport riding group in town organized through facebook but after their first ride and a complete novice down with massive road rash they disbanded. Prior to the incident they were saying a lot of the right things to make me think they were worth getting to know. In hind sight the incident was a giant red flag, unlicensed, no gear, first time out, trying to keep up with what was described as a spirited ride. The novice should have self policed a little better, but the experienced riders hardly took him under their wing. All this from the comfort of my arm chair though. Maybe it was just an unfortunate accident...

Loved the MSF and can't imagine not loving riding for many years to come. No rush to go fast or be dumb. I'm trying to live a long time with all my limbs. I've got more than enough scars from others endeavors, no need to add to the catalogue.

TLDR; How do you know who's legit to ride with if you are new and don't know what's correct or incorrect, safe or unsafe riding?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm still very green. Looking to buy a 250 or 500 whatever is available and affordable in the next few weeks. Have all the gear, MSF taken, endorsement acquired. I think I'm on the right track...

I'm very much interested in finding a riding mentor, but being such a novice how do I even differentiate between the guy who has no clue what's going on and the guy who has a lot to teach? I guess it goes without saying avoid anyone without the gear or doing speed runs or maybe a couple other obvious red flags, but beyond that? Even then, if you are experienced speed runs might not be smart, but they wouldn't necessarily preclude someone from being a good mentor, assuming they aren't pushing me to do speed runs? I don't know, you tell me.

I've got enough hobbies where safety can be marginalized by incompetent partners and there is a vetting process we go through to check people out. Gear and some conversations about previous experience count for something, but I don't get commited to anything with serious exposure until I've actually seen how they operate. What risks do they take? How do their choices increase or decrease my level of risk? Are they paying any attention to my performance or mental state or are they out to have fun with someone else in tow? I've been fortunate to chance across some good mentors in other sports, mostly through dumb luck, but I had some duds along the way. Fortunately in those pursuits risk was related to skill and until I developed the skills I wasn't putting myself in seriously hazardous situations.

Any advice on finding worthy riding partners/mentors or obvious red flags of people to stay away from. There was a short lived sport riding group in town organized through facebook but after their first ride and a complete novice down with massive road rash they disbanded. Prior to the incident they were saying a lot of the right things to make me think they were worth getting to know. In hind sight the incident was a giant red flag, unlicensed, no gear, first time out, trying to keep up with what was described as a spirited ride. The novice should have self policed a little better, but the experienced riders hardly took him under their wing. All this from the comfort of my arm chair though. Maybe it was just an unfortunate accident...

Loved the MSF and can't imagine not loving riding for many years to come. No rush to go fast or be dumb. I'm trying to live a long time with all my limbs. I've got more than enough scars from others endeavors, no need to add to the catalogue.

TLDR; How do you know who's legit to ride with if you are new and don't know what's correct or incorrect, safe or unsafe riding?
"Spirited ride" = NO NOOBS. Period. Big groups are generally bad, because testosterone and sport bikes tends to lead to speed and stunts. Big groups are really bad for newbies because they usually try to keep up and get to riding way over their heads.

I've known this kid since he was 5 or 6 - he's 23 now. His dad rides a gold wing and he's spent a lot of time riding bitch. Find somebody with some miles under their belt, maybe some track time or MSF certification in experienced rider courses.
 

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Perhaps they don't crash well due to the side mounted radiators? Perhaps the fall, depending on how the hit is, would brake rad tab(s) loose making for more problems.

Not sure when they started that but I'm pretty sure the 4th (750) 5th (800) and 6th (V-tech) have them. It wasn't said which model year the OP's friend is riding. Not a HORRIBLE starter bike, but too much for a newbie, for sure. At least say it has an aftermarket pipe on there so the entire situation isn't a total loss. :p :drool V4 at high revvs :drool
 

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Mexican Hard Shell Taco
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Perhaps they don't crash well due to the side mounted radiators? Perhaps the fall, depending on how the hit is, would brake rad tab(s) loose making for more problems.

Not sure when they started that but I'm pretty sure the 4th (750) 5th (800) and 6th (V-tech) have them. It wasn't said which model year the OP's friend is riding. Not a HORRIBLE starter bike, but too much for a newbie, for sure. At least say it has an aftermarket pipe on there so the entire situation isn't a total loss. :p :drool V4 at high revvs :drool
I'll take that back, the 750 doesn't have the silly side mounted radiators the 800s have...

They just crash as well as any other tupperware ladden heavy bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Perhaps they don't crash well due to the side mounted radiators? Perhaps the fall, depending on how the hit is, would brake rad tab(s) loose making for more problems.

Not sure when they started that but I'm pretty sure the 4th (750) 5th (800) and 6th (V-tech) have them. It wasn't said which model year the OP's friend is riding. Not a HORRIBLE starter bike, but too much for a newbie, for sure. At least say it has an aftermarket pipe on there so the entire situation isn't a total loss. :p :drool V4 at high revvs :drool
It has a pipe, yes. And it sounds amazing... Bike was laid down a year ago, rashed plastics, but mechanically ok. He picked it up for $1300. Not sure what year, but it's all white.
 

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It has a pipe, yes. And it sounds amazing... Bike was laid down a year ago, rashed plastics, but mechanically ok. He picked it up for $1300. Not sure what year, but it's all white.
93 Pearl Crystal White, maybe? (Or maybe it's a 4th gen that one of the OPs painted white.) All of the 4th gen are Red for U.S.A and 5th/6th are 800cc...well...781 really.



(Huge VFR fan. Don't mind me.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
It's a '93... I'm a big fan, but not as big as you, apparently. :) I may sell him my '06 at the end of the year for his '93 and cash, and then go trade in on one of the new 1200s. Yes, it has some "flaws" but it's a great bike for my purposes.
 
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