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Well I apologize. I thought you were trying to be a doucher.
I have the data in my head and hand. I've used both. No doubt ss lines are better, but do you not agree under normal street riding they are overkill? The fluid doesn't get hot enough for them to fade imo. Some good fuid and pads will help a lot. Ss lines aren't cheap. I was simply letting him know that if he wanted to he could use that money for something else he may want



Oh and to the op, I see you're in warner robins. Pm me if you ever wanna ride; I'm about 40 min north of you
He already has the lines. OP and I have spoken over the phone about the installation. No, I actually don't agree they are overkill. Whats wrong with consistent safe braking all the time.
 

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Well hell if he already has them go for it.
Imo stock lines are consistent and safe. But hey its just my opinion based on my experience. We can just disagree, no big deal.
I see you lived in ga and rode the gap a lot. Know of decent roads between mcdonough and macon? I'm tired of the same roads I know.
 

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Stock lines are rubber, and they deteriorate over time. Even new, without the SS braid they can expand and not transfer as much pressure to the caliper, hence the brakes feel 'softer' and have less bite. It is usually the first mod I do for any bike, knowing that the stock lines can and will deteriorate, and based on the fact that I find street riding to be even more reliant on stopping that track riding. When the cage in front of me stands up on his brakes, I want the best stopping action I can get personally.

I don't see them as overkill for the street.

Also, taller tire is not faster turn in - that raises the front end and can make the steering more neutral or even 'numb' based on where the forks are set in the triple. Lower profile tires (smaller number) should make the bike turn in faster, since the bike is lower in the front.

To counter, you'd need to raise the forks in the triple (provided you have fork travel to do so) to correct for the change in bike geometry. There is an article on this exact topic in Sport Rider this month...

In short, raising the rear end (shimming the shock, etc), or lowering the front (dropping fork tubes in the triple or putting on lower profile tires) should make a bike turn in faster.
 

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On that set it was 99% comuter miles and never saw much hard acceleration or anything. Kept 33 psi in them and checked it every ride. Prly helped that most of those miles were loged over the winter so the tire never got to hot.
That has to be a record. I ride street and can't get 3000 miles out of a set on my ZZR600. At 3k they are useless - down to the cords even. Great tires, but really soft. The good news is they are cheap and can be had for under $200 a set if you shop around.
 

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also want to know if i go from a 120/65-ZR17 to a 120/60-ZR17 is that gonna be a big difference? of should i go up to a 120/70-ZR17? trying to do research but all these numbers are starting to run together.... looing at conti montions.
In the August issue of "Sport Rider Magazine" pg 82, the same question has been asked and answered.

Fender and Radiator issues were brought to light for me, more specific Radiator and the way to check for these issues that may arise.

Its a good read!
 
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