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I was reading The WallStreet Journal, yes I read it. (they are talking about car tires, but it should also pertain to motorcycle too)

I can't copy and pasted to I type only the important parts of the article.
If you see any missed spell words, I'm sorry.

There is a article titled "Tires Get An Expiration Date"

"Ford has started urging consumers to replace tires after six years. The move is roiling the tire industry, which insists there's no scientific evidence to support a "use by" date for tires"

For many consumers, the issue never comes up since passerger-car tires last an average of 44,000 miles-meaning they are usually replaced before hetting the six-year mark. But many people simply assume that unused spare tires-even those that are a decade old-are as durable as brand-new tires, as somtimes use those spares as full-time replacements for the regular tires.

The age of tires already appear on tires, but as part of a lengthy code that is difficult for the average consumer to decipher. To find the age of a tire, look for the letters DOT an othe sidewall (indicating compliance with applicable safety standards set by the U.S. Departmen of Transportation). Adjacent to these letters is the tire's serial number, which is a combination of up to 12 numbers and letters. The last characters are numbers that identify the week and year of manufacture. For example, 1504 means the fifteenth week of the year 2004.

Firestone spokeswoman Christine Karbowiak says the company can't comment on Ford's new recommendation, because it hasn't seen Ford's research.
Tire makers certainly down't want to see the six-year rule becone any more deeply ingrained. While it might seem that putting a limit on the lifespan of tires would be a boon to tire makers, who would persumably sell more tires, the cost and complications it could create are considerable. Among other things, the industry is worried about the logistical problems that would arise if customers suddenly started demanding only the "freshest" tires, In some cases, tires takes months to move through distribution channels from factories-thought wholesaler, and then on to retail outlets.

We don't have any data to support an expiration date [for tires]," say Mr. Zielinski of the RMA. He agrees that age can be a factor in tire performance, but says it shouldn't be used as the sole reason to determine that a tire is no loger usable.

Mr. Zielinski says Ford went public with its positon without sharing its research with the tire association or individual tire maker. Ford, in turn, says that is presented it research in trade publication and ast a series of public forums, inclding a technical meeting of the rubber division of the American Chemical Society in San Antonio, Texas, two weeks ago. Ford has also given its research to the NHTSA, which is developing a test ot simulate the effects of aging on tires.

Ford's test involves putting inflated tires into an over for weeks at a time. The tires are then taken out and studied to see, among other things, how well the layers of rubber hold together.

Strategic Research wants tires to be labeled more clearly with the date they were preduced, so consumer can better identify older tires and, ultimately, an explicit expiration date.
 

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I agree, but I think a "inspection" date should be required not a expiration date, over here 3 years in the sun gets some tires to develope cracks on the sidewalls :eek: It depends alot on the tire and if the owner took care of them at all.... Silacone works wonders to prolong a tires life. (non petroleum based, pure electrical silicone usually is that way. Costs alot but the petro kills rubber)
 

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copied from another forum-


Learned a lesson the hard way last week, so I figure I'll pass the info I learned on to as many other people as possible. Some of you may already know the info, but some might not.

I spoke with a Pirelli rep on the phone yesterday. Got the "official" recommended shelf life for their tires...

Street tires, including the Diablos and Diablo Corsas - 5 - 7 years.

DOT race tires - 3 years

Race slicks - 1 year

Race rains - 6 months

Store tires away from sources of ozone in a cool and dark location. Sources of ozone include electric motors, paint, refrigerants, and exhaust. This makes storing tires in a basement near a furnace, washing machine, AC unit, or paint a bad decision. It also makes storing tires in a garage a bad idea.

What prompted me finding this info out was unexpectedly (obviously) going down for the first time last Thursday. I'd mounted Diablos on my Tuono the weekend prior. Front totally lost all grip at a medium lean angle riding a fairly leisurely sport touring pace. I ended up going down (lowside). I'm fine. The bike is remarkably okay (all cosmetic - parts should be here Tue or Wed), and I continued on my way after the accident, putting over 1100 more miles on by the end of the weekend.

You can find the "born on" date on your tire on the sidewall. There will be a stamped oval with a 3 or 4 digit number in it. ex. 0502 The numbers denote the week and year of manufacture. My example would mean the tire was made the 5th week of 2002.

I stored the tires I put on for over a year within 6 feet of my furnace (which houses A/C coils and have a slight leak), dehumidifier, and washing machine. I think I contributed to premature deterioration.



 
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