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the joke is in your hand
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I took a job at a kawasaki,suzuki,yamaha, polaris dealership working in the service dept.

so far Kawasaki stands out as the worst of the worst when it comes to service manuals and the quality of the bikes in general. they're so bad i'm actually very disappointed and shocked.

I have direct download access to every bike they make of course. however, the manuals are so bad, I have to resort to guessing, google, or youtube.

so for example, I need a manual for a ninja 500. well they do not list bikes with their commercial name. instead they call it a ex500. so when you try to find a 2006 ninja 500 they do not list bikes in the database like what youd expect to find. 2006---ninja 500. right? nope, you have to scroll down till you find the lists of 500's. now you need the vin to find out what the code name is for a ninja 500. turns out it's a ex500.
well they don't have a manual for the ex500 you need the "base manual" for the en 500 which is a V twin engine cruiser and the supplement manual for the ex500a.

this is the list. as you can see my arrows pointing to what they tell me I need.



where it tells me what manuals to use. notice this is a supplement manual and has 37 pages. not enough info to be a complete manual of the whole bike.



this is the verified correct manual kawasaki says to use...



to work on this bike.. the manual above has absolutely no relevance to the bike below (clearly obvious in part pictures) i've looked through the whole manual and do not see one single thing remotely the same on the bike below.




now there is the fact the manuals are missing pages too.
for example the clutch page ends on page 5 and stops with adjusting the lever. that's all you get. it's frigging astonishing how bad kawasaki is. this is not the only bike they do this with. so far every bike I tried to look something up for does not have the right info I need. a brute force atv I had to build the trans in (it came to us in a box) did not tell me the dia of the washers that go in it.



I will never buy a kawasaki after working on them and dealing with them is a joke. I've seen a brand new 600 weeping oil from a spot(yes a spot) on the head, seeping oil out all over. bike didn't have 500 miles on it and it's junk already. not to mention all the new ninja 300, 500 etc, made in thailand.
 

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the joke is in your hand
Joined
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8,588 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
for comparison here is how yamaha and suzuki lists their manuals. (kawasaki doesn't even call their bikes by their name and don't list it by year ect so you have no idea what manual is correct) it would be like looking up car parts by a model code that GM, FORD etc don't explain or show you what it is. if it were not for google I couldn't find anything for a kawasaki.





and here is kawasaki. can you find a the 2017 ZX10r or h2 manual?




I just can't believe one of the largest manufacturer of motorcycles can't do a proper website for it's company. :bitchslap
 

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the joke is in your hand
Joined
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8,588 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
susser tod, a lot of bikes have non replaceable fuel filters. I guess they estimate by time it needs one the bike will be trashed lol.

yamaha does the same thing. I guess there is only so much room in a bike for parts too. there is no bike that's easy to work on. sportbikes are designed to come apart easy for the most part but have shit tons of plastics to remove just to see the engine. cruisers have carbs/throttle bodies that are hard to get to, everything is under the tank. even the damn radiator caps on most of them. hell some yamaha's you have to take the seat off to check the oil. some of them have 2 oil drains. some of the newer kawasaki's z1000 etc, there is like 4 or 5 side plastic cover but they're all interconnected and assembled from the bottom up. so to get one off in the way of something you have to end up taking the whole goddamn side of the bike apart. you have to start with the top that sometimes wraps around the front too. so it's almost stripping the bike all the way down just to get into a bolt for something like a bracket to remove the battery. I'm being serious. they're getting that bad.

some of these large cruisers I have to take the exhausts and footpegs (with rear brake calipers on them) off just to replace the oil filter. but they don't charge extra for the oil change. (dumbass place I work for) I've come to the realization that bikes are harder to work on than cars. it would be like having to remove the hood, fenders, front facia and wheels to do an oil change. to be honest, harley's are a lot easier to work on than most japanese bikes.


there's also the fact some of the manuals on their site are not entirely uploaded. I needed a one for a bike the other day, there's nothing in it beyond the first few pages. it's all blank. and when you skip a few chapters and go back it has to download all over again. some of them are 100mb in size so I sit and wait for 5 mins. it's a fucking waste of time.
 

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I have a 2006 Daytona 675. It's a joy to work on, relative to most bikes. It's put together in a way that's logical, easy to get apart and back together, and doesn't have near the amount of fiddly crap that other bikes have. The biggest PITA plastic that I can recall was about a 2001 R6. I won't miss those when they are all gone.
 

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I have a 2006 Daytona 675. It's a joy to work on, relative to most bikes. It's put together in a way that's logical, easy to get apart and back together, and doesn't have near the amount of fiddly crap that other bikes have. The biggest PITA plastic that I can recall was about a 2001 R6. I won't miss those when they are all gone.
I particularly love the ZZR1200 and ZRX1200R Kawasakis. They are very easy to work on.:grin:
 
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