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apparently things dont really change and people need to read the first few pages, even though it is over a year old.
 

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apparently things dont really change and people need to read the first few pages, even though it is over a year old.
I'm not sure if you're referring to me...

If so, I have read this thread and I agree with the OP and the general sentiment of the thread. I was going a little further on my opinion of "experience" since that seemed to be what the more recent posts were concerned with.

Experience can't easily be measured in miles or years. I have two years of street riding and a ton of miles. I was severely limited in what I experienced though. I logged a lot of time riding in typical suburban traffic, but very little on the highway, less in urban areas, and none in rural areas. Have I had many experiences? Yes. Am I an experienced rider? In one sense, partially; in most others, not at all.
 

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The thing is, when handing out advice on the internet, you can't judge exactly where someone is at in their experience, we can only go by how long they say they've been riding, how many miles they guesstimate and the judge skill level by the stories they tell and questions they ask. It's better to assume they don't have maximum experience for the time/miles they report.
 

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What is it they say? Men will over compensate by 10,000 miles?



:neener
 

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I'm not sure if you're referring to me...

If so, I have read this thread and I agree with the OP and the general sentiment of the thread. I was going a little further on my opinion of "experience" since that seemed to be what the more recent posts were concerned with.

Experience can't easily be measured in miles or years. I have two years of street riding and a ton of miles. I was severely limited in what I experienced though. I logged a lot of time riding in typical suburban traffic, but very little on the highway, less in urban areas, and none in rural areas. Have I had many experiences? Yes. Am I an experienced rider? In one sense, partially; in most others, not at all.
Well said.
 

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I'm not sure if you're referring to me...

If so, I have read this thread and I agree with the OP and the general sentiment of the thread. I was going a little further on my opinion of "experience" since that seemed to be what the more recent posts were concerned with.

Experience can't easily be measured in miles or years. I have two years of street riding and a ton of miles. I was severely limited in what I experienced though. I logged a lot of time riding in typical suburban traffic, but very little on the highway, less in urban areas, and none in rural areas. Have I had many experiences? Yes. Am I an experienced rider? In one sense, partially; in most others, not at all.
i didnt even read past post 1, because i felt i had read it already, then i noticed the date, and saw all the bumps.
 

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When i started off here i read the stickys because i frequent internet fourms and know what they are. Some others may not have the same fourm experiance. And i think everyone knows that this is a dangerous sport, and i agree that reality should not be sugar coated. However maybe proper explaniation of the risk involved is alot more effective than just stating the end result. Knowing that you can die isnt informitive, knowing what you can do to prevent that death is. That is why so many riders here, including myself push people to get proper gear, or at least a helmet/jacket/glove combo and some nice thick workboots(non steel toe).

I also didnt say to valitade the behavior, but rather to steer them away from it without lashing out at them. When i started here many of you(well not you inparticular) talked to me calmy, like i wasnt a compleate idiot. The positive feedback, and guidence without rude or inapropriate comments is what steared me to get my used Gs 500, when i could have had the used GSXR 600 that was right next to it for about 900 bucks more.

And while site recruting isnt what i had in mind, i ment it as if they stay here they can continue to learn safer habbits, info for their first track day, read others experiances on a daily basis rather than be shun the first day, go buy a liter bike, and continue down the wrong path for many years to come if they make it.

PS: I started small, just because i have a 900RR now, doesnt mean that i started with it. I learned to ride first on my 500, took my MSF course, got all my gear, got alot of street experiance including several long trips and everyday commuting experance. AND THEN i got my 900. I was agreeing with you in your first post, however you jumped to conclusion about my own riding, which is exactly what i was refering NOT to do.
experiance
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Please put down the motorcycle and consult a dictionary immediately
 

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And that's exactly why I have trouble listening to the guys who say "I know, I log 15k miles a year"... Sure, you put on a lot of miles, but they're highway miles.

I'd guarantee that in my 4 months and 800 miles I've seen and experienced a hell of a lot more than a lot of those guys have, because I'm commuting through a city every day. I've learned to squeeze and not grab, I've learned when and why to cover my front brake, and I've learned when and why I need to be in a lower gear and in my powerband... how? I've needed to - I have people making lefts in front of me all the time... There's a cool little maneuver up here in New England that we call the Rhode Island Roadblock - the left turner starts their turn, then stops and blocks the flow of traffic until they can finish it safely. When there's a bike in the way, though, they don't wait for the "until they can finish it safely", they just finish it.

I'm not saying that I know more than anyone here with my limited experience, but I am saying that if you say "I've been on the street for 30 years" I'm much more likely to believe you than if you say "I put on 18k miles least year, you don't know anything". It's about experiences, not miles.
The type of people who put tons of miles on ride EVERYWHERE. Someone who puts 15-20K on their bike a year doesnt just ride "big long highway trips".

I ride mostly 100 or 200 mile loops on the weekend, and commute every practical day on my bike.


MILES COUNT, the guy who puts 1000 miles a year on his bike for 15 years is nothing but a weekend warrior.
 

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why isnt this one stickied yet?
 

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Hey fellow riders. I just finished my msf class, got 98 on written 92 on my ridden. Man the box sucked bad and the emergency quick stop in the rain storm we had on sunday. Do have a complaint though, the instructors told the new riders to counter steer you push down on the grip side you wanna turn. As push down left to go left, thank god I have previous experiance and know push forward slightly "oposite way to cause a lean and gravity pluse physics take over. man....
 

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And here's a table from the MAIDS study concerning rider experience in months/accident statistics.

I didn't read through the whole thread to see if this was brought up, but the way I read the graph is that in the
first 6 months of riding there were 37.2 accidents per month(out of the sample),
second 6 months of riding there were 25 accidents per month...,
during the second and third year there were 9.4 accidents per month...,
etc...

To me this would show that the most dangerous time to ride is during the first year, particularly the first 6 months, not years 2 and 3.

Am i reading the graph wrong? I'm no statistics expert...
 

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wow thread revival-

but yes- typically when you first start riding the most dangerous time is after the new experience thrill goes away and you get overconfident with your riding- so I'd say two to three months in- but that's just based off what I have witnessed- I didn't read the graph either LOL


I remember I asked a while ago- if we measured experience in miles- then at what mileage point do are you no longer a completely hazard to your self- I'd say when you have put on something like 3-5K you are climbing out of the over confident stage into the - actually riding phase. but that's my generic uneducated opinion :)
 

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wow thread revival-

but yes- typically when you first start riding the most dangerous time is after the new experience thrill goes away and you get overconfident with your riding- so I'd say two to three months in- but that's just based off what I have witnessed- I didn't read the graph either LOL


I remember I asked a while ago- if we measured experience in miles- then at what mileage point do are you no longer a completely hazard to your self- I'd say when you have put on something like 3-5K you are climbing out of the over confident stage into the - actually riding phase. but that's my generic uneducated opinion :)
The only reason I mentioned this, is because it was stated by the OP (and many other places on the forum) that the most dangerous time was the second and third year. I'm not saying I dispute this "fact" but the way I read the graph it supports a different conclusion. That in fact that people crash at 3 times the rate in the first year as they do in the second and third. Of course this says nothing for the severity of the crash.

I just thought it was interesting that someone posted a graph (which I hardly ever see anyone do around here, actually post facts to back themselves up) that supports a different conclusion than the one being talking about in the thread, but no one noticed...
 

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well since there are SO many variables its difficult to give scientific evidence. And around here the numbers are going to be skewed- we take a lot of pride in the fact we aren't weekend warriors- and that most of us ride our sport bikes like they were ment- or at least try too :)

In which case- most of us will crash further into the riding career- starting to hit twisties more often- harder and faster- so getting that confidence up and pushing a bit more.

Weekend warrior types are likely to be on the street- get going to fast and fuck something up- that happens a lot as a newb.

Different type of riding- yields different types of crashes- and its just really hard to quantify that.
 

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I just want to say that this is probably the best community on the internet. The advice is often sober and respectful, but stern. I pored through this forum for the first time in 2008 when I wanted to start riding, and then again in 2012, but both times I had to put off riding because of money and life issues. I finally picked up my first bike, a 2006 Honda Shadow VLX 600 and find myself back on these forums.

A friend of mine helped me by riding the bike home for me, and gave me plenty of advice. From reading this forum I could tell which advice was good and which was not:

He wanted to give me an old helmet of his, but I decided to pick up my own because who knows what abuse his old helmet went through, I learned that from this site.

He recommended I get a half or 3/4 helmet since I was picking up a cruiser, but this site had me settled on a full face helmet.

He rode my bike back in jeans, something I will never do thanks to this site.

He thought I should ride the bike for half the ride home to get a feel for it, but from reading this site I felt it was best to first practice in a parking lot instead of the road.

I made sure I had enough money for gear/leathers after buying the bike too.

There are so many helpful people here, you guys should be required reading for all new riders.


I decided with a cruiser over a 2012 Honda CBR250R because the seating position was more comfortable and the price was very right. In the near future I will pick up a sport bike and would love to take it to the track, but a cruiser seems like a better option for the road as I'm starting out.
 

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Sounds like you are doing it right.

Starting out on what fits and what works for you is far better than settling on a certain kind of bike and making yourself it it. There's a vast amount to learn, especially in the first six months or so of riding. Having to adapt to ergonomics that don't work very well gets in the way. Get the riding in traffic learning curve out of the way before moving to a different bike.

Going from a cruiser straight to a sportbike is a pretty big leap. The ergos are radically different. An intermediate step is a good idea, and probably a whole lot of fun if it's the right intermediate step. A standard or dual sport has more upright ergos than a cruiser or a sportbike and would make for a decent way to translate between the two. A bonus of a dual sport is playing in the dirt. You can't beat that for fun and for learning traction control.
 
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