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Discussion Starter #1
Could someone explain to me the difference between say the CBR F3, or F4i and whatever else there is as far as CBRs, is it just the years they were made?
 

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an increase in HP each year, usually a decrease in weight, F4i got fuel injection and a digital speedo/guage cluster. Also, the width of the rear tire increased between the F3 and F4 I believe.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So is it just 3 models? F3, F4, F4i?
 

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F2 to F3 got an adjustable rear shock(the last model F2 in 94 got it as well)
Rear rim width increased for the F3.
F3 to F4 went from a 160 to a 180 size tire.
F3 stopped being made in 98.
F2 started being made in 91 or 92.

First CBR 600(hurricane) was made in 87 or 88.
 

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Oh yeah, I forgot. Weight...the F3 gained about 3 pounds over the previous F2, but also gained a decent amount of power compared to it. It went from a 34mm to a 36mm carb intake, I believe, had weight savings done in the engine to make it rev easier.

Also between each model, the styling got a little bit different.
If you go to www.mcreports.com you can find more information about the different models.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
What year did it go from F4 to F4i?
 

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http://www.mcreports.com/Pages/Indivbikes/Honda/CBR600F2.html
HONDA CBR600F2, 1991-94
The solid reputation of the CBR600 continued with the introduction of the 'F2' model in 1991. Throughout its 4 year run, the CBR continued to be awarded top honours in most 600 comparison tests. It's combination of real-world ergonomics and high performance, as well as its string of victories on the track, combined to make the CBR the top seller in the 600 class. Compared with the CBR600 Hurricane it replaced, the new CBR was a totally revamped machine. The engine was reduced in size and weight, and made considerably more power. The bikes' styling was also updated, and made more aerodynamic. A new one-piece upper crankcase/cylinder assembly and revised camshaft drive layout were primarily responsible for the weight reductions in the engine department. The whole engine scales at 134lb's. A top end redesign featuring an all new combustion chamber, lighter pistons and carburized connecting rods took power at the crank up to 100bhp. The redline was increased by 1000rpm, and the valve angles altered. Larger intake ports and flat slide 34mm CV carbs added to the package. The frame geometry was revised, and the forks given spring load adjustment. Power in 1991 was a claimed 100bhp (about [email protected],500rpm at the rear wheel), with torque at [email protected],000rpm. Weight with a full tank is 453.5lb's

http://www.mcreports.com/Pages/Indivbikes/Honda/CBR600F3.html
HONDA CBR600F3, 1995-1998
The F2 was certainly a cosmic leap forward from the CBR600 Hurricane it replaced. The F3 on the other hand, was more of an 'evolution' from the F2. Certainly any F2 owner would be very familiar with many of the components utilized on the F3. Honda clearly did not want to meddle with a winning formula too much, and were careful to keep the price within range. The refinements for the F3 started with the engine. The carbs went from 34mm to 36mm, the intake tracts were shortened, the exhaust was redesigned, ram air ducts were added, and internal engine friction was reduced. The end result is more power and better fuel economy. The new fairing design is more 'racey', and a new, RC45 like radiator aids cooling. The new floating brakes increased in diameter, and the rear wheel grew to 5 inches. The swingarm pivots and triple clamps were beefed up to cope with extra cornering forces. The F3 weighs about the same as the F2, at 458lb's wet. Power at the rear wheel is [email protected],000rpm, with torque of 42.8lb/[email protected],000rpm.

http://www.mcreports.com/Pages/Indivbikes/Honda/CBR600F4.html
HONDA CBR600F4, 1999-2000
The rumor mill slated the F4 to be fuel injected, but it was not to be. Honda wanted to revolutionize the machine, without changing its basic personality, which had proved so successful over the years. Many of the technologies applied to the new VFR, VTR and CBR-XX were also used on the F4. The engine was completely redesigned, with even more oversquare dimensions allowing it to rev higher. Breathing was improved with a larger airbox and carbs, and the ignition remapped. A brand new aluminum frame and swingarm, as well as the engine mods, saved the F4 a huge 33lbs over the F3. Many other improvements add to the package, making the F4 the bike to beat on the tracks and in the showrooms. Power is [email protected],700rpm, with torque of 43.3ft/[email protected],300rpm. Wet weight is 435lb's.
 

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There are technically 6
Hurricane
F1
F2
F3
F4
F4i

The Hurricane was the first CBR600 in 87, then it was called the F1 between 88 and 90.
F2 = 91-94
F3 = 95-98
F4 = 99-00
F4i = 01-present
 

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great info paul, i could not have said it better...since i'm a huge fan of cbr's i love honda bikes...but hate the cars...go figure...
 

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I am pretty much the same way. The bikes are great, but the cars just don't do it for me. I have a friend that is obsessed with Honda cars and I just don't get it. They are just your average run of the mill car to me. Ah well, to each his own.
 

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To add to Paul's info here's what a site says about the change from the F4 to the F4i model:

http://www.motorsports-network.com/honda/2001MC/F4itrack/f4itrack.htm

Honda knew that merely continuing to offer what was arguably the best all around 600 on the planet might not be enough to continue generating strong sales numbers, so the decision was made to focus on boosting the F4's performance while basically leaving the comfort of the bike alone.

The 370 pound (dry) F4i is not a totally new bike, rather a heavily modified F4 with numerous engine, chassis and bodywork changes. The single largest change, other than styling, is the addition of high-pressure (50psi) programmed fuel injection - thus the model designation "F4i". Fuel injection allows for more precise fuel metering and delivery over a wider rpm range, while providing better throttle response and decreasing the ever important emission levels.

Additional engine changes include a lighter cam shaft sprocket and increased valve spring pressure (two springs per intake valve) which allow for higher revving. There are new piston rings that slide with less friction and increased internal engine oil flow. Honda claims the revamped engine puts out 5% more peak horsepower; redline is now 14,200 rpm, 700 rpm higher than last years F4.

The F4i isn't designed just to rev higher, as the engineers at Honda wanted increased top end power out of the liquid-cooled DOHC 16-valve engine without sacrificing low-end and mid-range torque. Ringing more power out of an engine means you must bring in more air. More airflow means greater intake noise, something that's hard to deal with considering the current noise regulations. The answer for Honda came by way of a two-stage ram-air system utilizing resonator chambers fitted to the plastic air intake ducts.

To increase the bikes pulling capabilities at high speeds, 5th and 6th gears have been shortened slightly and the rear sprocket was enlarged from 45 teeth to 46.

The California model possesses slightly different ignition mapping and utilizes a catalyzer in the exhaust system to help the bike meet 2004 emissions standards. Two horsepower are sacrificed in the process.

The aluminum twin-spar frame was made more rigid to improve the F4s handling as well as to increase feedback to the rider. Other rolling chassis changes focused on reducing unsprung weight and increasing the rigidity of individual components. Over a pound was taken off the front wheel assembly, with about 300 grams taken off the 3.5 x 17 inch wheel itself. The wheel bearings were moved outward, closer to the fork tubes and the rotor carriers were moved out closer to the brake calipers - all to reduce weight and to improve rigidity of the pieces. Weight was also taken off the 5.5 x 17 rear wheel assembly, nearly 2 1/2 pounds. The rear cush drive was also redesigned for less lash and a more direct feel.

The F4i's new bodywork carries a more racy look and slips through the air with a 3% reduction in COD. It also houses a new dual headlight design which uses 40% brighter H7 bulbs. The turn stalks are shorter and the mirrors are now positioned higher and closer to the rider so you don't feel like you're looking across an ocean to view them. Storage has been added under the rear seat, though the seat doesn't cleverly flip up like on the 929RR.

The elimination of carburetors allowed for a slightly larger air box and a larger fuel tank (4.8 us gallons / incl. 0.9 reserve) complete with a delayed fuel level sensor to fight against false readings when the bike is leaned over. One silly new feature is an amber shift indicator. We know where our eyes should be when riding, do you?
Other interesting info there too:

Who would you like developing your next sportbike?
Mr. Hiroyuki Ito, the F4i Large Project Leader, has 25 years of experience working on a wide variety of Honda motorcycle projects. Mr. Ito was also a top racer in Japan, finishing as high as second overall at the 1982 Suzuka Eight-Hour on a Honda race bike of his own design, dubbed the RS1000.
 

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i still think the f4i is the best looking honda sportbike. it just looks muscular
 

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I almost got an F4i, but the 6R was cheaper.
 

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since you guys seem to know alot about the f series maybe you can help. i'm building a 96 f3 street fighter, the only problem is the bike will not run out of 1st gear withou the guage cluster plugged in. i've tried everything. i've looked over the wiring scematic and can't figure it out. there are 2 main plugs that run every thing. according to the diagram the only thing pluged into the cdi is the tach. but if i leave the tach plugged in and unplug everything else it still does the same thing. i bought a daytona digital tach to use and a speedo and would like to use them
 

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boostnsrt said:
since you guys seem to know alot about the f series maybe you can help. i'm building a 96 f3 street fighter, the only problem is the bike will not run out of 1st gear withou the guage cluster plugged in. i've tried everything. i've looked over the wiring scematic and can't figure it out. there are 2 main plugs that run every thing. according to the diagram the only thing pluged into the cdi is the tach. but if i leave the tach plugged in and unplug everything else it still does the same thing. i bought a daytona digital tach to use and a speedo and would like to use them
u have to connect two connections together. its should be a large size connection and clip - i didn't this to my streetfighter F2. thats all u need to do just connect that and u're ready to go no bypass or anything.
 
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