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Discussion Starter #1
I've seen videos of a few (and they all ended in disaster) - I was wondering what exactly causes them? How do you recover?
 

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On the bike I ride now, I've seen it happen to my bf twice. It scared the shit out of both of us each time too! Not coming down straight is the major cause of tank slapping I think. On the 929 we thought that most of the factor was uneven forks. Once he added fluid to make them even it didn't happen any more, not sure if that was the cause though. Here's what he said about how he recovered: First he shit his pants, his ass clenched the seat, and his arms gripped and locked trying to keep the tire straight. lol
Having a steering damper will greatly decrease the chance of a tank slapper. He has one on his 954 and he's had no problems. I hope I never have to go through a tank slap though!
 

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Procrastinator
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Surface imperfections, the front wheel getting light under power and landing wheelies when the front wheel has slowed significantly or is not straight can all cause tankslappers. Aggressive steering geometry contributes to the situation.

The best thing to do is relax your grip and ride it out, but that's generally not what comes to mind when the bars are trying to break your wrists, and if it's heavy enough, it'll spit you off anyway.
 

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Head Rooster
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FunkLord said:
It's when you let go of the handlebars, raise one hand in the air, yell "yeeeeeee-haaaw" and slap the tank with the other hand.

:lao
 

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Ever get the buggy at the grocery store with the wobbly wheel? Well, that's a tank slapper. The front geomtry of a motorcycle acts like a castor. So when the direction of rotation gets too far from the direction of travel, the geometry of the front tries to get everything back in line. At moderate or high speeds it does this very rapid. Thus violently shacking the bars back and forth until things get back in line.

The best way to recover is also the hardest thing to do. That is to relax your grip and upper body and let the bike do what it needs.

B
 

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madman748 said:
Ever get the buggy at the grocery store with the wobbly wheel? Well, that's a tank slapper. The front geomtry of a motorcycle acts like a castor. So when the direction of rotation gets too far from the direction of travel, the geometry of the front tries to get everything back in line. At moderate or high speeds it does this very rapid. Thus violently shacking the bars back and forth until things get back in line.

The best way to recover is also the hardest thing to do. That is to relax your grip and upper body and let the bike do what it needs.

B
Exactly. It happens when the front wheel touches down out-of-line with the rear wheel.
 

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You got that right.
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madman748 said:
The best way to recover is also the hardest thing to do. That is to relax your grip and upper body and let the bike do what it needs.
I believe MSF also says something about changing speed. Don't throttle or brake if you don't have do in that situation.
 

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mikem317 said:
I believe MSF also says something about changing speed. Don't throttle or brake if you don't have do in that situation.
Your correct. I forgot.

K
 
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