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Discussion Starter #1
A lot of people learn first, and then do it. Me? I learn by doing it. First Bike, didnt really learn first. .

(H2Omax1 at the dealer) "OOH. . that yellow one looks fast, I want that One" :grinbounc

Jet Skis. . .
Seller: "Have you ever owned one of these before?"
H2Omax1: "No, but they look really fun. . .I'll take 'em!"

And then learn the hard way: "You mean I was supposed to drain the gas and flush the jet pumps before winter?" :nuts

So this time, I figured I would ask first. . . I'm thinking about making my F3 a track bike. Having NEVER raced and knowing not all that much about mods (yes, my F4i is 100% stock even after 2 years) What should I consider doing? The F3 is in good shape now, (except for rash on the plastics and a slightly bent brake lever). Other than that, it's stock. Where do I go from here? Goal is to do it with minimal funds. (Why buy an exhaust if I can hacksaw at the headers? :cool: )

(. . . or maybe I should just keep it at 55 :rolleyes )
 

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I'd go with a trackday class, then good tires, then suspension, then another class, then a couple more trackdays...then start some horsepower mods...
 

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You don't need any mods. Just get the suspension setup for your weight, and riding style. Put a set of rennsports on it. And ride that bitch like you stole it!
 

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Meh2u said:
Track days are expensive...
Pffp... riding a full day on the track is more fun than a full year on the street.
It doesn't cost that much for all you get.
With most clubs you'll get expert advice and instruction, suspension setup advice, corner workers and track marshalls, on sight EMS... and the most fun you'll ever have on two wheels.

Just make sure your tires, brakes and suspension are all in good shape. Do it!
 

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jk750 said:
Pffp... riding a full day on the track is more fun than a full year on the street.
It doesn't cost that much for all you get.
With most clubs you'll get expert advice and instruction, suspension setup advice, corner workers and track marshalls, on sight EMS... and the most fun you'll ever have on two wheels.

Just make sure your tires, brakes and suspension are all in good shape. Do it!
Worth every penny and more. A lot of times, it's cheaper than the MSF, and you learn so much more. (though you only take the MSF once)...
 

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Anti-Hero said:
You don't need any mods. Just get the suspension setup for your weight, and riding style. Put a set of rennsports on it. And ride that bitch like you stole it!
ditto...

If you have never done a track day improving your skills will make a b***** difference than ANYTHING you do to your bike. But do get the suspension setup...you could probably do this yourself by researching online, but I got mine done for $20 by racetech at the track.

Worry about moding your bike after you have done a few track days.
 

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H2Omax1. Are you going to Mid-Ohio? Are you going threw STT?
 

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Never racing before and being really interested my self this topic makes me wonder. I have read to death about set ups and what to mod etc etc. But like said eirlier "set the suspension to your weight, and riding style" but if you have never raced before you don't really have a style correct? any advice on how to determine a "riding style"?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Great point Josh. I dont know where the suspension should be set. What are the advantages of hard Vs. Soft. Also, for tires, I have a set of Metzler M1's on my F4i, which I love. Are these a good track tire to use, or should I get race tires?

Blurbo, I'm thinking Mid-Ohio, but I dont know what STT is. I've never been to either.

So is this a better use for the bike than getting a huge sprocket and a wheelie bar? :grinbounc
 

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hard soft depends on your riding style. when told, "get your suspension set up for your weight" they mean getting the correct amount of suspension sag for your weight. basically meaning getting preload set so the bike is neither undersprung ( not enough preload ) or over sprung (too much preload) after getting the sag set you adjust compression and rebound damping for your style and abilty. a person who is a hard braker may wants some more compression damping to keep the front end compliant. a person who is not hard onteh brakes may want less compression damping because they aren't using all of their suspension travel on braking.

we could go on and one but until you get out there someof this is not going to make fuck-all sense.

the important things is making sure the bike is safe. remove, tape teh lights. pull off the kickstand (yes, take it off) safety wire the oil fill cap, filter and drain bolt. (some groups don't require it but it is a good thing to do) drain the radiator adn fill with distilled water and water wetter. (anti freeze is just as slippery as oil if spilled)

get a good set of tires. they don't have to be race tires but should be something sporty. none of those long life/minimal wear or OEM tires. a good set of brake pads and braided lines wouldn't hurt but aren't required. there is a good article on Sportrider.com about setting up suspension sag. you can also do it at the track too.
 
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