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hey all again, i am taking my MVS course today :headbang (woohoo) and afterwords i jsut wanted to know what all you ppl thing of starting off with a sv650s since it places the power differently then all the sportbikes out there. i been looking into this bike for a while now and many say that this is also a good beginner bike but there are also some that disagree, so just wanted to know what all of you think about it since i know 2 ppl that are willing to sell this bike in my area
 

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Its a great bike but has enough power to get you in trouble if you arent careful. Its a really close call to say this is a good beginner bike because only you and your instructor know how well you did in the MSF and if you are ready for this bike.

I think most would agree that you could do a lot worse in picking a bike.
 

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If you like that type, look into the GS500 by Suzuki first. Its lighter, more agile and just as nice a ride. Beginnerbikes.com doesn't sugges tthe 650s as a first bike...and since i know several who do own one, I kinda agree with that assessment.
 

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agreed, i think the ex500 is the most suitable beg. bike.
 

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You could choose a better bike, but you could certainly choose a worse one to start out on. I would place the SV650 on the better end of the spectrum as far as beginner bikes go.
 

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I got one and I love it. The instructor at the MSF suggested it to me actually.

The things that will amke this bike hard to start on:

-A ton of torque down low. I'd been on plenty of dirtbikes and an EX500, and this thing pulls so hard all the way up too 8-9k RPM. Now this makes the bike a lot of fun, but if you slip on the throttle or clutch (I did) your tire may skip and kickout, and if you're not expecting it, it will buck you off pretty quick.

-Soft suspension and touchy brakes. Not very difficult to get the ass end of this bike up in the air with too much braking.

-Engine braking. If you roll off the throttle the engine starts to slow you down real quick. This can upset your line in a turn, plus if you're not used to it, you may find cars almost hitting you cause you're slowing down without your brake lights going on. If you're banging down the gears and let the clutch out in a gear too low for the roadspeed, your back tire is gonna do a really big skid, and it'll scare the crap out of you.

However this bike has been the best possible starter bike for me. Put soooo many miles on her now (lost count actually), and ride the twisties every weekend. The bike is very forgiving for it's size and specs, and the Vtwin engine, once you get used to it, is very confidence inspiring.

It costs much less to insure than a regular sportbike (since it's considered "Sport-tourer) and not a bike you're going to be able to ride to it's limit very quickly at all.

So:

If you've been on a bike before, or you feel very comfortable at the MSF.. the SV650S is the best bike in the history of the world. Seriously.
 

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I took the MSF course and have had an SV for about a month now as my first bike. I'd pretty much echo every thing Matt said above. It's a great bike but you better be careful with letting the clutch out too fast. I also think that the rider position of the SV is better than that of the SVS to start on. Oh yeah, most importantly, wear gear!
 

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I think the SV650 makes a fairly decent beginner's bike. However I'd opt for a cheaper GS500 or maybe a Seca 400. Just buy a cheap beater bike to learn on then go from there.

M.
 

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I started on an sv 4 years and 36k miles ago after taking a safety/training class (not MSF, but private). It was a little scary at first, but still great now. In retrospect, I probably would have developed better riding skills sooner on a 500. I know lots of other sv (or svs) riders who have them as their 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th or whatever bike. What everybody else has said is all true. It all depends on you. BTW, I'm WAY older than you and have very highly developed death/injury avoidance instincts. I've still enjoyed a couple of track days on the sv in addition to riding the twisties every chance I get. See how you feel about it after MSF (good job for taking it).
 

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RayOSV said:
I started on an sv 4 years and 36k miles ago after taking a safety/training class (not MSF, but private). It was a little scary at first, but still great now. In retrospect, I probably would have developed better riding skills sooner on a 500. I know lots of other sv (or svs) riders who have them as their 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th or whatever bike. What everybody else has said is all true. It all depends on you. BTW, I'm WAY older than you and have very highly developed death/injury avoidance instincts. I've still enjoyed a couple of track days on the sv in addition to riding the twisties every chance I get. See how you feel about it after MSF (good job for taking it).
The problem with instincts is that on a motorcycle they tend to make you do the wrong thing unless you specifically train them to do otherwise. The only way to train your instincts on a motorcycle is through practice riding a motorcycle. So in this case, no matter what the age, a new rider is a new rider.
 

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Mykl said:
The problem with instincts is that on a motorcycle they tend to make you do the wrong thing unless you specifically train them to do otherwise. The only way to train your instincts on a motorcycle is through practice riding a motorcycle. So in this case, no matter what the age, a new rider is a new rider.
I know what you mean. I spent a lot of time "practicing" (parking lot and on the road) and reading Twist of the Wrist 2 etc. My point is that I started at an "old" age and probably would have learned faster on a 500. I'm totally comfortable where I am now and don't worry about totally getting rid of chicken strips any more. :)
 

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RayOSV said:
I know what you mean. I spent a lot of time "practicing" (parking lot and on the road) and reading Twist of the Wrist 2 etc. My point is that I started at an "old" age and probably would have learned faster on a 500. I'm totally comfortable where I am now and don't worry about totally getting rid of chicken strips any more. :)
:dunno

I guess I don't really think it's necessary to justify your choice of a first bike in such a way. Personally, I think the SV650 is a great bike to start out on. It can be a bit dangerous to the completely untrained rider, but to somebody who's actually practiced and received some instruction it's certainly just as good as anything else.
 

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RayOSV said:
I know what you mean. I spent a lot of time "practicing" (parking lot and on the road) and reading Twist of the Wrist 2 etc. My point is that I started at an "old" age and probably would have learned faster on a 500. I'm totally comfortable where I am now and don't worry about totally getting rid of chicken strips any more. :)
If you read the Twist of The Wrist series of books then you know all about SR's (survival reactions). This is what gets racers and street riders into trouble alot. The better you can control your bike the less dramatic the effects of the SR's will be. This is one of the reasons to start smaller, gives you more room for error in emergency situations. I do believe an SV650S is the MOST that any newbie should consider getting, I still reccomend the EX500 as a first bike though. I've done some laps on a friend's SV650 race bike, great bike, very manageable and predictable power, I really liked it, if I wasn't so in love with two strokes I might even consider building one as a racebike. Hell, I might anyways, that would be something nice to have in my garage, my Aprilia race bike sitting next to a fully prepped SV650 race bike =D
 

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MattLikesBikes said:
Engine braking. If you roll off the throttle the engine starts to slow you down real quick. This can upset your line in a turn.
Remember for sure that you should be off throttle before the turn and smoothly rolling the throttle on throughout the turn. If you are riding correctly you won't roll off the throttle mid turn, unless you have an obstacle to avoid, in which case, you want your line to change.

Anyway, as many have said, it isn't the perfect bike to start on, but you could do way worse.
 

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I have an SV650s now, and if it tells you anything, I'm thinking about getting a SV650 to go along with it as a street/trackday bike. I started on a '94 GS500 that I got for $2200. I'm glad I did. You will be a better rider starting on something older, smaller, and naked. (I wonder what people would think if they heard that sentence out of context?) Knowing that I didn't pay much for the bike, and that it already had a few dings and scratches on it allowed me to concentrate on learning to be a better rider, and not having to worry about the bike in case of a fall. I was scared enough riding my beautiful silver SVs home from the dealership. I can't imagine how worried I would have been if it had been my first bike. Just my opinion. YRMV.
 

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Bad Habit said:
Remember for sure that you should be off throttle before the turn and smoothly rolling the throttle on throughout the turn. If you are riding correctly you won't roll off the throttle mid turn, unless you have an obstacle to avoid, in which case, you want your line to change.
Of course. However I learned this when I was very new (~1000 miles), and I was getting closer and closer too the centerline.. Made this mistake of rolling off the throttle on the SV in 2rd gear, the bike stood itself up and refused to turn. I realized my mistake (thanks MSF) and slowly rolled back on, and luckily didn't cross over. I had done the same EXACT thing on my friend's EX500, when I was on my permit, and it didn't effect the turning nearly as much as the harder engine braking from the SV.

I was pointing this out, because on a b***** V-twin, throttle imputs are predictable but quite sensitive. You won't notice the effects of mistakes like this on a small parrallel twin as much as a big Vtwin, because of how the engines are configured.
 

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GREAT choice! I've always loved the look of the Suzuki SV650s. Light, nice low end torque, and a great price. I'm the type that believes that no matter what size the bike is, ANY cc bike can be dangerous if you push it too hard as a new rider. Whether it's a 250cc bike or a 1000cc bike, take it slow, know your limits, and you should be fine.

Ride SAFE!

Tom
 
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