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I bought an SV650 about 2 1/2 months ago after having it recommened to me by one of the instructors at the beginner's MSF course. I've put about 3 thousand miles on it since then in addition to taking the exp. rider's course and spending alot of time practicing in parking lots. This winter I plan on upgrading the suspension, but before I do I want to hear your thoughts on the SV650 as a beginner bike.

Personally I feel that the bike suits me well. I feel comortable with it's sitting position(6'4 and 250). The bike feels stable in corners as long as I'm smooth on the throttle. I have no problem with low speed manuvering(I was one of the only people to ace the figure 8 test in both the BRC and ERC). It seems to me that the bike is nimble with out being twitchy and that it has just the right amount of power.

I would like to know your opnion of the SV650 as a beginner bike, but please include your riding history and some justification for why you feel that way.

Additionally if I decide to keep this bike what suspension upgrades would you recommend? Like I said the bike has been real smooth in the turns, but I haven't really been pushing it. I want something I can depend on as my skill increases.

Finally that other thread about the turbo 'busa is a joke, if I pissed some people off I'm sorry. Don't take offense just use your sense of humor.
 

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One of the best bargains in motorcycling, the SV650 is, we feel, not suitable for most beginning riders. While the SV's 645cc V-twin engine delivers its 70 horsepower in a friendlier, smoother manner than, say, Suzuki's own Bandit 600, that much power can get you into trouble. Like Honda's 750 Nighthawk, though with more performance and agility, it makes a stellar second bike. Suzuki also offers a sportier version, with a half-fairing and lower handlebars, called the SV650S. Seat height: 31.7 inches.
http://www.beginnerbikes.com/guide/sv650.html

pretty much mirrors my opinion.......
 

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I started on an sv a little over 4 years ago. It was a bit much at first and every so often for several months. I'm an OLDER rider and started riding seriously later in life. Now (36k miles and 2 track days later) it's great to the point of it being hard for me to justify a b***** bike. I would agree that it's probably the most bike a noob should try. Other than that, I'm gonna stay out of that debate.

I'm not sure about the '03/'04, but the earlier version was sprung for someone about 160 lbs max. The best front upgrade I've heard includes stiffer springs, heavier fork oil, and cartidge emulators at about $300-350 depending on if do the work yourself. At your weight, you might also consider a rear shock upgrade (Penske or ??).

www.svrider.com has lots of great info including a searchable database of upgrades.
 

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I got one as my first bike around March this year. Probably put around 4,000 miles on it so far (work,school,girlfriends blah.. I wish I could ride that much per month!)

The bike has been PERFECT for me. I rode dirtbikes when I was younger, and was already used to the controls on a bike. I also took the MSF course before I got my bike, the instructor actually recommended the SV for me, because he said I appeared very comfortable on a motorcycle.

My first impressions from riding the SV was more or less "HOLY SHIT THIS THING IS FAST." I still had a month before my permit expired so I couldn't get my full licence yet, so every day I'd practice in my Dad's neighborhood (which is pretty car-less for most of the day), and by the time I got out on the real roads I was quite comfortable with the power and engine braking.

My first couple times out on the street I'd get nervous at lights and stall it, or I'd let the clutch out a little too quick and the bike would jump forward and scare the crap out of me. However it NEVER lifted the front end on me without me wanting to (which came much later :D). The bike is definately more demanding to ride than an EX500 or 250.. but I'd say it's much more rider-friendly than my friend's 636.

I'm very comfortable on it now. I can put my knee on the ground pretty easily, ride it pretty much every day to work, and most weekends I'll go for a really long ride around and find some twisty roads. I'm always still learning on it though, every time I got out I come back knowing somthing new about the bike or riding in general. The good thing about the SV(S) is that it takes a very, very long time to be able to ride this bike to it's limits.. and the aftermarket for the bike is huge, so you can upgrade everything on it if you ever feel like you need somthing more.

I'm now helping teach my friend how to ride, and he just got a 2003 SV650 (which is actually a little quicker than my 2001 SV650S).. He was really scared of the bike before he took his MSF course, but now after he finished the class, he comes on rides with me and is really getting the basics down. So I'd say, if you feel comfortable on the bikes at the MSF course, and know your limits on a motorcycle, I'd say that an SV or SVS would be a good starter bike.
 

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The fourth bike I've owned is an SV650. I started with a 250 Rebel and moved up from there to a 750 Magna. I then bought a Triumph Sprint ST (955). Right now, I have the ST and the SV.

The SV is a better starter than a 600ss, but you can do much better.
 

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GREAT CHOICE!!

I got my motorcycle endorcement because of the SV650S. I always wanted to start riding and when I saw her I just HAD to have one. Well, I have my endorcement now but I never got a SV650. Katana 600.. Vulcan Classic 800.. FZR1000... oh well.

From all the reports I've read the SV650 is a highly regarded bike. Nice power but not too much oomph for a new rider. You'll never out grow the SV650.
 
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