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$100.00 for front and rear - good or not so good?

  • Not so good deal

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I haven't bought a new set in a looooong time and I came across a deal to buy front AND rear lines for $100.00 + shipping (approx $10.00).

So, the question is.............Good or bad price?
 

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A guy on a scruffy bike
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Why bother for the rear?
Some people are competent enough to use both brakes, and smart enough to do so. Using the rear brake well requires that you have a good feel for what's happening back there, so an upgraded brake line for the rear makes perfect sense to me. I went to the braided steel lines -- front brakes, rear brake, and clutch -- on my Duc 17 years ago, one of the first mods I made. It was worthwhile for all of them.

PhilB
 

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Sounds like a good deal to me. I didn't put steel lines on the rear of my sv thinking it wouldn't be worth it as I hardly use it, but now having them on the street triple I actually use the rear brake more often. It has a decent bite even with a single cylinder

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A guy on a scruffy bike
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Thats some pretty advanced shit right there. I figured anyone that far gone wouldn't be asking about the price of lines.
It is my understanding that L8 Braker is not a newbie rider.

PhilB
 

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Cheap Bastid
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Because I'm a way better rider and way smarter than any of you.
PhilB
Fixed.
Pretty sure this is what you meant to say, cuz that's exactly how it came out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It is my understanding that L8 Braker is not a newbie rider.
Definitely not new. Hell, Ive gotten so old that I've become too lazy to research the current prices of this paticular product. And I trust the SBN members opinions :)
 

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Cheap Bastid
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In some ways, going to SS lines is kinda like going to a quick throttle...

A quick throttle doesn't give the motor MORE power, it just makes the butterflies a little more responsive.

Similarly, SS lines don't really give the brakes MORE power (though in some cases it does), it makes them more responsive.

Dunno bout you guys but I've never thought to myself "Man, I could really use a more sensitive rear brake". I dont have the fine motor control, nor the sensitive touch in my foot to accurately or proficiently operate a light switch rear brake pedal.

Because of the physical differences in fine motor control and touch sensitivity between my hands and my feet, rear brake application feel isn't sensed through lever pressure, it's sensed through lever travel. I can tell how far I'm pushing the rear brake pedal down MUCH easier than I can tell how much pressure I'm putting on it.




With all that said, I don't have any problem with someone wanting to put a SS rear line on their bike... really doesn't matter to me. But if money is a concern and someone wants to save a few bucks & skip the rear line, I guarantee they won't notice much of a difference, if any difference at all.
 

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Thanks Pete. I was thinking the same but I certainly don't have the same credentials. Every time I've upgraded my brakes, I've thought about the rear and even talked to shops, and even shops have told me they thought it wasn't worth it. Imagine that, a shop passing up $.


As far as 'feedback', isn't the rear tire slipping (diagonally) the right feedback? Not being sarcastic or anything, but just how much 'feedback' can you get from the petal/lever? I get it that guys much better than me use the rear in turns but I've never heard of feedback or even using the rear significantly in high powered turns.

But yeah, they do come in kewl colorz n stuff. Me - I'm no longer worried about appearances n stuff. I have my stock mud flap (fender) and passenger pegs on my bike. No harm to my riding, daily or track days :)
 

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A guy on a scruffy bike
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Fixed.
Pretty sure this is what you meant to say, cuz that's exactly how it came out.
Whatever. I'm not responsible for your misinterpretations.

PhilB
 
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lol. Just sayin, Phil, that's pretty much how the first sentence of that post came out and that's kinda how you sound on the internet on a fairly regular basis.

You're a nice enough guy in person, dude, I got no problem with ya, but you have a very strong tendency to sound condescending when you get behind a keyboard and it's something you should probably be more aware of.

Don't mean to call ya out in public but sometimes that's what it takes to get the message accross. People don't like getting talked down to.


Shit, I come off the same way often enough, too but it's something I try to be careful about.
 

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In some ways, going to SS lines is kinda like going to a quick throttle...

A quick throttle doesn't give the motor MORE power, it just makes the butterflies a little more responsive.

Similarly, SS lines don't really give the brakes MORE power (though in some cases it does), it makes them more responsive.

Dunno bout you guys but I've never thought to myself "Man, I could really use a more sensitive rear brake". I dont have the fine motor control, nor the sensitive touch in my foot to accurately or proficiently operate a light switch rear brake pedal.

Because of the physical differences in fine motor control and touch sensitivity between my hands and my feet, rear brake application feel isn't sensed through lever pressure, it's sensed through lever travel. I can tell how far I'm pushing the rear brake pedal down MUCH easier than I can tell how much pressure I'm putting on it.




With all that said, I don't have any problem with someone wanting to put a SS rear line on their bike... really doesn't matter to me. But if money is a concern and someone wants to save a few bucks & skip the rear line, I guarantee they won't notice much of a difference, if any difference at all.
I would say in most cases you get more power with steel lines, especially if your rubber lines are getting old. Also, I'm pretty sure you have to use more pressure to get more travel in the lever, so they're basically the same thing.

100 bucks doesn't seem like a deal to pass up solely because you don't NEED rear lines. And that was one of the least "condescending" posts from Phil I've seen. Usually he just sounds like a (knowledgeable) geezer. Keep the butthurt in PnR

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I actually like most of his posts and wouldn't yank his chain as often if it wasnt for that definitely condescending tone he has at the default settings.
Drummer, if someones lines are old, that doesn't mean sst is the way to go. All im saying is thay it seems like overkill for most people. Im sure theres a casey stoner out there thay neds it but id say 99% of people just want it. And if price is a factor, I say skip it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Just to clarify for those wondering why I want the braided lines....

I've gotten the itch again so I'm getting back into the CCS racing circuit for a few races a year. I don't have the funds to do every race (never did really) but I can swing a few weekends a year.

So, these lines will be going on my race bike. :)
 

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Just to clarify for those wondering why I want the braided lines....

I've gotten the itch again so I'm getting back into the CCS racing circuit for a few races a year. I don't have the funds to do every race (never did really) but I can swing a few weekends a year.

So, these lines will be going on my race bike. :)
so...what you're saying is 'damn that pchbreeze hit the nail on the head again' :thankya
 

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I think I paid $80 for just the front on my Yamaha. I didn't do the rears on that bike but I really felt a difference in the front. My Triumph and Tuono came with steel front and rear so I can't compare them to stock, but they last a lot longer than rubber. Yamaha recommends replacing the rubber ones every 4 years.

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