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Discussion Starter #1
(for the uninformed, the "6 pot club" are folks that have bought typically used 6 pot calipers to replace their stock ones. Hayabusa's are a common donor, but there are others)

ABS model

Stock 2007 Sprint 4 pot brakes:




My 2004 Hayabusa 6 pot brakes I'll be installing:



 

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Discussion Starter #2
Okay, decided to go for it today when the brake pads came in. (Gafler TR-206543, sinterned race pads FD156)

My bike has ABS. There is a special procedure for bleeding ABS brakes that involves using the bike's computer and a handheld diagnostic/programmer.

This involved some risk, for if I couldn't do an install and standard bleed, the bike would be out of commission as I'd have to go to the shop.

The engineer in me felt I could do this w/out upsetting the ABS system.

I cleaned up the 2004 Hayabusa calipers as well as I could, since today's brake cleaner doesn't seem to cut much. I installed the new pads, then went to the bike

I removed the left caliper with the single brake line. I then mounted the new caliper and filled it with fluid through the open hole. I quickly removed and transfered the brake line and banjo bolt to the new caliper. At that point, I tried my old "pump it till you drop" method, but after a few minutes of little success, pulled out the $6 bleeder kit:



I got from the autoshop. This is basically just a bottle with a tube

I filled the bottle some w/Dot 4 fluid, put the tube on the bleeder screw and loosened it. Pumped some fluid through, refilling the resiervour as needed. Closed off the bleed screw and the lever was semi-solid feeling.

Okay, at this point I decided to do the other side before I continued bleeding. I repeated the same process on the right side, with the double lines on the banjo. I bleed it the same

With a semi-firm lever, I took it for a ride and did a break-in procedure with the pads. They took a bit, but broke in well and increased in power.

Toward the end of the ride, I tested the ABS and it was working.

So far, so good, but still had air in the lines, as evidenced by the lever going about 1/2 way to the handle bar, and it "pumping up" if I stroked it a few times.

Back to the "shop" and a quick bleed on both sides. Felt good, took it for another ride. Nice firm lever, good braking.

So far, I think I notice a good difference in the calipers. They seem more powerful than the stockers. Time will tell if they have the same stiction issue with the seals and pistons.

FYI - I reused the stock washers, no issues



 

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The new Triumphs don't come with steel lines from the factory anymore?


Sad..


Good mod, though!! I was going to do some brake upgrades on the Tona, but then went with the GSXR forks and have the radials now. Holy crap. HOLY crap. :dblthumb
 

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Discussion Starter #4
YES, they do, they are just plastic coated.

That's why I didn't upgrade the hoses.

Now, when I get some $$, that USD fork and radials are VERY tempting.


The new Triumphs don't come with steel lines from the factory anymore?


Sad..


Good mod, though!! I was going to do some brake upgrades on the Tona, but then went with the GSXR forks and have the radials now. Holy crap. HOLY crap. :dblthumb
 
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