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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
For two reasons;

1/ Sport-bikes have short wheelbases and a passenger makes the bike wheelie-prone, and the front end light and unstable. A passenger can easily fall off a powerful sport-bike.

2/ Because the sport-bike is designed to carry a passenger, the rear shock linkage must be designed with a steep rising-rate to handle a 400 lb + load on a bumpy road. This results in an average-weight solo rider's spine being hammered on a bumpy back-road once the suspension travel goes past the half-way mark. If a sport-bike is solo rider only, the shock linkage can be designed with a more linear rate for a rider 150-220 lbs. A much nicer ride over the b***** bumps and the rear wheel stays in better contact with the road.

I rarely see a sport-bike carrying two people so why are we putting up with the overly-stiff rear suspension? (and softer springs don't work) Even the sport-bike magazine testers often mention the stiff ride (rear shock) of a sport-bike on a bumpy road. SPORT-BIKES SHOULD BE DESIGNED FOR A SOLO RIDER ONLY allowing for a more linear shock linkage and a better ride on the street and race-tracks. Buy a Ninja 300 for the significant other. I ordered this for my Triumph STR along with the appropriate spring for my weight;

Kyle USA Linear Suspension Link for Triumph 675
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
My STR has a max payload of 420 lbs and this is why a steep 'rising rate' linkage is used on most sport-bikes that might carry a passenger. The result is a spine-hammering ride on the real world bumpy roads.

Again, softer springs don't work (you end up with mushy handling and the rough ride over big bumps is still there because of the rising rate linkage); the problem is the steep rising rate linkage designed for a load of 400 lbs or more. (Manufacturers assume the bike could have two 200 lb+ riders on it and they don't like being sued)

No one is whining here; the point is that designing sport bike shock linkage to carry a passenger results in much less than optimum ride compliance on real world streets and on the track. The linear linkage (with appropriate spring) is a HUGE improvement on the race-track, and the ride is much better on the street; the only proviso is that you can't have the extra weight of a passenger.
 

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If you don't like it, get a new spring for your weight and stop whining.
You can't fix linkage ratio with a spring (at least not any kind of normally available one).

My 2010 S1000RR had an incredibly steep rising rate linkage - my presumption is that it was a pigheaded Teutonic insistance that "ze bike WILL lap der Nurburgring mit einen frau strapped to der tailpiecegeplasticpart".

There was no fixing it - I went through two shocks, three revalvings, and two springs trying. Example - hit a regular round Bots dot - bike is great. Hit one of the taller square ones - feel like you ran over a brick, bouncing the bike all over the place. Finally, a year later, Lee's Cycle developed a revised linkage for their AMA race bike, and I got one for a ridiculous amount of money. Problem solved.

In the 2012 makeover BMW backed off the rate, I don't know how it is now.

KeS
 

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For two reasons;

1/ Sport-bikes have short wheelbases and a passenger makes the bike wheelie-prone, and the front end light and unstable. A passenger can easily fall off a powerful sport-bike.

2/ Because the sport-bike is designed to carry a passenger, the rear shock linkage must be designed with a steep rising-rate to handle a 400 lb + load on a bumpy road. This results in an average-weight solo rider's spine being hammered on a bumpy back-road once the suspension travel goes past the half-way mark. If a sport-bike is solo rider only, the shock linkage can be designed with a more linear rate for a rider 150-220 lbs. A much nicer ride over the b***** bumps and the rear wheel stays in better contact with the road.

I rarely see a sport-bike carrying two people so why are we putting up with the overly-stiff rear suspension? (and softer springs don't work) Even the sport-bike magazine testers often mention the stiff ride (rear shock) of a sport-bike on a bumpy road. SPORT-BIKES SHOULD BE DESIGNED FOR A SOLO RIDER ONLY allowing for a more linear shock linkage and a better ride on the street and race-tracks. Buy a Ninja 300 for the significant other. I ordered this for my Triumph STR along with the appropriate spring for my weight;

Kyle USA Linear Suspension Link for Triumph 675
400lbs? Either you are really fat or your gf is or you both are.




 

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roads in ym province are notoriously bad.
I run into leg cramps long before I run into back pain.

yer too old.
 

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roads in ym province are notoriously bad.
I run into leg cramps long before I run into back pain.

yer too old.
Or you're too fat.

You miss the part about the *race team* developing the alternate linkage? And that is more common than people realize. OP is 100% correct - having a weight capacity sufficient to carry a passenger significantly reduces the performance of the rear suspension for single riders of modern sport bikes with lever link suspensions.

KeS
 

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Nope. didn't miss a fucking thing. Thanks for assuming I did though.

I merely said that I didn't care.

and I don't. At all. let the race teams develop their shit and offer it if they want. you want it? Pay to play. in the real world, some of us DO need the help in getting laid, so we ride 2 up once in a while to impress dem wimminz.

:D
 

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For anyone on the street the stock setup will be more than ample. For someone serious about racing, the stock shock is going to be tossed for an aftermarket anyway.

I ride alot of 2 up(pardon my fiancé squidiness), but when i am solo I do not have a single issue



I find it funny that you are complaining about a STREETbike being sold with street performance minded parts.
 

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Some of us highly enjoy riding with a passenger, I have a passenger almost everytime I ride and I like her company and she isn't ready to start riding on her own yet so I do a ton of 2-up riding. When I know there are bumps coming up I just pick my ass up off the seat and bingo no spine crunching as my legs are absorbing the impact.

And I'm not skinny guy either I'm 240ish and my passenger is 110ish so that puts the 2 of us combined in the 350-360 range. Both my Daytona 675 and my Hyosung GT250r handle our combined weights just fine and I've never had any problems with either with spine crunching since I know how to use my legs to absorb my impacts.
 

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The OP makes some excellent points. It would be nice if there was a "non-passenger option" when buying a bike, so you could get a factory mono seat, pass peg delete, diff linkage and spring.
 

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The OP makes some excellent points. It would be nice if there was a "non-passenger option" when buying a bike, so you could get a factory mono seat, pass peg delete, diff linkage and spring.
Especially on my bike , it's a 250 single. Come on now, no passengers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
When a short-wheelbase sport-bike is carrying a passenger, it ceases to be a sport-bike. Really, if one carries a passenger all the time get a cruiser. IMO sport-bike rear suspension is seriously compromised when the linkage and spring are designed for a 400 lb+ payload (like the previous pics!) both on the street and track, all because there is accommodation for a passenger that the vast majority of sport-bike riders never use. Sport-bike rear suspension should be designed for a 250 lb payload max with NO passenger pegs, and find out what it is like to fly down a road with the rear wheel sticking like glue over big bumps around corners and not be bucked out of the saddle.
 
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