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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those who haven't read my other thread, I purchased a 2006 R6 last Saturday. The bike is scratch free and only has 6,000 miles on it. The previous owner said he changed the oil every 1000 miles.

When I start from first gear I usually release the clutch to the friction zone and then apply enough throttle to take off smoothly (Usually around 1,500-2,500 RPM). As I almost get out of the friction zone, I feel the clutch plate slip as I fully disengage the clutch. It feels like the plates are skipping off each other. This happens when I keep the throttle and clutch slightly outside the friction zone (on the way to disengaging the clutch).

My question: Is this the "slipper clutch" doing its job so I have nothing to worry about? I've never rode a bike with a slipper clutch before. Should I just practice a more smooth take off or does my clutch need adjustment?

Also, in most gears, the shifting doesn't feel very smooth. It could the fact that I haven't familiarized myself with the bike completely but it could also be old oil and/or an abused tranny/clutch. I doubt a Ninja 250 had smoother shifting than an R6...

Owner said the bike was never stunted on. He works on cars/bikes. A nice guy so I believe what he said.

So, does the bike need an oil change?
New clutch? Do I need to learn to ride smoother?


Thanks!


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You may be releasing the clutch too slowly. I know on my 636 (has slipper clutch) whenever accelerating it doesn't jump or anything and I just kinda drop the clutch out, ignoring friction zone except for coming from a stop.
 

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For those who haven't read my other thread, I purchased a 2006 R6 last Saturday. The bike is scratch free and only has 6,000 miles on it. The previous owner said he changed the oil every 1000 miles.

When I start from first gear I usually release the clutch to the friction zone and then apply enough throttle to take off smoothly (Usually around 1,500-2,500 RPM). As I almost get out of the friction zone, I feel the clutch plate slip as I fully disengage the clutch. It feels like the plates are skipping off each other. This happens when I keep the throttle and clutch slightly outside the friction zone (on the way to disengaging the clutch).

My question: Is this the "slipper clutch" doing its job so I have nothing to worry about? I've never rode a bike with a slipper clutch before. Should I just practice a more smooth take off or does my clutch need adjustment?

Also, in most gears, the shifting doesn't feel very smooth. It could the fact that I haven't familiarized myself with the bike completely but it could also be old oil and/or an abused tranny/clutch. I doubt a Ninja 250 had smoother shifting than an R6...

Owner said the bike was never stunted on. He works on cars/bikes. A nice guy so I believe what he said.

So, does the bike need an oil change?
New clutch? Do I need to learn to ride smoother?


Thanks!


Sent from my iPhone using Motorcycle.com Free App
The slipper part of the clutch only comes into play on deceleration, not when taking off. You might just need to get used to the bike.
 

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Habitual line-stepper
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Yeah, slipper clutches don't feel any different when taking off.


Just for future reference.... you know when you let off the throttle and you get a lot of engine braking? That's the back wheel driving the engine.

On a slipper clutch, it only lets you transmit power one way. So the engine delivers power to the wheels, but when the wheels try to slow down the engine, it's like you are holding the clutch in and power doesn't get transmitted through.

Now, it's not like it completely disengages... it lets SOME power through. Like you're slipping the clutch. Hence the name.

Mechanically, there are several ways to accomplish this. I'm not going to get into that unless you're actually curious.

But basically, a slipper clutch is designed to make part-throttle situations smoother while you are in corner entry, and to help make downshifts smoother. And it does both really beautifully. I was pretty surprised at how much easier it was to be smooth the first time I rode a bike with one. And the aftermarket ones work even better than the OEM-style ones.


In short- change the oil, adjust the clutch cable, and have someone with a little more experience ride the bike around the parking lot and see if they notice anything. Could be that you're just not used to the new bike.

My bmw uses a dry, single plate clutch like on a car. Instead of a wet, multi plate clutch like a motorcycle. And it's hydraulic instead of cable operation. Talk about getting used to a new feeling.... geeze....

But man- it's smooth. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah, slipper clutches don't feel any different when taking off.


Just for future reference.... you know when you let off the throttle and you get a lot of engine braking? That's the back wheel driving the engine.

On a slipper clutch, it only lets you transmit power one way. So the engine delivers power to the wheels, but when the wheels try to slow down the engine, it's like you are holding the clutch in and power doesn't get transmitted through.

Now, it's not like it completely disengages... it lets SOME power through. Like you're slipping the clutch. Hence the name.

Mechanically, there are several ways to accomplish this. I'm not going to get into that unless you're actually curious.

But basically, a slipper clutch is designed to make part-throttle situations smoother while you are in corner entry, and to help make downshifts smoother. And it does both really beautifully. I was pretty surprised at how much easier it was to be smooth the first time I rode a bike with one. And the aftermarket ones work even better than the OEM-style ones.


In short- change the oil, adjust the clutch cable, and have someone with a little more experience ride the bike around the parking lot and see if they notice anything. Could be that you're just not used to the new bike.

My bmw uses a dry, single plate clutch like on a car. Instead of a wet, multi plate clutch like a motorcycle. And it's hydraulic instead of cable operation. Talk about getting used to a new feeling.... geeze....

But man- it's smooth. :)
Thanks! That was quite helpful. I was planning to do some research on the slipper clutch later. I'll just do some trial and error until I figure out how this bike likes to be ridden ;)


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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
UPDATE:

I've been riding the R6 now for about 2 weeks. I notice that when I shift into neutral and let out the clutch, there's a weird rubbing/shake feeling the clutch lever, and then, an extra constant vibration once the clutch lever is fully out.

While I'm riding, I feel the slight vibration when in gear and the clutch lever is fully disengaged. Whenever I pull the clutch lever in fully, I don't feel that vibration or weird rubbing sensation. As I said earlier in this thread, I still get the weird feeling from the clutch when I'm NOT coming out of the friction zone SMOOTHLY. There's a rub/bounce/skip feeling as the clutch connects to the transmission. I never felt that with my 250R which had more miles.

The only other bike I can compare this to is a Ninja 250R. The clutch felt totally different on the 250.

Is there an issue with the clutch or is this how all 600s work?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The only thing I can think of is clutch chatter from possible glazing of the clutch plates.
A local mechanic told me the clutch may have some wear. He adjusted the play which he said should solve the chatter problem but I still notice the vibration/chatter. Unfortunately, I need a new front tire and fork seal. :(
 

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Welcome to buying a used bike!

Three years ago, I made the mistake of buying a CBR sight unseen on Ebay. Last time I'll ever do that. When the bike shows up with fairings ziptied on, you know something's wrong. Wound up spending $1500 to get it up to par.

This summer, I bought a Triumph Daytona. "Mint" condition. Only though some idiot installed HID lights on it and it kept blowing fuses until I had the HIDs removed. And me being an idiot, I managed to break the plastic connection on the fuel pump opening and closing the gas tank all the time to change the fuse.
 

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A local mechanic told me the clutch may have some wear. He adjusted the play which he said should solve the chatter problem but I still notice the vibration/chatter. Unfortunately, I need a new front tire and fork seal. :(
You might be able to R&R the clutch and sand the plates to get rid of the chatter but personally, if I'm going to that much trouble I'm gonna replace them with new ones unless money is a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You might be able to R&R the clutch and sand the plates to get rid of the chatter but personally, if I'm going to that much trouble I'm gonna replace them with new ones unless money is a problem.
Is it possible that I'll change the clutch plate and the chatter will remain? Again, I'm new to motorcycle's so I'm having a hard time finding remedies for most problems.
 

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Is it possible that I'll change the clutch plate and the chatter will remain? Again, I'm new to motorcycle's so I'm having a hard time finding remedies for most problems.
As long as everything else is in good shape you should be OK. The fiber plates wear out over time, and you don't have that many miles on the bike for the whole clutch to be worn out, unless someone was real hard on it.
 

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It could also be that the steel discs in the clutch are warped. It happens when they get too hot and can cause some slight slipping or chattering under power. Basically the same as what causes the fiber discs to get glazed.

I'd go ahead and buy a new clutch if you are sure that the adjustment is correct. Around 150 bucks and about an hour or two to install. Not a big deal, but you need a nice 3/8" torque wrench, just fyi. Not a $20 harbor freight one.
 
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