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SBN's bad luck charm
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Yes, they're sexy, but can any real performance gains be had from these things? I've noticed them on an old Ducati and on the new MV Agusta 1000.

TIA!!
 

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My VFR has one (Honda has used this on the VFR's since the '80's) but it is strictly a styling exercise. It is actually heaver than a standard swingarm because of the extra material needed to achieve the rigidity. Ducati dropped it on the 999/749 to loose the weight I believe. It looks cool though.
 

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SBN's bad luck charm
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Discussion Starter #3
Ah ha...I kinda had a feeling weight would be playing a factor, but still...they are beautiful.
 

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RESIDENT ASSHOLE
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Sssa

When I worked for Muzzy's In the late 90's we used them for daytona and only daytona. The lightest weight we could get on the superbike was 368 lbs. Ten pounds heavier than a regular swingarm. That was a magnesium arm at that from RAM. The obvious advantage was quick tire changes. Doug Chandler's bike came in with a perfect half circle scribed into the arm from the footpeg bolt lightly rubbing it when the frame flexxed in the banking. This meant the swing arm was so rigid that it didnt flex with the frame. It is an argument between most of us high level builders on the issue of designed flex. Some of us believe it to be part of the suspension and other's like myself hate any flex. Kind of like progressive springs, why would you want something that couldnt tell you whats going on? Some additional info is that the biggest reason behind superbike forks besides the gimmicks, is that the larger diameter in the tubes keeps the front wheel from flexxing out of line from the bike. This should help out with the idea behind it. :)
 

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Chauncey said:
Yes, they're sexy, but can any real performance gains be had from these things? I've noticed them on an old Ducati and on the new MV Agusta 1000.

TIA!!
I was fortunate enough to source a Ducati Corse (small axle) magnesium swingarm (complete) and mount it on my 998R.

The Corse swingarm saved about 5.5 lbs of unsprung weight from the stock unit. Additionally, it is 25mm longer. When used in conjunction with the steeper steering angle, it effectively increases the wheelbase, moving more of the rider's weight over the front wheel. The end result is more high speed stability and the bike is less prone to wheelie under race conditions.

Another advantage (as stated) is quick rear wheel changes...and the sprocket and braking mechanisms stay on the swingarm. Also, you don't have to worry about wheel alignment.

However, with the Ducati unit, the chain is adjusted with a swingarm eccentric, which affects the ride height. So...you need to measure the ride height first, adjust the chain, then re-adjust the ride height (easy to do).

The double sided swingarms on the 999 series Ducati's probably weigh less...but the entire 999 bike weighs quite a bit more than the 998 series, so there is a trade off.
 
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