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While I had the side covers off yesterday I backed off the preload on the rear spring two clicks. Todays ride on the freeway was smoother that I expected. :lol
It was really kicking me hard before now it acts completely different with no kicking at all. My ride later will be a real test with the bumps in the freeway that direction usually turning me into a bobble head. :eek:

I'm interested in what anyone else has found to be their ideal setting.
FYI I'm almost 2/3rds the total gross weight limit with my boots on. :a2
 

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i have mine set on 4. there are 7 differant settings. it is set on 3 when you buy. i tried 2 but found it was too soft and unstable when cornering at higher speeds. i am 5, 11 and weight about 220 with gear. of course settings are differant for everyone depending on your size and what type of riding you do.
 

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I also have mine set on 4, but I haven't tried any other settings yet. I know the manual has some recommendations for what setting to use based on weight.
 

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I use #5... I am 200lbs. and 6' tall if that helps. I found it to be the best. I had tried #4 for a good while as well... Actually I had them set it to 4 when I picked it up.
 

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I'm 5'-10" and weigh 150 lbs. I usually have mine set on 3. I did some two up riding this morning and had it set on 6. After the ride (solo again) I left it set on 6 and I think I'm going to leave it there. The bike fills more stable and more responsive going into turns. The ride will be a little rough but my commute is only around 4 miles.

Any reason why I shouldn't do this?
 

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"Any reason why I shouldn't do this?"

Yeah, you need to allow for some sag so the suspension can extend, as well as compress. If you crank up the preload too much, your shock will top out while trying to keep the rear wheel in contact with the road. That can be a problem in bumpy corners (among other places).

The whole point of having adjustable preload is to be able to get the full range of suspension movement with varying loads on the bike. It's not intended to adjust the ride characteristics. Ideally, you'd set your preload so that you have the appropriate amount of sag for your weight. If you don't like how it rides at that point, get a different spring, or get a new shock that has adjustable damping.
 

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I weight almost 90Kgrms . I have tried both 4 and 5 (original at 3). I left 5 on as it seems more solid at high speed riding and only occasionaly at very bumby roads i return to 4 ...
 

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I've got mine on 3. Not sure what the roads are like in everybody else's corner of the world but they are pretty ordinary around here. I also prefer a soft undulating ride rather than a harsh kick in the pants.
 

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fraggle1 said:
"Any reason why I shouldn't do this?"

Yeah, you need to allow for some sag so the suspension can extend, as well as compress. If you crank up the preload too much, your shock will top out while trying to keep the rear wheel in contact with the road. That can be a problem in bumpy corners (among other places).

The whole point of having adjustable preload is to be able to get the full range of suspension movement with varying loads on the bike. It's not intended to adjust the ride characteristics. Ideally, you'd set your preload so that you have the appropriate amount of sag for your weight. If you don't like how it rides at that point, get a different spring, or get a new shock that has adjustable damping.
How much shock should be compressed when driver is on the bike? I mean, the idea of pre-load for rear spring is to adjust to the load, so shock could work properly, but how many millimeters or inches is that "ideal position"?

I think you have to measure it with three buddies: two holding your bike as you are sitting on it and one measuring.

Yours sincerely, Antti
 

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Yamaha should have at least put what the ideal weight of the rider to which notch setting it should be.. at least that would give me a guideline of how much to adjust when I ride two up. I'm no professional so I wouldn't have any idea.
 

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nig said:
About 30mm of rider sag.
Based on...
... what? :)

And measured...
... from where?

FZ6 has wheel travel of 130 millimeters / 5.12 inches and rear shock absorber travel of 50 millimeters / 1.97 inches.

I know, that in every bike there is only one, ideal, designed sag for every type of load (within capacity).

I quess, that 30% of sag is sometimes a good estimation, but I would like to know the ultimate fact.

Yours sincerely, Antti
 

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It's the same for pretty much every road bike. It equates to roughly 1/3 of the total travel so it has room to move in both directions, as mentioned above. For the rear you would measure on a vertical line starting at the center of the rear axle. If you can't find a reference point directly above it use a piece of tape on the bodywork.

On a stock rear suspension with limited adjustability, I'd just try some different settings out and see which you like. It could be that preloading the soft spring to the extent necessary to get the proper sag ends up overpowering the rebound damping and sends you pogo-ing.
 

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nig said:
It's the same for pretty much every road bike. It equates to roughly 1/3 of the total travel so it has room to move in both directions, as mentioned above.
Just to make sure:

1/3 of the total travel (130mm / 5.12 inches) is 43 mm / 1.7 inches.
So is it reasonable to meter sag in the range from 30 mm (as you mentioned before) to 43 mm, corresponding to the "preload clicks", and then just to test drive those settings???

(That soft spring issue is not problem with FZ6, at least when it's quite new).

If it is so, I'm done with this issue, and I thank you for your information.

Now I only need those three buddies...
;>))

Yours sincerely, Antti
 

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You could use a mirror and a yardstick attached to a stand, with one friend to spot you. :)
 

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I got the bike with it set to 3... I tried it at 6, and now it's at 4. I thought I'd try 5 as well but it seems good where it is. I'm around 230 with my gear and always ride solo. I think 3 or 4 is the right solo setting, depending on your weight.
 

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Thank everyone for posting your info/ideas.

I'm 230ish w. gear on as well. I've been riding it set to 3, and it has been just fine in the twisties, but recently I rode into a moderate to strong gusting cross-wind @ 65mph. I was leaning into the wind pretty hard to stay in my lane but a couple strong gusts and I noticed some front wheel traction loss. [Not fun... :2eek ]. Wondering if cranking up pre-load to 4 or 5 would help reduce front wheel traction loss in gusty cross winds, or would it just make the ride more harsh?

Also wondering if changing out front fork cartridge w. an after-market one would help.
 

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You think ? :pisson
 

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I'm 5'10 185 lbs. and I have found the #5 slot provides enough feedback for high speed and still soft enought that I am not uncompfortable.
 
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