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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've only driven a manual car about a decade ago for 5 minutes. :blush Now I'm getting the urge to actually learn how to do it. I'm going to take up a friend's offer to teach me, but I want to be somewhat prepared before doing so.

How does the skill transfer? Specifically, my concerns are regarding low speed techniques with a dry clutch in a car.

How slow do you have to be going before you hold in the clutch when approaching a stop?
How much feathering is proper for a dry clutch?
Shift down through each gear when slowing?
Anything else? - please advise me! :p
 

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It's essentially the same as riding a bike only your using your foot for the clutch and hand for gear shifter... Im sure someone will give better advice lol but yea basically abt the same

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I have a friend who learned to ride a motorcycle before he learned how to drive a manual transmission. He said trying to learn how to shift was awkward since he was so used to shifting with his foot, not his hand. May be different for you.

With a dry clutch you want to "feather" as little as possible. You should either be engaged or disengaged 99% of the time. If you smell something burning, you're feathering the clutch too much.

There is no ideal speed where you need to "hold in" the clutch. You can push the clutch in to stop at 100mph if you like. Engine braking is optional, and you don't have to downshift through every gear. Remember: cars with manual transmissions have brakes too. Four of them in fact...

Low speed maneuvering in a car is much more simple just by the fact that having four wheels means you won't tip over if you mess up. You may stall or give the car a little too much power and overshoot a turn, but that's why you learn in a big flat parking lot, just like you would with a motorcycle.

To get used to the clutch in the car find a slight incline and point the car up it. Without touching the gas, you can let the clutch out while taking your foot off the brake until the car moves forward. Then push the clutch in and roll backward. Then let the clutch out and move forward. You repeat without touching the gas or brake until you feel you have the hang of the release point. The same can be done on a slight decline using reverse.
 

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And you don't have to necessarily shift through each gear if coming to a stop... If you know your gonna come to a dead stop you can keep the clutch in and brake like normal and go from 4th to 1st or 3rd to 1st etc... Just dont put it in 1st n let of the clutch while your still going too fast as it's gonna over rev the motor and possibly lock the rear end up just like it would on a bike.

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I learned to drive a manual in a car. When I then rode my first dirt bikes and four wheelers, the skills transferred directly over. It took a bit of getting used to shifting with my foot and pulling the clutch in with my hand, but it's all basically the same fundamentally. I would assume that starting with a bike and then moving to a car will be just as painless. You already have the fundamentals down, and that's the hardest part about learning to drive a manual.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
To get used to the clutch in the car find a slight incline and point the car up it. Without touching the gas, you can let the clutch out while taking your foot off the brake until the car moves forward. Then push the clutch in and roll backward. Then let the clutch out and move forward. You repeat without touching the gas or brake until you feel you have the hang of the release point. The same can be done on a slight decline using reverse.
Is there such a thing as 'walking your bike using the friction zone' with a car or nonapplicable?

I remember reading something about using your clutch to stay put on an incline is a bad idea.

Are you feathering the clutch just a little longer to start on an incline, just like a bike, or what's the trick with the car on a hill?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
And you don't have to necessarily shift through each gear if coming to a stop... If you know your gonna come to a dead stop you can keep the clutch in and brake like normal and go from 4th to 1st or 3rd to 1st etc... Just dont put it in 1st n let of the clutch while your still going too fast as it's gonna over rev the motor and possibly lock the rear end up just like it would on a bike.
Can you also put it in neutral while slowing and when the light turns green, shift to the appropriate gear and go?
 

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Technically yes- you can but you don't want to do that in someone else's car or when you are just learning- it's a good way to fuck shit up.

Once you get comfortable with a vehicle and where it's comfortable shifting/optimal RMP range then you can play around with it. But I wouldn't right now if I were you.
My old truck did NOT like that in lower gears.... the car now just sounds bad because the engine is more pronounced- and I don't like the idea of kicking it to 5000 and above- I'm not famiilar enough with the turbo to know how that all plays out. So I just don't do it.

As long as you understand that if the clutch is out- the gears are engaged- and if the clutch is in the gears are disengaged- you shouldn't have too many problems.

that concept for some people it's really difficult- that as one goes in- the other is let out and vice versa- but if you can ride- then you understand that concept- it'll just be implimenting your foot donig the shfiting not the hand.
 

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a bike is natural to me and i can ride anything but a car is not the first time i drove a manual i fried the absolute fuck out my friends trans, so wasint universal skillz for me
 

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Is there such a thing as 'walking your bike using the friction zone' with a car or nonapplicable?

I remember reading something about using your clutch to stay put on an incline is a bad idea.

Are you feathering the clutch just a little longer to start on an incline, just like a bike, or what's the trick with the car on a hill?
Yea i wouldnt sit n feather the clutch while waiting in a red light... If ur on an incline keep clutch in and foot on the break... When your ready to go let the clutch out close to the feather point then quickly take your foot of the brake n release the clutch a little more while giving it a little gas n slowly feather it out until the clutch is completely engaged... Youll just have to learn the clutch on whatever car it is your driving... But essentially its the same as the bike

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Feathering is jerky. You wouldn't jam a part into a bench grinder. Slowly increase pressure until desired friction. Slow down and get the feel for it.
 

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I learned a manual on a bike (self taught entirely) and then a car. I'd tried to learn a manual as a teenager and didn't make it (my old man, who had the patience of a three year old, was trying to teach me) but I had no trouble picking it up after having ridden bikes for a few years.
 

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Feathering is jerky. You wouldn't jam a part into a bench grinder. Slowly increase pressure until desired friction. Slow down and get the feel for it.
If :feathering is jerky" we must have different definitions of feathering.
 

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R6 rupture just brought up that story from long ago where he drove his drunk ass friend home from the bar (about three quarters of a mile if I remember correctly) and he completely burned out the clutch... do we still believe it to be a fable

:goldstar

just because that smiley is fucking awesome.
 

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I learned to drive a manual on a car first. When I learned how to ride a motorcycle, it came naturally. Shifting a bike is easier to learn in my opinion than a car.
 

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Some people like to engine brake saying it saves the brakes. Well... brakes are cheaper than engines so I would rather save the engine :p You're not on a race track where your lap times are going to be reduced from brake fade.
 
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