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I'd say it depends on speed. If you're just cruising, do it normally. If you're at full tilt and dragging various body parts, I'd recommend not shifting. If you upset the balance of the bike while leaned that far over, it may set you on your side...
 

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generally recommended what stangman said, it is a lot better for you and your bike if you are set up before you start your curve. the whole idea is to keep the bike happy and generally speaking shifting in a curve is not going to do that.
 

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Stang Man said:
I'd say it depends on speed. If you're just cruising, do it normally. If you're at full tilt and dragging various body parts, I'd recommend not shifting. If you upset the balance of the bike while leaned that far over, it may set you on your side...
Bingo on what stangman said. The last thing you want to do mid corner is upset your suspension. Generally, you want to be in the *lowest gear possible that allows you to get on the gas without having to shift mid-corner. Unless your bike is setup for a GP shift pattern, shifting while leaned over can also result in your foot catching the pavement which could result in a fatal lowside/possible highside. This is why everyone emphasizes on being smooth on the throttle, when you are leaned over, you only have 2 small areas of contact patch, your tires.... too much gas causes the weight to distribute off the front tire towards the rear and could possibly wash out the front tire. Get all your shifting and braking done before you enter the turn. Take the time to setup your suspension YOURSELF, not only will you learn a great deal about how suspension operates on your motorcycle, but you'll also be able to feel the characteristics and differences applied to each setting.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
alright cool thanks guys

i was just on a turn today its kind of a quick left hander down hill after a light and i had to get out of second
 

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Ditto what everyone else has said. The key is to be smooth. If you can shift without causing dramatic (for the situation) suspension changes and without locking up the rear wheel and without dragging your foot, go for it. Match revs and be smooth with the clutch and there won't be any drama.

Same for braking. Some say NEVER brake in a turn. If you ease on the front brake to bleed off a little speed without upsetting anything, it's no big deal. You can even lean the bike over a little more to compensate for it wanting to stand upright. Just don't grap a fist full.

This all works better once you are to the point of NOT giving the bike inputs (brake, throttle, clutch, steering, etc.) that are too abrupt for the conditions. You can get away with a lot more at 6/10th's of you/bike's abilities than at 9/10th's.
 

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RayOSV said:
Ditto what everyone else has said. The key is to be smooth. If you can shift without causing dramatic (for the situation) suspension changes and without locking up the rear wheel and without dragging your foot, go for it. Match revs and be smooth with the clutch and there won't be any drama.

Same for braking. Some say NEVER brake in a turn. If you ease on the front brake to bleed off a little speed without upsetting anything, it's no big deal. You can even lean the bike over a little more to compensate for it wanting to stand upright. Just don't grap a fist full.

This all works better once you are to the point of NOT giving the bike inputs (brake, throttle, clutch, steering, etc.) that are too abrupt for the conditions. You can get away with a lot more at 6/10th's of you/bike's abilities than at 9/10th's.
+1, being smooth is definitely the key. When I started learning to ride, my friends and I used to "coast" through the twisties at a very moderate pace. Instead of gasing it through the straights and grabbing a hand full of brake before you entered the turn, coasting allows you to ride without the use of brakes and focuses on form, throttle control, weight distribution. You never have to worry about entering too hot, because you're not going fast to begin with. Today, we always tell new riders to practice being smooth first, the speed will come after that.
 

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Ditto on Smooth

Tip - In regular riding, make your shifts just above your TQ peak, quickly, using just a dab of clutch.

Scott :)
 

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To throw in my bit, I also try to keep a little power to the wheels as well in a gradual fashion. Smooth shift, smooth progression of acceleration exiting the corner to keep the bike planted.
 

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NoXeN said:
alright cool thanks guys

i was just on a turn today its kind of a quick left hander down hill after a light and i had to get out of second
HAD too? redlined in 2nd on a 600 puts you at what? ~70+? What was the speed limit on this street seeing as you went through a light getting to said curve?
 

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StagMan is correct. Basically I go in slow & come out fast. Even if I am going to use 4th or 5th gear on this bend I will ease off on the throttle which is the slow bit & then turn the wick up a bit as I keep the power on the rear wheel.

Yet if it is simply a nice long bend & you are cruising along then shifting is fine. Like I will go down to 5th, enjoy the bend & as I am pouring on the coal I will slip into 6th & let the engine settle the pace of the bike.
 
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