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I know there is already a thread on riding two up, but I'm wondering what you guys think is the proper exp./skill level required for safe riding with a passenger. Additionally if you have any tips or techniques I'd love to hear them.
 

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El A MC Rider
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Redlinger said:
I know there is already a thread on riding two up, but I'm wondering what you guys think is the proper exp./skill level required for safe riding with a passenger. Additionally if you have any tips or techniques I'd love to hear them.
The MSF Instructor told me six months, but I'd personally venture a year. Been riding for ten years and I'm just getting used to taking a passenger. Depends on your experience level, i.e., how comfortable you are with you bike, how much weight it can effectively handle suspension-wise, and your ability to control the bike with significant added weight.

Try taking your would-be passenger to a large parking lot to practice basic maneuvers (turning, braking, and becoming synchronous with your passenger or vice versa), just as if you were learning to ride all over again.
 

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Mostly you just need to be extra smooth, a little more careful at low speeds because the bike's more top heavy, and you have to allow some more distance for braking.

A tip for smoother shifting: Use just a dab of clutch at or just over the bike's torque peak. Pre-weight the shifter, and it should pop right into the next gear will very little drama. Klunking helmets suck....



General Tips -

- Have your passenger get on/off ONLY at your command.

- Have your passenger keep their weight OFF of your torso. Either by hanging onto your belt/waist or propping themselves against the tank. Doing weighted push ups all day SUCKS, and makes it difficult to be precice with the controls... If you do 2 up a lot, buying a "Buddy Belt" helps. Basically, it's a padded belt with handles.

- Your passenger should know to not move around on the seat while the bike is moving, and to keep a little weight on the pegs instead of merely sitting there.

- Teach your passenger what an apex is, and that (s)he should look over your inside shoulder at/past it while turning.

- If they need to stretch, ask that they do it at a light.


IN RETURN FOR YOUR PASSENGER'S COOPERATION

- Promise that you will NOT ride like an idiot. It's difficult to enjoy a ride when you're scared to death. Pull a wheelie 2 up and your passenger WILL fall off if (s)he's not prepared. Same with hard acceleration.

- Allow your passenger to have input as to the pace you're running. A tap on the leg and a palm up (faster is OK) or palm down (slow down, please) works, and your pillion partner will be MUCH happier if (s)he knows that their opinion counts.

- Check that (s)he's OK every now and again, and take a break when (s)he wants.

Before hooking up with your regular riding buddies, practice riding around just the two of you until you are used to it, and *know* that you will not keep up with the hooligans.

Scott :)
 

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You will be missed Shawn
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Scotteq said:
Mostly you just need to be extra smooth, a little more careful at low speeds because the bike's more top heavy, and you have to allow some more distance for braking.

A tip for smoother shifting: Use just a dab of clutch at or just over the bike's torque peak. Pre-weight the shifter, and it should pop right into the next gear will very little drama. Klunking helmets suck....



General Tips -

- Have your passenger get on/off ONLY at your command.

- Have your passenger keep their weight OFF of your torso. Either by hanging onto your belt/waist or propping themselves against the tank. Doing weighted push ups all day SUCKS, and makes it difficult to be precice with the controls... If you do 2 up a lot, buying a "Buddy Belt" helps. Basically, it's a padded belt with handles.

- Your passenger should know to not move around on the seat while the bike is moving, and to keep a little weight on the pegs instead of merely sitting there.

- Teach your passenger what an apex is, and that (s)he should look over your inside shoulder at/past it while turning.

- If they need to stretch, ask that they do it at a light.


IN RETURN FOR YOUR PASSENGER'S COOPERATION

- Promise that you will NOT ride like an idiot. It's difficult to enjoy a ride when you're scared to death. Pull a wheelie 2 up and your passenger WILL fall off if (s)he's not prepared. Same with hard acceleration.

- Allow your passenger to have input as to the pace you're running. A tap on the leg and a palm up (faster is OK) or palm down (slow down, please) works, and your pillion partner will be MUCH happier if (s)he knows that their opinion counts.

- Check that (s)he's OK every now and again, and take a break when (s)he wants.

Before hooking up with your regular riding buddies, practice riding around just the two of you until you are used to it, and *know* that you will not keep up with the hooligans.

Scott :)
you have raised some great points and tips here. thank you. I have recently added a passenger to my bike (this is then end of my second season) and basically from being a passenger before, I knew the things to tell my passenger. For the most part, mine has done exceptionally well, but your tips have given me a couple of things I need to discuss with her before the next time. I think I hit the rest of your tips already, thanks for the others I had forgotten or hadn't thought about yet.
 

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There is no hard and fast time.

You should be completely familiar with your bike, how it handles and what to expect on the street. Putting on some miles is the best way to get the feel for the machine.

Then it is just a matter of trying it out. It's not something you will learn from a book.

Remember that it takes two to tango- the passenger must learn the skillset for riding bitch. This was laid out by Scotteq very well.

Remember that with weight on the back, you lose steering agility, so you will have to hit corners slower and on a different line.
Most people riding two up crash on a corner. They go into the turn normally and find they can't hold a tight line, hit the curb and down they go.

The only way to learn it is to do it. Obviously start small and slow. It's not that difficult for the rider to get used to. But the passenger must know the rules.

Like a bobsled, you become a team. Working together on the bike.

Learn your bike and the road, then all you can do is try it out with a passenger.
 

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A lot of times passengers think that the best time to wiggle around, adjust their helmet, reach in their jacket, is just when you are coming to a stop. This has the nice effect of making you have to put a foot down way early and look like a total goon. You may want to tell them to do that crap when you are at speed or stoped, not in between. :)

Oh, and I'm still trying to not helmet clunk as much. I'll try that tip. Thanks! Is that tough on the tranny?
 

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It's also alot easier if u can firmly place both feet on the ground while sitting on the bike. If you can't dont even try a U-turn. Try and make your first passenger a light guy also....mine was a good friend whop weighed about 140, reason i did that is because i didnt know what to expect and i didnt want to drop the bike with a girl on the back, and try to find someone light since its quite noticable in turns between a heavy passenger and a light one.
 

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torok said:
Oh, and I'm still trying to not helmet clunk as much. I'll try that tip. Thanks! Is that tough on the tranny?

Do it right and it'll pop into the next gear like Buttah!!! :cool:

Scott :)
 

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ok, who farted?
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i hate it when she puts all her weight on me, my arms feel like theyre gonna fall off. its dangerous anyways. what's a helmet clunk? i know that everytime i try to lean my head back her helmet and mine go clunk...is that the same?
 

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Suzuki 3000GT
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All points seemed to be covered. Nice post Scotteq. :D
 

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hell, I've put over 150k on my bikes over the years and I still hate riding two up unless the person you are riding with knows how a bike handles. Like some of the others have already said make sure the passenger knows how to respond to your actions when riding.
 

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One of the best things to tell your passenger is when you're coming to a stop, they need to put one hand against the gas tank (it works on sport bikes at least) to hold their own weight, it takes a lot of stress off your arms.

Oh, and yeah, don't go into a turn to fast, the bike will slip out from under you, at least in a parking garage where its that slippery concrete, and then it hurts when you slide to a stop on your arm :eek:
 
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