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· what R you lookin' at?
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holy shit.......my lia alone is <$200 and i'm 37 and an inst. ,well consider yourself lucky, cuz thats the lowest i've ever heard for a liter bike.

but thats not the norm. call progressive or dairyland (hell DL won't even insure my VFR, let alone your R1) normally sportbike ins. is ALOT higher then standards or other "normal" bikes, why do you think that is?
 

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Racer is right on this one...I tried a quote from Progressive for full coverage. 28 years old at the time, MSF'ed, licensed, clean record. With a $1,000 deductible my quote came it at around $4,500. That would mean that if my bike was totalled I would be paying $5,500 to have a $6,500 bike replaced. And that was for a 600cc YZF-600R. Not an R1. Not even an R6. There is also more taken into account with most insurance companies than the size of the bike, type of bike and driving record of the rider. They also factor in things like age, marital status and the area in which the bike will be garaged.

As for everyone who says it's that crashing at 30 on an EX500 is the same as crashing at 30 on an R1, I have two things to point out. The first is that there are more ways to crash than while already moving. Making a slow 90 degree turn and the extra power and more sensitive throttle of an R1 is more likely to cause the back wheel to lose traction in the hands of an inexperienced rider. Not as likely with a smaller bike. Also, starting out from a stop, an inexperience rider (again due to the increased power of the bike) is more likely to flip a liter bike than a 500cc. I think we can all agree to those.

My second point is a REALLY big difference. The difference of about $6,000.
 

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State Farm's rates are low because in most states, they do not underwrite standalone motorcycle policies. You must carry other insurance through them to even get an M/C policy with them. Second, State Farm is rather selective about who they insure. Good credit, low loss history, etc. I have heard that State Farm will drop you quickly if you wreck a bike good. Not just anyone can get State Farm coverage so this limited pool keeps their rates low but also keeps them with a lower risk population in general.

Progressive is an insurance broker. They will literally insure anyone. Progressive insures people that no one else will touch. When people lose their State Farm coverage due to tickets, wrecks, etc, they go to Progressive. Progressive doesn't actually underwrite their own policies. They farm them out and act as the seller on their behalf. Your policy might say Progressive but they bought it from someone else. This explains why you get such wild rates with Progressive. High risk insurer. The rates reflect it.

I personally have State Farm coverage. 31 year old, married, no tickets or wrecks. $392/year for full coverage, theft, medical at 500/500/150 with under/uninsured coverage. Very good for a 7 year old 600SS. The highest quote I got that was binding was for a 2004 Buell XB12R and that was $511/year for the same coverage. Insuring a liter bike was a non-issue for me. A big cruiser cost more than an R1.
 

· what R you lookin' at?
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5,269 Posts
linuxbikr said:
A big cruiser cost more than an R1.
because state farm goes by cc and not classification.

had state farm also, went to geico, offer msf inst. discounts........
 

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Neverlose said:
The more experienced rider should always follow, so they can watch what the beginner is doing and tell him what mistakes he is making, also this way the beginner doesn't need to try and "keep up" with anyone if he can't.
also true, but I learned it how I sayed before and it worked well.
But the new rider doesn't know the road from the view of a bike and may need to get the lines and a "danger" or "slow down" hand signal can be a big help if you are new. A noob also never seams to nevernotice dose hand signals in the mirrors. And the experienced driver should be at least that experienced to know not to speed and go at a relativly slow pase, this way he can also keep back the "WOOOW I GOT A BIKE... BURN THE STREET" effect of the newcomer :D

The staggered formation is simply so he doesn't want to do the "Biker Boyz" style riding next to another and so that IF he crashes or somehow gets scared and accelerates or what ever he doesn't run into you.

I found that to be a good way of learning
 
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