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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
hey everyone, I have a 01 ZX9R and up to now i have ridden alone. well, my wife wants to go out with me on the bike since the weather is nice and all. but the suspension isnt set up right.

my bike is set up for one rider. can anyone tell me how to adjust the rear suspension to accomodate the extra 140 lbs.? i know that there are two adjustments, preload and compression. my other question would be; do i have to adjust the front comp. and preload also?

any help would be appreciated.

toozit
 

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It's probably going to take some playing around if you're obsessed with getting it perfect. Give it a try as-is just around the block. If you're going to be riding easy (I hope you are) your settings may be ok. Generally, you'll want to stiffen up the rear some so you won't sag. If you can get away with it, I'd leave the dampening settings (unless they're just too soft).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
not obsessed, just dont want the bike taking a dump with my ol'lady on it.
i notice whenever someone gets on the rear with me it just goes way down. id like to stiffen it up.

thanks for the reply.
toozit
 

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I posted this on another thread but here it is again. It suspension basics

The primary job of a motorcycle's suspension is to separate the chassis from the effects of bumps and other surface irregularities while simultaneously keeping the tires in contact with the road. Suspension systems have two theoretical components, springing and damping.

The spring controls how much force is required to compress the suspension and the damping controls how quickly the compression and subsequent decompression occurs.

The Preload adjustment determines the spring force. More preload, more required force to compress the spring. Less preload, less required force to compress the spring.

Compression damping controls the speed at which the spring is allowed to compress for a given force applied. More compression damping, the slower the spring can compress. Less compression damping, the faster it can respond. Rebound damping controls the speed at which the spring can rebound following compression. Again, more rebound damping means a slower spring decompression, less rebound damping means faster decompression.

Determining the optimum suspension settings for your bike is as much art as science and has to do with your physical characteristics and riding style as well as the physics of the motorcycle's design.


Personnally, I would set your rear spring preload to max and give the rebound and compression dampening and rebound dampening a few clicks higher. I would then move the front suspension to almost max on the spring preload and again put more dampening in it. Then do a test ride and see how it is. If you don't add more compression/rebound dampening the bike is going to feel its bouncing up and down too much.

140lbs is a big increase in weight considering the beginning wieght. Bike + you = about 675lbs +/- 30lbs (or there abouts) Now add 140 lbs and its up to about 815lbs or about a 20% increase. (I'm not saying your wife is fat by any means, my wife weighs 135 plus what ever her riding gear is)
 
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