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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've seen this done a variety of ways. Most of the DIY videos and web sites show the installer using 1 loop of wire around the grip groove and then using the safety wire pliers to twist the ends. Now, how many loops/how much of the twisted wires do we want to keep before smashing it back into the groove using a screw driver? Is it 1/8", 1/4" or?

How tight does it have to be? Enough to squish into the grip and deform it a little?

Looking at the MotoGP bikes, they are running two loops of wire around the grips (meaning, they seem to loop the wire twice around each groove). Does this provide additional securing of the grips?
 

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I have always used one loop around the grip, but two shouldn't be any better or worse. I safety-wire on both ends of the grip. I try to tighten down to the point that the grip starts to deform a bit, but nothing insane. You don't want to cut the grip either. I leave about a 1/4" of twisted safety wire at the end and I try to angle it so that tail goes into the grip, so if you're riding around the pits without gloves, you don't catch your fingers on it. I used a pair of wire cutters for this task instead of a screwdriver, but it's personal preference. I like to leave some length on the wire, so that way if you bend a bar or need to replace a throttle tube or something, can spin the wire open a bit to cut it off. I also try to twist towards the bottom of the grip. But it's a personal preference that I can't justify with a real reason for doing it.

One thing to look for is where your throttle grip ends compared to the throttle tube. Some throttle tubes get "modified" on racebikes. If that's the case, you should probably buy a new throttle tube. But don't safety wire the grip to the end of the clip-on.
 

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Are we not men?
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Two wraps is going to be harder to get tight and isn't really necessary. One wrap is just fine.
 

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I'm an aviation maintainer. I am a pro at safety wire..trust me..lol. Anyways I am interested in pictures of what you guys are doing and why.
 

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It's mainly just a fail-safe backup in case the grip glue securing the grip onto the bar fails. That way when going full whack with the throttle, you aren't just merely twisting the rotating rubber grip around the throttle tube thinking you're going full throttle when in fact it's only going xx% of its true travel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Here's a picture of how Casey Stoner had his throttle grip safety wired on the RC213V MotoGP bike.

I had a large spool of 0.020" T302/304 SS aviation safety lock wire. I ordered 0.025" and 0.032", might as well keep the common stuff handy in the future.
 

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Espacef1fan,
Last year at two different track days there were folks who lost oil filler caps! Thankfully no one was hurt but it got me thinking, even though at my level it's not required I went ahead and wired both mine and my wife's bike. To that end I wired the filler cap, drain plug and oil filter. And on my bike I drilled out the front caliper bolts and wired those, overkill for sure. For some reason during a track day I'm always checking them so it gives me one less thing to worry about. IMO unless your running track there is no need because your not blasting around at high RPM's all day unlike the street ( at least most of us:). I did a lot of safety wiring when I worked on engines in the air force, doing safety wire on a bike is child's play compared to aircraft, I'm sure you know what I mean.
 

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It's mainly just a fail-safe backup in case the grip glue securing the grip onto the bar fails. That way when going full whack with the throttle, you aren't just merely twisting the rotating rubber grip around the throttle tube thinking you're going full throttle when in fact it's only going xx% of its true travel.
Or that the grip doesn't come off in your hand.
 

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Either way will work really. i leave about 1/2" that i fold in half and then press into the grip with whatever flats surface i have available. makes it a little easier to get off as i have something to grab onto.
 
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