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I rock
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I'm planning on taking my bike (ZX) apart to get some custom stuff done to it...since I ll have all the plastic off...I was thinking the bike has almost 7k miles...should I replace the plugs,air filter,brake fluid and pads,coolant...etc...etc....also should I be concerned about valve adjustments...etc??? just trying to get it ready for another 7k miles w/o problems....
 

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you can always sell it and get a real bike
 

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Yeah like a Honda!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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I read somewhere that brake fluid goes to crap after just a few thousand miles. Not sure about the validity to that one (Snowman?)...

Air filter should definitely be cleaned out, plugs should be good for another few thousand, pads will likely need to be replaced, depending on the type/brand and how hard you ride (I had to replace the EX500's every 4000 miles, but they were crap pads), coolant should be good for another few thou as well. Valve adjustments vary among some bikes, my EX was after 16K if I remember correctly.

If you have an owner's manual, it will give you a very good idea of your bike's maintenance schedule, including what to inspect instead of outright replace. Remember that I've only had bikes for under 2 years (ie, not an expert,lol), but this is how I maintain mine and it's been working out for me.
 

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They call me a ride whore
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Man I've been such a slacker.... I need to do a bunch of this stuff too. Spark plugs and air filter are the ONLY things I've changed on my bike (other than normal oil changes/chain cleaning & lubing, and tires) in 24k miles. I've been meaning to flush all the fluids but just haven't had the time. Gotta get the valves adjusted soon too.

Anyways, I'd just look over everything real good and see what you might need. Flushing all the fluids never hurts anything! But check the brakes and see if they're low or not.... they may last quite awile (mine still have a good amount of meat on them). Valve adjustment and spark plugs you could probably wait a lil bit, mine is recommended at 16k for both
 

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fotocycle said:
I read somewhere that brake fluid goes to crap after just a few thousand miles. Not sure about the validity to that one (Snowman?)...
Brake fluid is hygroscopic, so it absorbs water. The more water it absorbs, the lower it's boiling point the worse it works. I normally flush mine brake fluid at least once a year. If I do a track event, I normally flush it afterwards (or if it's be a while, before and afterwards), it's cheap to do and makes a word of difference when it comes to braking performance. This is in regards to the car, I'd imagine it'd be the same for the motorcycle.
 

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I rock
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
well...I'm just saying...since i ll have the bike "open" no fairings..etc..I could take the time and do some of the little stuff....like plugs...etc...
 

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ALF/USA said:
well...I'm just saying...since i ll have the bike "open" no fairings..etc..I could take the time and do some of the little stuff....like plugs...etc...

Heroldmotorsports.com
 

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If you are in there... might as well fix things that might break. That being said, 7k miles is next to nothing.
 

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Kevlar said:
Brake fluid is hygroscopic, so it absorbs water. The more water it absorbs, the lower it's boiling point the worse it works. I normally flush mine brake fluid at least once a year. If I do a track event, I normally flush it afterwards (or if it's be a while, before and afterwards), it's cheap to do and makes a word of difference when it comes to braking performance. This is in regards to the car, I'd imagine it'd be the same for the motorcycle.
Thanks for the clarification. The piece I read also mentioned how it absorbs water, I just wasn't sure how fast it would deteriorate. I figure I should flush mine - 24K now....
 

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Alf at 7K change the oil and that's it!

Valves are at 16K more or less.
Brake fluid 12K
Anti freeze 36K
Spark Plugs 36K
Air Filter if not K&N or other similar brand every 12K inspect and or replace.
Oil 3K
Fork Oil 36K
 

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Snowman said:
Alf at 7K change the oil and that's it!

Valves are at 16K more or less.
Brake fluid 12K
Anti freeze 36K
Spark Plugs 36K
Air Filter if not K&N or other similar brand every 12K inspect and or replace.
Oil 3K
Fork Oil 36K
just like i said only detailed...

Further more, brake fluid for motorcycles are made for motorcycles for the reason of boiling and water absorption protection...
 

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motopsyko32 said:
just like i said only detailed...

Further more, brake fluid for motorcycles are made for motorcycles for the reason of boiling and water absorption protection...
actualy grasshopper brake fluid is brake fluid not application specific. The DOT rating determins boiling point like DOT3 boils before DOT4, most bikes use DOT4 but unless your going to the track DOT3 works just fine. :)
 

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Yeah... I think both car and motorcycle use the same fluid... DOT3 or DOT4. DOT4 being the better equivalent. DOT5 however is for specific application as it is silica based and not for use in a production (non-race) environment.

I haven't gotten around to changing the fluid on my bike yet, but I religiously use ATE Super Blue & ATE Super Gold on the car. Castrol makes another DOT4 fluid, but it's pricey per quart and once you open the container/brake the seal, you pretty much have to use the entire thing.
 

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ok after further research I was wrong on the brake fluid...:
DOT 3 and DOT 4 are hydroscopic - they allow water to be absorbed into the fluid. This means that when heated up a fluid with water in it will boil more quickly (water boils at a lower temperature than brake fluid) which will lead to cavitation. DOT 5 does not absorb water and will not strip paint work but as the water is not absorbed it simply sinks to the bottom of the system which is usually the caliper where operating temperatures are very high. Water in the caliper is bad as it can cause corrosion within the caliper although silicone fluids contain corrosion inhibitors and as water has a lower boiling point than fluid (100 Degree's C) there is more chance of boiling under relatively light braking. Glycol based fluids can strip paintwork where as silicone based do not. Silicone fluids also have a very long life which is why it is used in military vehicles which may be stored for years without use but be expected to be ready for action at a moments notice.
 

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Yup... that's why DOT3 and DOT4 fluids have a wet and dry boiling points... dry being much higher (prior the massive water absorbtion). The higher the boiling point the better...

I didn't know that about DOT5 brake fluids. I would imagine that since the water doesn't get absorbed but instead sinks into the caliper that would be really bad. Not only from a corrosion stand point, but once that water points and turns to stem, it'll pressurize the brake system in the wrong direction forcing brake fluid out the top of the brake resevoir, but also I'd imagine giving you squishy brake feel as you were compressing what is left of the brake fluid against steam rather than the brake piston.

I learned something new today...
 
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