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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I'm in california and was pondering upon this deal I recently came upon. 2008 SV 650 oregon plates and registration. The guy is still paying the loan off and doesn't have the title in hand. I've looked at DMV sites til I'm blue in the face and was curious as to fees on my end if I buy an out of state motorcycle. Initially I'll only have the bill of sale. I'm planning to meet up with him on tuesday to give cash get the bill of sale and take the cycle, but once I have the cycle with no title and out of state registration, am I totally dependent on this guy to jump through hoops with me in order to get it registered properly in my state and in my name?

So lost and frustrated at this point could really use some general advice. Would really like to make this deal work but if the headache will potentially be too much to do it I will be able to let it go.
 

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You could always go to his bank with him. Don't walk away without all your paperwork.

I have purchased my last three vehicles out of state.... No big thing except sales tax and registration.

But there has always been a title on hand. I wouldn't walk away without the title though.
 

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Some other things to keep in mind as well:

Before Buying a Vehicle From Out of State - Be Sure You Can Register It in California FFVR 29

" Be Sure You Can Register it in California

The Bottom Line

If you are a California resident and acquire a new car, truck or motorcycle from another state, it must be certified to meet California smog laws in order to be registered here. This includes certain diesel powered vehicles. DMV cannot accept an application to register a vehicle in California that does not qualify for registration (Health and Safety Codes [H&SC] §§43150 – 43156.)

What Is Considered a new Vehicle?

California considers any vehicle with less than 7,500 miles on the odometer at the time of purchase or trade by a California resident or business to be a new vehicle. This holds true whether or not the vehicle has been registered in another state.

Aren't all Vehicles California Certified?

Not all new vehicles are manufactured to be sold in California residents or businesses. Many manufacturers make vehicles to be sold in the other 49 states. These vehicles (49-State) are made with smog equipment that meets federal emission standards, but not California standards. California certified (50-State) vehicles are made to be sold to California residents.

Check the Label

To find out whether a car, truck or motorcycle is California certified, check the emission label under the hood. For a motorcycle check the frame or refer to your owner's manual. The label should read that the vehicle conforms to California regulations, or that it is legal for sale in California.
Exemptions

There are a few exemptions included in the law. As a California resident you may be able to register a 49-State vehicle if it was:

Obtained as part of a divorce, inheritance, or a legal separation settlement
Purchased it to replace your California registered vehicle stolen while you were using it out of state.
Purchased it to replace your California registered vehicle that was destroyed or made inoperative beyond reasonable repair while you were using it out of state.
An emergency vehicle, pursuant to California Vehicle Code § 27156.2 and 27156.3.
Registered by you in the state of your last active military service outside California."
 

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if you are in CA just dont do it. If it were a classic no problem but a newer bike is just going to have you throwing money at it. There are hundreds of of bike in CA to pick from.
 
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I am familiar with California as well and have two comments

a) the 7,500 mile bit is real so be sure it does have / can have that many miles. You didn't say.

B) as good a deal as it may be the seller must, as you suspect, do a lot of follow-through that may or may not happen readily. For me that alone is a deal breaker. No title? Too much risk.

From what state is this bike? Is it a deal enough that you will consider going to his bank and pay off the bike, giving him the residual money and getting a title? More probably this bike is financed by an out-of-area finance company that may take 30 or more days to forward the title to the seller. No dice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I am familiar with California as well and have two comments

a) the 7,500 mile bit is real so be sure it does have / can have that many miles. You didn't say.

B) as good a deal as it may be the seller must, as you suspect, do a lot of follow-through that may or may not happen readily. For me that alone is a deal breaker. No title? Too much risk.

From what state is this bike? Is it a deal enough that you will consider going to his bank and pay off the bike, giving him the residual money and getting a title? More probably this bike is financed by an out-of-area finance company that may take 30 or more days to forward the title to the seller. No dice.
The bike has 7850 miles. Initially I asked him to meet at his bank and do the paperwork there, but his bank is in oregon, which is also where his bike is registered.

It's not necessarily a screaming deal, just under KBB's value, but it's rare to find that bike in that condition it seems, but I'm sure given enough time I could get another deal similar to the one I'm attempting now...I'm just itching for it RIGHT NOW! :(.
 

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Let's imagine this.....

You give the seller the money and get a bill of sale.
He takes the money, with all intent to use a portion of it to pay off the bike and ship you the title
He has a family crisis arise, and instead, uses your money to (bail out a brother from jail, buy a kidney for an uncle, buy a big bag of weed, get that MacBook pro he always wanted)
The bike doesnt get paid off and this person now no longer has the funds to do it any time soon.

How do think this story ends? Far fetched scenario? Not really.
 

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You havent actually seen the bike in Person, so condition means SQUAT?

Being it is California, an added Barrier, I say walk and find another deal in California.

As far a KBB, its always High and over priced
 

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No title, no cash!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You havent actually seen the bike in Person, so condition means SQUAT?

Being it is California, an added Barrier, I say walk and find another deal in California.

As far a KBB, its always High and over priced
I have seen it in person and test driven it. Bike is fine brakes needed bleeding it was late he ran out of dot4 stores were closed etc. Otherwise I would have had the bike in my possession right now. Could be a good thing that happened.

Other than not having the title, what would him not paying off the bike do to me? Could I just file for another title using the bill of sale?
 

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You can pay the bike off, and have the title sent directly to you, if you do it through your bank or his and both parties are there for the transaction, they can do it, they'll contact directly the payoff finance company, cut the other guy a check for any difference. Just call them to set it up first, or see their process.

The drawback with allowing him to take a couple weeks to pay off the bike, and the Title holder Finance company another couple weeks afterwards to mail the title to him, your looking over a month to actually see a Title, with various parties doing their thing correctly.

No you cant just file for another title with a Bill of sale, if they do a title search they'll see it already is titled, and owned by a Finance company.
 

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I have seen it in person and test driven it. Bike is fine brakes needed bleeding it was late he ran out of dot4 stores were closed etc. Otherwise I would have had the bike in my possession right now. Could be a good thing that happened.

Other than not having the title, what would him not paying off the bike do to me? Could I just file for another title using the bill of sale?
Wait - this is a 2008 SV-650 that hasn't been paid off yet? He bought an SV-650 on a five-year plan?

If so, this guy has *no* money, maintenance has very likely been deferred, and oh-by-the-way "brakes need bleeding" is frequently shorthand for "something's wrong with the brakes and I have no idea what it is or how to fix it".

All of this with an out-of-state bike with a lien on it? Just walk up to the nearest brick wall and :philb. You'll be much happier when you wake up and have forgotten about this bike.

KeS
 

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So allow me to get a little "technical" since you seem to need the information down to this level

The seller of the bike is not the owner at this time. The bike is owned by the bank/finance company that holds the title.

The bill of sale would exhibit INTENT for the person paying on the bike to transfer it to you but means NOTHING to a DMV agent. The true owner is whomever the title states or the legal leinholder.

If he doesn't pay off the bike it's still property of the bank. It is not yours. Yes you have legal recourse to sue the seller but it will be costly in time and money.

The leinholder must receive full payment to release the bike to the seller so he may in turn transfer it to you. Giving cash to the seller does nothing to accomplish this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
So allow me to get a little "technical" since you seem to need the information down to this level

The seller of the bike is not the owner at this time. The bike is owned by the bank/finance company that holds the title.

The bill of sale would exhibit INTENT for the person paying on the bike to transfer it to you but means NOTHING to a DMV agent. The true owner is whomever the title states or the legal leinholder.

If he doesn't pay off the bike it's still property of the bank. It is not yours. Yes you have legal recourse to sue the seller but it will be costly in time and money.

The leinholder must receive full payment to release the bike to the seller so he may in turn transfer it to you. Giving cash to the seller does nothing to accomplish this.
Alright. Looks like the obvious thing to do is let it slide. Thanks for your help as well as everybody else who gave input.
 

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So allow me to get a little "technical" since you seem to need the information down to this level

The seller of the bike is not the owner at this time. The bike is owned by the bank/finance company that holds the title.

The bill of sale would exhibit INTENT for the person paying on the bike to transfer it to you but means NOTHING to a DMV agent. The true owner is whomever the title states or the legal leinholder.

If he doesn't pay off the bike it's still property of the bank. It is not yours. Yes you have legal recourse to sue the seller but it will be costly in time and money.

The leinholder must receive full payment to release the bike to the seller so he may in turn transfer it to you. Giving cash to the seller does nothing to accomplish this.
THIS.

In even simpler terms, the seller does not have the legal right to even sell you the bike, as he does not own it, the finance company does. You cant sell what you dont own.
 
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