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ok boys strap on your flame throwers.
almost have 2000 miles and still learning. my biggest problem is my approach to a 90 deg. turn. i feel that i am slowing down too much. and other times my turns take me too wide.
i quess my question would be how much speed should i approach at and when do i accelarate during the turn? maybe im a bit timid at leaning more or counter tuning more?
i still need to take my msf. next one is nov.12. until then im looking for good advise. thanks.......
 

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Shut the **** up and ride
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90 degree turns still get me, and even tho im not a 'new rider' i only have about 20k miles under my belt (which isnt much in the scheme of 'experience, yet i consider myself a good rider).

i prefer to always take them slow, yet friends of mine will take them pretty fast. i think "slowing down too much" is not really possible, unless your going like 5mph in which the bike would seem to tip over easily.

my advice would be to practice them, and rely on MSF instructors for "hands on" advice.

for now, practice practice practice and always accelerate out of the turn. im not too good on "precise advice" as some veteran riders on here will explain that for you. yet always make sure to be smooth thru the turn and you should be ok. and always start off slow, then progress!
 

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Start out slow. smoothly add throttle.
Enter a bit faster (a small small bit, don't conclude that you can do a certain speed from the "feel" and jump 10mph) add throttle earlier. Smooth, little by little.

as another newbie rider I've noticed its a lot easier to feel when you're adding throttle too quickly on a bike than on a car.

Keep doing this until you get uncomfortable with the rear end slippage on the exit of the corner. A good execution of a corner, whether you are racing or on the street, is going to feel (to a newbie anyways) like you went in too slow. Once you enter a corner so fast that you can't get on the throttle early enough, you've come in too fast. Ultimately you are shooting for an entry speed and turn in that gives you the best speed into the straightaway as you exit. A way to measure this would be to see your speed on the exit of the corner or check your lap time..

Of course, use your own wisdom on how far you're gonna take this. I only explained it because it illustrates the principals of proper cornering. I don't think you should be trying to go faster and faster on the street.

Oh, btw and you have to lean the bike over (more). Look ahead. I've played around with hanging off but I think the experienced riders recommend against it. I've found that looking ahead naturally gets you to lean more.

As far as body positioning and shifting weights go, I'd wait for a more experienced rider... I only talked about speed because it applies equally to cars and that is where all of my racing / track experience is..

ENTER SLOW
EXIT FAST
(i.e. go slower to go faster)
 

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Old school fool
1994 CB 1000
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First, you have to get past the mental block you are developing. It seems to be you are building these up into a "problem" and that will make you lock up or get jerky. Cornering is a learned thing and it gets easier with practice. Here's the easiest way -

Start your turn on the outside part of the lane, tip in and apex in towards a spot you choose close to the inside curb (make sure not to get too close and watch out for crap that sometimes gathers in places like that). Then arc away from that point towards the outside of the lane you are turning in to and right the bike.

All your braking should be done before tipping in to the turn. Once you tip in and are set on your line, start to accelerate trough the turn. How much you accelerate depends upon your lean angle, your line of sight and your run off. Start with just a little - enough to settle the bike on its suspension and drive you through the turn. As you move through the corner and start to stand the bike up in its new direction, continue to roll on the throttle until you are riding normally.

One thing many new riders do is pull in the clutch and coast through sharp turns. Don't do this the clutch should be engaged the whole time. Also, don't pull in the clutch, coast through half the turn let it out and start to accelerate. That jerks you around too much and may make the bike react funny. Declerate, downshift, tip in and start to accelerate right away.

The trick here is to turn that scary 90 degree "L" into a nice smooth arc that can be handled easily and smoothly. Later, once you get comfortable you'll find that if you know what you are doing you'll find you can scream into a turn, thow a bike down into an impossible angle, change directions in a wink and use the throttle to right yourself. But that will come later, for now, think arcs not angles and you'll do better.
 

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Also, turn your head. Look where you want to go, not where you're going. That, and keep a loos grip on the bars.
 

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make sure your in a real crowded area first then speed into the turn, trail brake into mid turn, hang off bike and prepare for full lean angle.

wear protective gear for knee dragging.

now your set!



ok, just kidding, but like said above. take your time, practice, go at your own comfort. you will get better at it.
 

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Ok where are these 90 degree turns? On the street? As in look here is a stop sign now I must turn left?
Or at your local Wally World / Star Pucks?
Or on some sick race track?

Ok if you are on the street and there isn't stop sign
1) Scoot but forward so that balls and tank are close friends. This will cause your arms to bend. If not
2) Unlock your silly ass arms! The soccer moms are so not turned on by your triceps.
3) Down shift if need be or slowly start applying a bit of front brake. Key word here is slow!
4) If you haven't stoppied the bike and haven't face planted turn your head. That's the thing inside your helmet! Yeah turn it so you are looking at the direction you wish to go.
5) Move shoulders from the center line to the inside of the turn.
6) Counter steer
7) As you approach the apex drop the hammer! As in open up a can of woop ass! Floor the sucker!
8) Stick out left foot like you are flat tracking! The rear wheel should be spinning and smoking by now!
9) Pull the handle bars with your right hand, release your left hand and start flashing gang signs at all the hot soccer moms! They love it! Extra credit if you slap your own ass!
10) Past the apex and haven't died! Well time to really have fun! Lean back and do a one handed wheelie out of there and right into the back of a school bus!
11) Ignore 6-10 and you'll do fine! It's all about being loose on the bike. You would be surprised how far your bike can lean at low speeds!
 

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.....
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i'm thinking he's talking about turns at intersections. if so, don't worry about going fast. sure you can, but thats usually where gravel will build up. as long as you keep it in your own lane and don't go so slow that the guy behind you runs you over then you're fine.

remember, look where you want to go and stay loose
 

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The best possible way to get better at turning your bike is to get some race instruction...believe it or not, what you learn on the track will help you with even the most mundane of commuting tasks like navigating a 90 degree intersection corner. (See sig)

However, if that is not an option for you, I recommend you get some more parking lot time....setup a corner scenario you like (use cones if possible) and just practice it over and over and over. Experiment with higher and lower corner entry SPEEDS, different turn entry points, and different timing in terms of rolling on the gas.

Best of luck!!!!!!
 

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You know what I was tought.
Ok say you are making a left hander.
First look left then right then left again.
This assures you have surveyed the intersection and it starts the bike to lean into the left hander for when you turn your head you are actually turning so your path looks like an S
 

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...However, if that is not an option for you, I recommend you get some more parking lot time....setup a corner scenario you like (use cones if possible) and just practice it over and over and over. Experiment with higher and lower corner entry speeds, different turn entry points, and different timing in terms of rolling on the gas...
+100
 

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Just Kiss The Tip
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Something that works for me....

I try to look at a corner as 3 points: Entry, Apex, Exit (which are essentially what a corner is composed of). But I just try to run a straight line (more like a diagonal line) directly through the turn on a 90 turn. I know this may be hard to grasp in words without pictures, but I just straighten out a corner by running a diagonal line through it.

Outside-Inside-Outside.
 

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Relax and go as slow as you feel is necessary. Don't worry so much about accelerating out of the corner, just try to maintain your speed; that's more for twisty roads when you get more experience. Practice and you'll get it. :cheers
 

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Just Kiss The Tip
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I just started reading Twist of the Wrist II last night....

SR#1----Chopping the throttle. DON't DO IT...remain constant and smooth as to not upset the suspension of the bike...aim(picture in your head/feel it on the bike) for 60/40 rear/front traction by setting the suspension with the throttle....

...Damn that is some goooooooddddd stuff...can't wait until I can actually start applying it on my next ride.
 

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I just started reading Twist of the Wrist II last night....

SR#1----Chopping the throttle. DON't DO IT...remain constant and smooth as to not upset the suspension of the bike...aim(picture in your head/feel it on the bike) for 60/40 rear/front traction by setting the suspension with the throttle....

...Damn that is some goooooooddddd stuff...can't wait until I can actually start applying it on my next ride.
If you like the book, imagine the 1 on 1 instruction at the school.

((Yes, I am a shameless promoter of the CSS, but I do it with no compensation, I just love the school)).
 

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Are we not men?
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Another good book is: Total Control by Lee Parks.
 
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