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I work for a body shop and have access to sandblasting , powder coating, paint booths, and all the crap needed to mod my bike a 2007 ninja 500. however im a web designer and have 0 mechanic skills, 0 painter skills. I however can learn fast and use you tube vids. However im seeing alot of conflicting things. talking about etching primers and sandpaper.

I was just going to sand blast the rim, put tire on but NOT set the bead, cover tire with tape and paint.
As I just ordered 2 tires and 2 break pads for the front and rear tire and I thought what better time to paint.
What would be the sequence / correct method involving painting a rim?
 

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step one. stand up
step two. look around
step three. see the guy with the weird colored coveralls?
good, ask him to help you.
 

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ok, some actual advice.

if you have no exsperiance painting at all, don't start on something you want to look good.

if you have access to a gun, go buy some really cheep paint. if you do not have access to a gun go buy some cheep rattle cans.

practice with those until you can get paint on something without drips, runs, missed spots, ect. (practice on stuff you do not care about looking good).

now choose what paint you want to use, this will determine what process you take for preparing the wheel.

No matter what paint you use, how good the final product looks will largely depend upon how clean you can get the metal.

rims do not have large gently curved surfaces like a car body panel, so a rim is much more forgiving than they are about subtle mistakes and is a good choice for a first project. Something else that can help cover up small mistakes is to use a high gloss black. it doesn't show tiny flaws as easily as other colors.
 

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+1 to what jeffo said.

here's what i did.
took tire off (in your case, keep tire off) , sand the rim, wipe it down with some rubbing alcohol, prime it a few times, then start adding the paint. i used tremclad silver for a buddies rim and it came out nice.

one thing i did that hepled with the painting, is to be able to make a stand that allows your to suspend the wheel at the axle. doing this lets you rotate the rim while spraying, thus giving your the control of too much over spray and even coats.

good luck.
 

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I find that if you want to completely strip something, instead of sanding you can save yourself some time and use chemicals to remove the paint (i.e. aircraft remover). If this is your first attempt at painting, read up as much as you can, don't expect it to be show quality.
 

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not the best quality but he covers how to strip the wheel.

paint stripper VS powdercoat - YouTube

a tip about paint stripper is that you put it on. Kinda thick. and you don't touch it to much. Don't try to paint it and move it around. Once on let it do its work.


then this video goes over painting rims

paintng alloy mag wheels - YouTube

i'm a huge fan of his work. seems legit.

but I hear powder coat will not damage as easy. but its more money if you are tying to keep it down by DIY.
 

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you don't have to strip the old paint off. unless it is peeling etc.

the old paint is an acceptable substrate for new paint and primers. sand it nice and smooth. for a rim I would use a gray scuff pad instead of sandpaper. they're better at getting into all the imperfections and tight areas of a rim.
if it has any chips you will have to sand those out by feathering the paint edges at least an inch and a half from the center of the chip. then primer the whole thing to get an even color coat.
any bare metal has to be primered.
wetsand the primer with 400-500 and it's ready for the paint.

etch primers are for bare metal. they etch themselves into the metal. you can use standard 2K primer on bare metal but etch primer is often used under the other primer. etch primer is very thin and will not give you build up like a standard primer does.
standard primer is basically for 2 things.
1. to build up and hide imperfections
2. gives the paint something to adhere to.
 
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