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I was talking to my friend who has been ridin for baout 10 or so years and he said that overinflating the tires allows u to turn better. I wasnt exactly sure what to believe so im askin you guys what do u think
 

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There's a lot of folklore and voodoo behind some tire pressure opinions. I'm with quick in thinking that the bike manufacturers should know what is best in most cases. By all means experiment a little if you want. Certainly inflation should be less at the track due to the excessive heat build-up. I can see some logic in quicker turn-ins with a little higher inflation as that would tend to accentuate the tire's profile a little, but does it really matter?
 

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Use the manufacturers suggestions as a guide and adjust it to how you like it.

Avon recommends 36 front and 38 rear for my tires. That's what I run and it feels good to me.
 

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I can offer this bit of information:

My roommate, who owns an ST1100, got some advice from a local bike shop to overinflate his tires somewhat--to improve the longevity of his tires. Of course, this is most CERTAINLY not a twisties bike. It's made as a long-ride sport-tourer, though it's very light on the 'sport'. Anyway, I'd say you should ask your local mechanic and/or other people who are very mechanically inclined, who've owned the same model bike as yours. That'd likely be your best source of information.
 

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overinflated = turn better?

I dont think so, too much air and I am pretty sure you will lose grip because your tire will be so hard. At CLASS motorcycle school they said we could run less than the recommended psi on the track, and the street for optimal grip. He said that the 32-36 psi that is usually recommended is overkill unless you have passengers, luggage etc.
 

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Follow that bit of stupid advise & you will end up wearing the center out of your tyre tread fast then you can believe.

Solitude is also correct loss of traction. I run mine, on the hwy at a bit below what the mfg suggests. After all you must take into consideration that when the tyre becomes hot it will also enflate even more.

After all why is it that you are to check on the tyre pressure should be done when the tyres are cool??? Put in 36psi & honking along for a while you might find you are up to 40psi!!!!!!!
 

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To much air pressure and the tire looses its ability to flex thereby loosing its ability to stick and do its job.

You will get more mileage.
 

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go with the recommened tire psi and you should be alright.
 

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the bike will feel more responsive but in a high speed turn you'll lose grip and your bike will probably come out from under you...in fact when im at the track i usually run with my tires lower then factory spec...
 

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Maybe I'm wrong but my understanding is that the pressure on the tire or on the frame is the MAXIMUM recommended pressure. I've always been told the maximum might be used while riding two-up or with a heavy load. The recommended pressure for my tires is 42 front and rear, but I ride alone so I inflate both to about 38 psi. Riding at the maximum pressure may increase your tire life but the crowns will flatten over time and you'll lose grip for cornering.

If I'm wrong please correct me.
 

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alaska cajun said:
To much air pressure and the tire looses its ability to flex thereby loosing its ability to stick and do its job.

You will get more mileage.
Yes, and it also focuses the contact patch on a smaller strip of rubber, also increasing the wear. Overinflating will wear your tires down just as quickly as underinflating them.

Underinflating can also fuck up your handling just as bad or worse than overinflating. It just depends on which extreme you care to take it to.
 

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Overinflation is bad. I overinflated once and almost went down b/c the tire just slid....

Do NOT overinflate your tires most than a couple pounds of pressure or you will lose grip.
 

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There should be a psi number on the tire itself....it's going to read something like this: max load at so and so kpa (--- psi)

That psi number is the max load of the tire, meaning...at that level of pressure, the tire is holding all the weight that it possibly can, and that even higher will not allow it to safely support a heavier load. I would never run a bike tire at maximum load. Too stiff and it will probably crown out bad and you'll be unstable like everyone else said.

Don't set your tire psi until you find your max load number....they might be different between tires, I'm really not sure. But the max load should help you better determine what an appropriate pressure is for your particular tire. I don't go by frame numbers--I think those are more intended for OEM tires in an OEM application. Non OEM tires will kind of void out the frame specs, IMO.

I work with car tires, never done bike tires, but I imagine it's the same. Car tires generally have max load numbers of 35, 44, 65, and 80 psi, as a general rule.
 
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