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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking to buy two sets of Pilot Road 3s and I am wondering when the online tire retailers usually start their sales(or if they do?)



$300 a set hurts, but is the best deal I've found (on sportbiketrackgear.com)

The sizes I need are 120/70 and 160/60 as well as 120/70 and 190/55 just in case someone knows of a specific deal.

So like I said..when is the best time of year to buy tires?
 

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The best I remember was a friend got a pair for like 250ish in a store 300 is pretty much average for a decent tire. I don't know if there is a special time but shops/stores will run your standard holiday sales but it isn't like tire have a season since people order them online around the country for touring and track needs alike.
 

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I'd buy local if I were you. A lot of tire dealers will give you a better deal if you buy from them rather than buying elsewhere. Unless you are going to mount them yourself...
 

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Here in Canada we get raped on tire prices. For example, one of the cheapest online retailers in Canada has the Bridgestone S20s on for $356/set before taxes. From the dealer, they're even more. From sportbiketrackgear.com I can get the same exact ones in the same size for $250. It's a no brainer to purchase them in the U.S., get them shipped to a place just across the border, and bring them over myself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'd buy local if I were you. A lot of tire dealers will give you a better deal if you buy from them rather than buying elsewhere. Unless you are going to mount them yourself...
$80 bucks to mount a pair is the going rate around here. Plus, Im doing two bikes so the is $160 already, plus the markup I'll likely pay oin the tires..Conti motions are about $350 mounted at the CHEAP place around here.They sellf or less than $200/set usually online....At this point, I would have already saved enough to buy the balancer and whatnot.


In an isolated tire buying event though, I would agree with you as generally this is good advice.
 

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the joke is in your hand
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just learn how to do it yourself or stop complaining about the price. they have to pay a mechanic what they're worth.
these guys go to schools to be hired at $11/hr and shit. it's insulting to begin with and then you get whinny customers about labor prices.

and you need to learn to shop around. $300 for some sport touring tires is a complete rip off. I don't pay that for hypersport track day tires.
but michelin tires are over priced for no good reason to begin with.
 

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For those tires (Pilot road III) that is about the average price they have been able to be found for the past year. So if you want those, then buy them.

As far as the $80 mount and balance price, For on the bike service where you ride up and they do it all. Yep that is a decent deal. If you are carrying in loose rims then 1/2 that should be the norm (IMO)~` if you don't think those prices are fair then by all means buy the equipment and learn to do them yourself.
Around here techs start around $15 hr (plus the expenses of insurances, SS tax, training etc...), then you have a service writer, service manager and of course the overhead of the building and all that entails with tooling etc... I highly doubt that at $80 to install on the bike that it is some huge profit machine. Profitable yes, after all they still need to pay the owners, middle management, payroll department etc... I could see a true hourly expense at a busy service department being easily $50/ hr and it may take that employee an hour to complete the work (from the time he heads out to bring it in, until he is back from the test ride and tools away, hands washed and ready for the next bike), So sure they perhaps netted $30 on the deal, big whoop
 

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Three of us bought a Coats 220 changer about ten years ago. It is awesome and has saved us a fortune - not just mount/balance costs but being able to buy tires on line. NoMar sells changers even cheaper and several guys I know have bought them and are happy.

Once your start changing your own you won't believe you ever paid anyone to do it.

BTW, make sure you know the shipping costs before you buy on line. I got hosed once on "handling fees".
 

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Three of us bought a Coats 220 changer about ten years ago. It is awesome and has saved us a fortune - not just mount/balance costs but being able to buy tires on line. NoMar sells changers even cheaper and several guys I know have bought them and are happy.

Once your start changing your own you won't believe you ever paid anyone to do it.

BTW, make sure you know the shipping costs before you buy on line. I got hosed once on "handling fees".
Most of the good online retailers like Revzilla, MotorcycleSuperstore, and Sportbiketrackgear, have free shipping options.
 

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Most of the good online retailers like Revzilla, MotorcycleSuperstore, and Sportbiketrackgear, have free shipping options.
Yes - it was a place I had bought a fair amount of gear from over the years. All of a sudden they hosed me on this one tire sale. No linger do business with them.

I have used all three so the places you mentioned with good results. SW Moto Tire was good but their redesigned web site is pretty bad.
 

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Most of the good online retailers like Revzilla, MotorcycleSuperstore, and Sportbiketrackgear, have free shipping options.
I remember a couple years ago motorcyclesuperstore were advertising a big tire sale with heavy discounts. They had advertised this sale a couple weeks in advance. Well, a couple hours before the sale started they began jacking up the prices on most of their tires so they ended up at about the same price. We were able to get a couple tires before they screwed with the prices but several others had already been jacked up.

We still buy tires from them, but that was a pretty sleasy move on their part.
 

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you can get bridgstones equivalents of pilot road III for about $220. if you think they're no good you should see how fast my brother rides on them. he will ride just as fast as the rest of our group on hypersport and race take off tires. actually out pace most of our group too.
it's more the rider than the tires these days. as in all these newer tires can out perform most riders abilities.

usually I buy my bridgestones from american motorcycle tire but their site is getting a face lift or something. it's going to be down for a week or so it says.
I usually pay about $220-240 shipped for bt-003rs or bt-016 pro's. so you're getting the shaft at $300 for touring tires.

American Motorcycle Tire
 

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PR 3's are just plain expensive. I'm pretty sure they're actually one of the most expensive that Michelin makes. Even the Power Pures were cheaper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
you can get bridgstones equivalents of pilot road III for about $220. if you think they're no good you should see how fast my brother rides on them. he will ride just as fast as the rest of our group on hypersport and race take off tires. actually out pace most of our group too.
it's more the rider than the tires these days. as in all these newer tires can out perform most riders abilities.

usually I buy my bridgestones from american motorcycle tire but their site is getting a face lift or something. it's going to be down for a week or so it says.
I usually pay about $220-240 shipped for bt-003rs or bt-016 pro's. so you're getting the shaft at $300 for touring tires.

American Motorcycle Tire

I've thought about it but its well documented that people are getting 7-10k miles out of the PR3s
S20s are about $230 a set and super tempting. They MIGHT last what 3-4k?

Simple math says $300 is cheaper than $460.
I do alot of straight line riding in between my corner strafing..This thread here pretty much set me onto PR3s:


Looking at tires for my big heavy TLR - TLPlanet Forums
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Last whore post...lol

I'll admit though..I see the S20s and think...man..I could ride just like Mladin if I had those tires..........

Then Is tart seeing visions of commuting(which I do alot on my bike..in the cold...and wet soemtimes).......

Then I start seeing TN HWY 232 near land between the lakes(baby dragon to the locals) ...and think..man will the PR3s be enough....Or will I even be enough for the PR3s?....

Truth is, I got scared of traffic/animals/cops/tractors/etc before I ran out of Shinko 009s on the Wife's Ninja 650 there...Started getting some cool looking wear ont he edges of the tire though!
 

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PRIII or BT023

BT023 for the win. Here is why;

First off-what someone else claims they get may well vary greatly from what you may get or even from what they actually get, so ...

I have no less than 5 riding friends who have ridden on both tires,
the bikes;
2009 Concours1400
2012 ZX10R
2011 CBR1000RR
2007 SV650
2004 VFR800

The riding;

We ride "The Pace", most of the riding is simply done between 60-75mph on the tightest twistiest roads that I can make a route sheet up for. These are secondary 1 1/2 lane roads primarily that are pretty beat up and very much under cared for (Cty Rd T, cty Rd D, Cty Rd DD, Blank Hill Road, Cty Rd G, Cty Rd J, Cty Rd JJ) these are all around the Arcadia Wisconsin area. Now there are several roads we frequent (connector roads if you will)that are actually county Highways, well maintained and relatively smooth but far more patrolled with b***** more open "sweepers" for the most part. (Hwy 88, Hwy 37, Hwy 95, Cty Rd A...all around the Arcadia Wisconsin area)
The VFR rider is probably the slowest rider, so he has to ride a bit faster on the straights to stay with the group and he also uses his bike to commute to and from work frequently. 5200 miles out of his only set of PRIII's (and the front was actually far more worn than the rear...smooth fornt around 50% of the tire and only at the end of the wear bars on 40% of the rear) The same rider riding the same sort of miles and roads on BT023's has never gotten less than 5000 out of a rear and 7000 miles out of a front...and he generally changes them as soon after as he can once they hit the wear bars

The Conny rider;
He does well to stay caught up with the group but is perhaps the most timid at corner entry, so he is likely throttling on the hardest through the turns and on the heaviest bike. He also rides his bike to and from work as much as possible. 4700 miles out of PRIII's (his only set and his front was also getting smooth for about 50% of the tire and the back had a 2" wide no wear bars left area but you could faintly make out the tread. This same rider has ridden on about 7 sets of BT023's (both GT version and regular versions) his worst mileage on the standard model is 4000 miles, when he went to Upper Michigan and ran around the 100 mph for 3 days of riding...but riding in my "pace" rides he has been getting between 4500 and 4900 on the standard models and 4700-5000 rears and 7000-8000 fronts on the GT model of BT023's (190/55-17 and 120/70-17)
The ZX10R rider, well he is throttle happy and he rides lots and lots of miles with all sorts of groups, some pace, some triple the posted. So of course his mileage will vary greatly, that said he is an about 2700-3200 mile guy on either tire riding his crazy ass speeds. For comparison he often rides on PP2CT's and can barely manage 2000 out of a rear.
The 1000RR guy;
Well he rides "pace" rides, but he likes roads that are far more open and much more relaxed "sweeper" like turns where he can wick it up to triple digits more often....So again his mileages vary some based on which rides he does the most on that set of tires but he has been getting in the 4500 per rear mileage out of BT023's and closer to 6000-6500 out of those fronts. His one and only set of of PRIII's he wore them both out in 4300 miles.

The SV650 got nearly 9000 miles out his BT023's (they were both squared flat but plenty of tread depth still) and he changed out of those PRIII's at 9800 miles and the front was past the wear bars and flat and the rear was very squared off and into the wer bars...He did trips with his father (Harley cruiser) from MN to Arizona and California, Wyoming, Montana, Utah etc...they mostly stayed on Hiways, so it seems almost exclusively straightline ridng at Hiways speeds

Now how does this apply to you? Well seeing how nearly anyone&everyone controls there own life of a tire (how you ride...throttle jockey? smooth?, triple digits? around town with gentle acceleration etc...)then where you ride (how abrasive are the roads, how hot is it etc...), how cognisant of your tire pressures you are (and is it the "right" pressure), two up or solo, are your wheels aligned properly, how well does your suspension work and on and on and on.
My point being these are strictly some direct comparison numbers on the same bike with the same rider on the same roads. The extra $70+ for the PRIII's over the BT023's doesn't seem to be a worthwhile investment in any of these cases (1 note....the ZX10R guy rode confidently at speeds over 100 mph on some tree covered roads in pouring rain that kept car drivers home and felt the tire did more than enough...maybe he is stupid, maybe he is brave, maybe it was okay?....I was not there thankfully~`this is confidence he felt he would not have had on any other tire)
All of these riders got very similar mileages...they were close enough to easily outweigh in the favor of the BT023's in terms of cost per mile.

Your note about the S20 and mileage;
I have ridden 2 sets of these, both rears made it less than 4000 miles (my average on Q2's or M3's or M5's is about 4700 per) however both S20 fronts went easily to 6000 miles whereas generally I am changing all other tires as sets since the fronts are done within about 500-700 miles of the rears. I ride a 600 at "pace" riding and am very easy with brakes and throttle (original brake pads still at 70,000 miles). I have taken all these tires on the track and the S20's did feel the best and give the most confidence, barely edging out the Q2 on a dry track, it was the M3&Q2 as tops when in the wet--I still prefer the BT003RS if dry and given longer riding sessions, especially on "real" racetracks---

You have little to lose by trying both, or everything available (The Q2 front and Roadsmart rear combo is real popular here for riding conditions similar to what you describe). Run through a set of one and then the other or all the tire choices you can (if you ride enough). That would be the best way for you to make an educated decision on what works best for you and your riding style and location.

Just so we are all on the same page; I describe roads around here that I ride on as...

** sweeper- a road that has long open large radius turns that are not too close together. ie a corner that nearly anyone on any bike could easily take at triple digits staying in a wheel track and other than the law, pose little danger to themselves in terms of crashing (no I do not support riding triple digits) These roads are well traveled and well maintained and rarely is there sand/gravel etc to suprise you and have large shoulder areas.

** tight technically challenging secondary road- a road that typically has no centerline, is narrower than your standard road (1 1/2 lanes wide is common) and has no or little shoulders. Turns are often unmarked and close together with the vast majority of turns that are marked or should be marked are, 25mph-35mph turns. Often with decreasing radius, blind corners, blind road/driveway entrances, sand/gravel wash off the hillsides is common along with tree branches (yes the trees are close) and Deer and farm equipment and and and. These roads ridden at any kind of pace (ie 60mph or greater) require above average skills.

** Pace Riding--Maintaining a higher cornering speed (typically the same as the straight) with little use of the throttle and/or the brakes. Smooth would be a good term in how this riding is as we do use brakes and throttle, just very smoothly and often very lightly. Steering inputs are late and decisive. Riding a wheel track or at most only using 40% of your own lane is very common.
 
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