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I'm curious about something, I've come across a word in a few motorcycle magazines that I've never heard before. An article will refer to a bike as being more "flickable" than another bike. What does that mean? They use it alot but always assume none of their readers are new to sportbikes because they don't explain what it means.

thanks,
new FZ6 nut
 

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Flickable basically just means that the bike turns in quicker/ lighter steering/ usually having to do with the rake/trail of a bike. Shorter rake/trails tend to make a motorcycle easier to turn, but less stable in a straight line... Longer the opposite.

They can also use it to describe a light weight bike, altho I would still think it would more than likely have a shorter rake/trail too. Off Road/Dual Sport bikes where you are very upright have a short rake/trail and are very "flickable" Sport Bikes also are more "flickable" generally speaking that a Cruiser.

Hope that helped, and that I explained it right. :)
 

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Yeah I agree.
 

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I always thought it was referring to how long it takes to transition thru an S turn with the flick in the middle. Kind of like turns 3 & 4 at Willow Springs where the bikes front tires come off the ground for a split second as the rider comes up and over the top of the bike before throwing his other knee down. When ever I hear flickable I think transition time.
 

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Mines a bit late in reply but it may help.

-----

Flickable is the "means in which you can throw something about, in other words the ability in which you can change a axis.

You can flick a motorcycle but not a car.
You can flick a match with your wrist (most times people would be holding the match vertical and then quickly changing the matches axis causing spark)
You can flick a light switch by changing the axis of the switch (not on or off but up or down or left and right).

1. You can "countersteer" a motorcycle by "servere flicking" in the opposite direction from what you wish to go (changing the vertical axis violently*)
2. You can flick a motorcycle by flicking the mass of the cycle with brute force body mass (changing the vertical axis of your body or body & the motorcycle)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*WARNING: do not try to countersteer unless you understand the principal of countersteering. countersteering in an emergency situation CAN save your life. if you don't know how --- learn.



Cheers
 

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Actually, it's what motorists refer to in regard to squids that ride such bikes.

Passenger: "Man, did you see that squid rocket by me over the double yellow?"
Driver: "Yeah, flicked my finger at him. Those guys are so flickable."

:D
 

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Kneedragger said:
Actually, it's what motorists refer to in regard to squids that ride such bikes.

Passenger: "Man, did you see that squid rocket by me over the double yellow?"
Driver: "Yeah, flicked my finger at him. Those guys are so flickable."

:D
Alright, now your gonna have to explain 'squid'. I've heard it before and have something in mind that I think it refers to, but never have been sure.
 

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Thats great! That pretty much explains it i'd say.
 

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flipperMAN said:
1. You can "countersteer" a motorcycle by "servere flicking" in the opposite direction from what you wish to go (changing the vertical axis violently*)
2. You can flick a motorcycle by flicking the mass of the cycle with brute force body mass (changing the vertical axis of your body or body & the motorcycle)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*WARNING: do not try to countersteer unless you understand the principal of countersteering. countersteering in an emergency situation CAN save your life. if you don't know how --- learn.



Cheers
If you're riding a motorcycle, you are ALWAYS countersteering (except at slower speeds). Also, you can lean your body to hell and back off the side of a bike, but if you're not moving the bars, you're not flicking the bike anywhere (iow, you're most likely still moving in a straight line).
 

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madscientist said:
Alright here is my question, Is Squid an acronmy for something? You know like FUBAR>

It's a combination of two words Squirrelly Kid
It's like when you combine a bear and a deer. . . . you get beer. :D
 

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dbuchanan said:
If you're riding a motorcycle, you are ALWAYS countersteering (except at slower speeds). Also, you can lean your body to hell and back off the side of a bike, but if you're not moving the bars, you're not flicking the bike anywhere (iow, you're most likely still moving in a straight line).
You are correct, countersteering in general riding is created by centrifugal force being acted upon.

I was refering to countersteering as a "physical action by the end user" to highlight the art of flicking the motorcycle.
The warning was in relation only to the art of "servere countersteering (flicking example)" and not "pushing or pulling" which is undertaken in general riding.

Looking at what i wrote i could have made myself a bit clearer.




Cheers
 

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While on the subject of "emergency countersteering" a large number of riders i've meet in the past have been unaware of the art.

If your one of these, i hope this article helps :)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Riding Skills Series: Countermeasures



1. Whether you realize it or not, countersteering is as necessary and vital to your riding as using the brakes. If you're not familiar with countersteering, it's a term used to describe the physical action of steering the bar or clip-ons momentarily in the opposite (yes, opposite) direction of the turn in order to initiate a corner.


The actual physics of countersteering are complicated, and while many people think it requires only a simple explanation, panels of physicists have debated exactly why angular momentum, torques and vectors affect your motorcycle. As riders, we don't need to know the physics, but it is important to have an understanding of how our motorcycle works. We're not going to tell you why, but here is a quick how.

2. Most new riders who have not taken a Motorcycle Safety Foundation course are under the impression that in order to arc through a corner on a motorcycle, the rider must lean and turn the front wheel in the direction of the corner.

In fact, the opposite is true. At speeds greater than 15-20 mph, the rider must initiate a turn by first turning the front wheel toward the outside of the corner (i.e., push on the left bar to go left, push on the right bar to go right). This is a momentary action that rolls the motorcycle off its axis, leaning it in the direction of the bar/clip-on that is pushed. As the bike reaches the desired lean angle, the tire falls into the arc of the turn.



The arrows in the photo above illustrate, from the rider's point of view, the motion needed to initiate a corner. Push forward on the left bar to go left; the opposite to go right.


3. Here's an exercise to practice countersteering. Find an empty stretch of straight road. While riding at steady throttle at a slow speed (35-45 mph), pick a spot on the road ahead and use it as an imaginary obstacle-a point where you'll want to swerve.


As you approach your target, choose the direction you want to maneuver the bike. For the first pass, begin your turn well back from the point you want to avoid and make sure you don't target fixate. Apply slight pressure on the desired clip-on to arc the bike around the "obstacle," then apply pressure on the opposite side to swing back onto your original line. The motion involved in pushing/pulling the clip-ons should be a controlled movement; jerky actions will upset the chassis. As you become more comfortable, advance your initial turn closer to the target. This will require a more forceful action at the clip-ons, but remember to keep your motions smooth. With practice, you can quickly and accurately place the bike using exact countersteering inputs.


4. Remember: At low speeds (less than 15 mph) countersteering doesn't have any effect on turning the motorcycle, but as speeds rise the force of the input required increases. It takes less effort to steer a motorcycle traveling at 60 mph than it does to steer at 100 mph.


Countersteering can be used in two ways: subconsciously or consciously. Those who use it subconsciously perform the action without knowing it, and therefore have less of an understanding of how their motorcycle works. Those who consciously use countersteering-both racers and street riders alike-are able to place their motorcycles precisely where they want.

Whether you are enjoying your favorite road or find yourself in the middle of an emergency situation, the ability to knowingly countersteer your bike and place it where desired gives you greater control in any situation that arises.

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This article was originally published in the December '99 issue of Sport Rider.
Produced on this website with thanks.
 

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flipperMAN said:
You are correct, countersteering in general riding is created by centrifugal force being acted upon.

I was refering to countersteering as a "physical action by the end user" to highlight the art of flicking the motorcycle.
The warning was in relation only to the art of "servere countersteering (flicking example)" and not "pushing or pulling" which is undertaken in general riding.

Looking at what i wrote i could have made myself a bit clearer.
Cheers
I just wanted to head off any bad thinking before it happened. I've seen some bike schools that allow the handlebar to be locked straight and then urge the ridge to attemp to steer the bike with their body. It's pretty hilarious.

As for flickability...to me this is the action of countersteering and being able to quickly adjust body position for optimal lean angle (not using your body to steer the bike). Although I would tend to say the FZ6 has great turn-in, I wouldn't say it's a "flickable" bike (and this probably has alot to do with the ride height/angle and weight). Anyone that is still fuzzy on the flickability concept should view a GP race and watch the riders work the bike!!
 
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