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Discussion Starter #1
This bike has been sitting around for over 5 years and has a little over 6500 miles on it. I'm looking for a good home for it. I have physical reasons why I can't ride anymore. Unfortunately for me my son wants it and he's only 16 years old. I think it's way to much road bike for him. How has anyone in my situation delt with this trying to convince a head strong person he's not ready. (Not sure if this matters but he lives with the ex.).

Words of advice?
 

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I had to look up what it was. Honda RC51 RVT1000R. Yes, that's way too much bike for a 16 year old. Even if he's been riding dirt for years and rides street now, a liter bike is close to a death sentence for a 16 year old. It's yours, not his. You're the Dad. The word you're looking for is "NO". Headstrong is another way of saying he's not going to do what he's told. That doesn't go well with a fast bike. Tickets and attempting to elude quickly follow.

So put it up for sale w/o telling the kid or Ex. When it sells, you could offer to spend some or all of what you made on a bike for your son, if you think that's appropriate, and stipulate some parameters. Not knowing your son's experience level, I don't know what would be appropriate for him. He likely thinks the bike is cool, fast and that he'll look cool on it. Does he have gear? Real ATGATT gear? If not, I wouldn't even consider any bike for him w/o an agreement that he wear armored gear and helmet when ever he rode the bike. And an agreement with the Ex that she has to be ok with the deal too, and if he breaks the deal, he loses the bike. Not just temporary, but it gets sold the very first time he's caught not wearing full gear when riding it. Don't put the bike in his name either. Or if you do, you or the Ex is the Lien holder until he moves out on his own and pays his own bills. (And don't tell him that so he doesn't think he gets a bike if he moves out.)

Alternatively, if any moto shops are open in your area, see what they will give you on trade and what they have in that price range that might be a acceptable choice for your son. Does he ride dirt? Does that interest him? Is that an activity that he could do where he lives w/o need of transport? If these apply, maybe a dirt bike is a better fit.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, for the reply. These are also my beliefs when it comes to riding as far as safety gear and abilities. I'm still talking with my son and he's starting to see things my way. He has only been riding dirt but wants to get on the road as well, he knows that there's a big difference between the two.
 

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I would suggest you allocate some of the funds for rider training. Waynesville MSF Classes The basic rider course is done on their bikes. It's not about learning to ride, though they cover that, but rather learning the awareness of riding on the street. It will also help with his insurance costs. He may ace the actual riding part, which will make him feel good, but it's the classroom and street safety parts that will help him survive. Getting some good habits ingrained to start with is also a win.

I would consider having him pass both the BRC on their bike and the BRC2 class on what ever bike he ends up with before cutting him loose on the street w/o supervision. But that also means finding someone to ride with him that you are comfortable with. Someone that can mentor him a bit and perhaps he will listen to.
 
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