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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since picking up my FZ6 I'm finding my hands, particularly the right, go numb from the vibration.

Is this something my hands will "toughen up" for, or does the vibration subside after breakin, or is it a malfunction?

Don't want to wind up with carpel tunnel!
 

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:gay :joke
 

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Mine did to when I first got it, but they don't lately, and I've done hours in the saddle. Maybe I just toughened up (doubt it), it might be that your gripping a little to hard and all the vibration is translationg directly to your hands and wrists.
 

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Numb Hands

My bars vibrate a bit somewhere between 5000 and 6000 rpm. On the road, I just shift up/down, and do not cruise in that rpm range.
 

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I'm not sure its from the vibration, but more probably from holding the grip in one position for a prolonged period of time. When I first started to ride, the same thing happened to me. However, over time it will become less severe.

Consider getting a throttle lock or vista cruise so that you can occasionally lift your hand off the throttle and flex your wrist a few times. It helps tremendously on long trips.
 

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Consider some form of cruise control or throttle lock. It allows you to change your hand position and get some relief. There are lots of different things out there from the Throttle Meister to the Cramp Buster. Do some hunting and figure what'll work for you.
 

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Make sure you're not squeezing too tightly, and don't rest all your weight on your hands.
 

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fhbrian said:
Don't grip so hard, relax and enjoy it. I had this problem at first as well.
+1

This seems to be a common problem. It seems to only occur on the right side. However, most reports (me included) find it subsides after a couple 1000 kms of breakin.

My guess is the master brake cylinder on the right side of the bar raises the "moment of inertia" enough that the bar vibrates down into the range of human perception. Add even more mass to the right side could eliminate this - I had the rheostate control of my heated grips added to that side and it then solved the problem.

Two other tricks I do:
1) I often use my throttle lock.
2) I alternate my finger positioning on the levers if my hand starts to feel fatigue - change form fingers [#1 & #2] to [#2 and #3].
 

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Hold the throttle like it were a bird. Hold it too tightly it will suffocate, but hold it too loosely, it will fly away.

Best practice is to hold it like you're just resting your hands on the handlebar and not grabbing on. The throttle can be turned by just a mere light friction from your palm and doesn't need to be held tight. This will come naturally as you get more riding time.

Also, ever rode a horse? Try concentrating on pressing your knees against the tank to stay mounted instead of just relying on your hands.

Stay loose with the upper body. It's better to absorb the shocks by having a less rigid posture. Move your upper body slightly forward in relation to your hips, elbows bent with wrists straight and the bumps won't be jarring to your body, shoulders, elbows and wrists.

You're a little tense right now and also rigid. Try to relax, be smooth and experiment. Make the bike do all the work. It only needs your inputs at the controls. You shouldn't be fighting just to stay mounted on the bike.
 

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Options: grips, throttle lock, new bar.
Try the knees on tank, I alternate with this.
Place your knuckles up (middle knuckle) this has helped me. Given the bar bends into you.

Also, rotating the bar foward a little can help ralax.

My hands sometimes hurt in traffic/commuting. Hardly ever on the back roads.
 

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segue00 said:
Hold the throttle like it were a bird. Hold it too tightly it will suffocate, but hold it too loosely, it will fly away.

Best practice is to hold it like you're just resting your hands on the handlebar and not grabbing on. The throttle can be turned by just a mere light friction from your palm and doesn't need to be held tight. This will come naturally as you get more riding time.

Also, ever rode a horse? Try concentrating on pressing your knees against the tank to stay mounted instead of just relying on your hands.

Stay loose with the upper body. It's better to absorb the shocks by having a less rigid posture. Move your upper body slightly forward in relation to your hips, elbows bent with wrists straight and the bumps won't be jarring to your body, shoulders, elbows and wrists.

You're a little tense right now and also rigid. Try to relax, be smooth and experiment. Make the bike do all the work. It only needs your inputs at the controls. You shouldn't be fighting just to stay mounted on the bike.
That is the best worded instructions I have ever read.
:beer

Almost makes me think that the infamous vibration that so many of us experienced during our break-in period had NOTHING to do with the bike. It was just us riders choking the little bird - until we eventually learned to relax.

:popcorn
 
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