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Discussion Starter #1
Well I just had the first service performed on my CBR and am still actively trying to sell my Ninja....To better compare the two, I took out my Ninja for the first time since buying the CBR.....so for all u tru newbs this maybe useful

The most obvious thing when I first sat down on the Ninja was its riding position. I was very much upright which I realized much more after having ridden the CBR. I thought to myself this position would be much more conducive to one learning to ride. I am also able to to get both feet flat on the ground with the 500R, where as on the CBR I'm not completely able to get my feet flat. However, this is partly due to the fact that i'm relatively short (5'5) so this may not be a problem for others, but nonetheless, initially this would be important when first learning.

Performance wise...woah, what a world of a difference. Today I truly realized the difference between 50 vs 95-100 horsepower. I also gained appreciation for just how sensitive the throttle is on the 600. I could comfortably twist back the throttle all the way on the 500R without much trepidation, whereas on the 600 you really need a nice stretch of pavement to think of doing it (at least for me). I found myself having to downshift more often on the 500R to get more usable power, whereas on the 600 even in the lower rev ranges if you open the throttle up, the bike will go.

Cornering wise, the CBR is much more willing to lean over in the corner...this maybe a subjective feeling, but the bike did feel more stable when leaned over...this is probably due to better tires, suspension, etc.

The brakes are also impressively more responsive on the CBR. The CBR has dual discs on the front whereas the 500R has only a single disc. The 500R required significant more brake lever pressure to produce the same amount of stopping power as compared to the CBR.

In short, everything that makes new 600cc bikes what they are today (a blast to ride, race track ready) are what makes them poor choices for beginner bikes. The whole form vs function argument really does come to light when riding both bikes. I took what others had to say at face value when I was choosing a good bike to learn on, but after having ridden both back to back, I can say that the advice given here is solid. Sorry for the long post guyz!
 

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everything u said about the 500 is pretty true. the only thing is i think the 500 Ninja is very easy to get leaned over but thats imo. also, how do you think the power is on the Ninja when you have it at 8,000+ RPM. Both by itself and compared the the F4i. :)
 

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TRocket said:
everything u said about the 500 is pretty true. the only thing is i think the 500 Ninja is very easy to get leaned over but thats imo. also, how do you think the power is on the Ninja when you have it at 8,000+ RPM. Both by itself and compared the the F4i. :)
Ur right, the 500 is easy to lean over, my comment was that I felt more comfortable doing it on the CBR.

In terms of the power after 8000 rpm, I defintely felt that it was adequate, but my view is a bit jaded after riding the F4i. I find that I can be at full throttle in the "powerband" on the 500r, whereas i rarely ever use full throttle in the powerband on the CBR.

All in all, i'm glad i learned the basics on the 500 and if i could afford it I would defintely keep it as a second bike.
 
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