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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's some of the latest, most current information from the NHTSA on motorcycle fatalities/motorcycle licenses.

"Some insight into the Recent Increases in Motorcyclist Fatalities"
http://www.nhtsa.gov/portal/nhtsa_s...es/DOT/NHTSA/NCSA/Content/PPT/2008/811031.pdf

"Fatally Injured Motorcycle Operators by License Status"
http://www.nhtsa.gov/portal/nhtsa_s...DOT/NHTSA/NCSA/Content/RNotes/2008/810892.pdf

It looks like the cruiser guys, especially the over forty crowd, are slowly becoming the statistical norm in motorcycle fatalities. Maybe they'll start wearing helmets now?

Also, WTF is up with 36% of Oklahoma motorcycle fatalities not having a valid motorcycle license?! It's pretty scary, that's what. How did your states do?


There's a couple of more articles here:
Latest Releases | National Highway Traffic Safety Administration(NHTSA) | U.S. Department of Transportation

if you're interested in that kind of stuff.
 

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Hardass!
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Nice stats.

There are a nice fat number of unlicensed riders in the motorcycle world-that has alot to do with alot-I wonder how many unlicensed riders we have here...
Wow the liter bikes took the cake...
 

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Wow. Most of those stats were pretty useless as far as drawing conclusions, i.e., are we getting safer per vehicle mile traveled, etc. The right numbers are there, but they aren't combined in meaningful ways.

The numbers are there, but the presentation doesn't note them. Facts like "motorcycle crashes as percentage of vehicle accidents" is useless without comparing it to number of motorcycles on the road vs other vehicles. I.e. motorcycle crashes could increase from 5% to 10% of all vehicle crashes, but if they also went from 5% to 20% of all vehicle miles traveled I'd say that's an improvement.

It's kind of amazing. They go through so much effort to gather all these stats and then don't spend the 10 minutes to get meaningful information out of them.
 

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Nice stats.

There are a nice fat number of unlicensed riders in the motorcycle world-that has alot to do with alot-I wonder how many unlicensed riders we have here...
Wow the liter bikes took the cake...
From polls we've done in the past on SBN, we do have quite a few unlicensed riders.

Most 'liter bikes' are actually 999cc and below. The stats list the highest increase in displacements from 1001cc-1500cc. Probably mostly cruisers. Would be interesting to see another breakdown of 1501cc and above.

This study really needs to differentiate between large sport bikes and large cruisers. They correlate the highest risk as being older riders on larger bikes.
Which bikes? Which riders? Many older riders are in fact new riders or returning riders getting on big cruisers.
 

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Are we not men?
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Wow. Most of those stats were pretty useless as far as drawing conclusions, i.e., are we getting safer per vehicle mile traveled, etc. The right numbers are there, but they aren't combined in meaningful ways.

The numbers are there, but the presentation doesn't note them. Facts like "motorcycle crashes as percentage of vehicle accidents" is useless without comparing it to number of motorcycles on the road vs other vehicles. I.e. motorcycle crashes could increase from 5% to 10% of all vehicle crashes, but if they also went from 5% to 20% of all vehicle miles traveled I'd say that's an improvement.

It's kind of amazing. They go through so much effort to gather all these stats and then don't spend the 10 minutes to get meaningful information out of them.
They aren't necessarily meant to be meaningful numbers. They are there for the insurance industry and the fear-mongers to flash around and scare people who don't know better.
 

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I'm Quiet
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That first one seems to agree with what I've been seeing and that's an increase in older guys on big cruisers out bar hopping.
 

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Silent pipes take lives
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They aren't necessarily meant to be meaningful numbers. They are there for the insurance industry and the fear-mongers to flash around and scare people who don't know better.
Except for the fact that if the numbers were presented in a more meaningful way, they'd actually be more scary. Why? Because motorcycle miles traveled are significantly fewer than automobile miles traveled. Straight up numbers are only directly comparable when the miles and types of roads traveled are the same.

Nice try, though.
 

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Silent pipes take lives
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That the registrations and fatalities trend together suggests that newer riders are a significant part of the motorcycle fatality statistics. It could also be argued that it's due in part to experienced riders getting used to a new bike, but usually riders don't change much from what they're used to. Fat Boy riders generally don't trade for MV Agustas and vice versa.
 

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Silent pipes take lives
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Hmmmm...looking through the first link there actually is useful data.

Page 9 shows a motorcyclist fatality rate of 39 per 100 million miles traveled in 2006. Looking elsewhere, FARS shows the overall motor vehicle fatality rate for the same year as being 1.42 per 100 million miles traveled. Of course, that number includes motorcycles, so it would be even lower if you only count cars, trucks, SUVs, etc.

Those are very useful numbers and show that, at least in 2006, motorcycles were ~27.5 times more deadly than motor vehicles in general.

It's interesting to note that drinking a beer or two is responsible only for about 8% of those who died. 65% of the fatalities are sober riders.

This only supports my previous assertion that it isn't drinking lightly before riding which is the most stupid, but rather that the decision to ride in the first place is far more stupid from a death-avoidance standpoint.

It would be helpful to know, however, what the miles traveled slightly drunk versus sober look like. That would shed some light on the 8% and 27% figures. If less than 8% of miles traveled are done so in the lightly intoxicated category, then the increase is worse than it appears. Same for the heavily intoxicated category.

If we were smart, we wouldn't ride at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If we were smart, we wouldn't ride at all.
Haha, so true. After looking at all of the stats, though, it just keeps looking like it's safer and safer for me to ride. I don't ride drunk (I don't ride even with one beer in me), I have a motorcycle license, I am under 30 years old, and my bike has only 649cc's.

Even though it seems like the squidly sportbikers would be the ones making the statistics, it's seeming more and more that the uneducated harley riders are the ones setting the standard.
 

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Apprentice wheelieist
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Looks like Florida managed to be #1 in the country in motorcycle fatalities despite being waaaay behind California in population. I blame the "helmets optional" law.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
...you know what they say about statistics...
It's a mathematical science pertaining to the collection, analysis, interpretation or explanation, and presentation of data?
thanks wikipedia
 

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A co-worker just purchased a 2007 FatBoy after completing his motorcycle safety course...He has only 3 days of riding experience and no safety gear, his helmet offers less protection than a bicycle helmet. He is riding with a group of guys that are a bad influence. I have tried to share my advice/exp with him but all he can say is that I am nuts for riding a "crotch rocket" ;-( ...I can only pray that he gets scared and sells that bike...But then I am almost 40 and have a livelong love affair with sportbikes...ATGATT
 

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That the registrations and fatalities trend together suggests that newer riders are a significant part of the motorcycle fatality statistics. It could also be argued that it's due in part to experienced riders getting used to a new bike, but usually riders don't change much from what they're used to. Fat Boy riders generally don't trade for MV Agustas and vice versa.
disagree, I myself and several others moved from cruisers to sportbikes, while several on here have moved from sportbikes to crusers.

I think we need a pole of our own.
 

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Silent pipes take lives
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disagree, I myself and several others moved from cruisers to sportbikes, while several on here have moved from sportbikes to crusers.

I think we need a pole of our own.
Except that the statistics on the average motorcycle fatality's amount of riding experience agrees with my prediction. Just because you "know some guys" doesn't mean that most motorcycle fatalities are due to someone moving from one type of motorcycle to a completely different type.

Newer riders are far more likely to die in a wreck. Only you would try to claim otherwise.
 

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Ride Naked
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Looks like Florida managed to be #1 in the country in motorcycle fatalities despite being waaaay behind California in population. I blame the "helmets optional" law.
Yeah, the "helmets optional law" combined with a large concentration of idiot cagers... combined with a large concentration of idiot riders. From what I've seen, an overwhelming number of riders down here can't ride worth a $#!%. The fact that 99% of our roads are perfectly flat and straight allows for people (the ones who aren't into educating themselves and trying to improve their skills; read: MOST) to ride for years without ever actually LEARNING TO RIDE. As soon as something goes wrong, their boned. Combine that with all the tourists, old people, and idiot kids in their cages on overpopulated roads, and it's a dangerous mix. Speaking of our crappy roads and idiot cagers; I also believe that the flat straight roads cause most cagers to feel they can get away with paying less attention to driving and more attention to texting, etc. It's real easy to drive here using just your peripheral vision to watch for a car ahead of you stopping. Unfortunately, bikes don't show up in said peripheral nearly as well as a car does.
 
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