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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well I am finally back on a bike for the first time in about 6 years. I have had several different bikes over the years and have recently purchased my second sport bike. My first was an 84 GPZ550, which I really enjoyed, however sold it years ago. This past week I picked up a 98 ZX6E and have been going over the bike to get familiar with it. I have been doing a bit of research on sprocket set ups and chains, will probably go with either a 15/50 or a 14/48 set up, and a new chain. Well anyway, to get to my question, while doing all of this reading on new chains, I started to wonder how do you know if your chain is adjust properly? If there is a thread that already covers this, please let me know. Although I have had other bikes, I do not consider myself a bike mechanic and as the old saying goes, a little knowledge can be a dangerous thing...:boink

Here's a pic of the new ride...
 

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how do you know if your chain is adjust properly

This is easy.
Place bike on center stand.
Pull out instructions manual usually located under the seat. If you can't find it don't worry.

OK sit next to the bike and slowly spin the rear wheel while with free hand feeling the chian.....much the same way your doctor checks to see if you have a hernia. Kind of push it up and down a little. You'll eventually find the "tight" spot. All chains have them. If yours doesn't it means your chain was well taken care of and the spot is there but not evident.

OK once the tight spot is found you want the chain to have anywhere from an inch to an inch and a quarter of play from the top to the bottom.

It's not hard. Also be very careful adjusting your chain. 1/4th of a turn is more than enough so you want to adjust by very very small increments.

OK? Now go out and have fun! And don't worry it's not that hard.
Have faith in your self! And great looking bike! i have it's b***** brother the 1100 GPQ
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, I'll have to check it after she's cooled down. Step outside after leaving my original post, damn it was such a nice day and since they were calling for rain all day, it sure didn't look like it then and I was gone. Just got back so I'll go and check it later. Wow I really love this bike. Very responsive, however, I am really leaning toward swapping out the front sprocket. Would just like more torque on the bottom end.
 

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The correct chain slack is different for different bikes and should be documented in your owner's manual. If you don't have one, get either an owner's manual or a service manual for your bike; you should be checking the chain slack every 600 miles (or less, depending on the chain). If the chain gets too loose, it can fall off and lock the rear wheel; a misadjusted chain is also more likely to break, which can be even more hazardous (to both your health and your bike's).
 

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It varies from bike to bike but a general rule for sportbikes seems to be push up on the bottom of the chain in the middle. It should just barely not touch the swingarm. Also better to be a little loose then too tight.
+1
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well I check out the chain tonight, but was unable to locate the "tight spot" shah reffered to, however the chain does have about an 1" of free play up and down. There is als about a 1/4" of space between the chain, when press up, and the plastic chain guard on the bottom of the swing arm. Thanks for the direction, as the bike did not come with an owners manual, but now that I have an idea of how it should be, I'll keep an eye on it. I will have to order an owners manual this weekend or pick up a repair manual. Thanks again.
 
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