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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all , Im getting a virago 750 for my first bike . not having to pay but a couple hundred for it , im thinking it will be a decent first bike . If im doing real good ill have to get me a new sv650s or gsxr(not sure which one i want) next year . well see .Curious, even if i start on a virago , should i still get a ninja 250/500 before moving to a gsxr600? . anyone use a virago style bike for their first ?if so im just wondering if you had any tips on learning to ride . Ive only rode a bike a couple times and i plan on taking a class in the next month or so . anyway can wait to ride

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I'd say to take the MSF course before you buy a bike. You'll be more informed and have more insight as to what bike is right for you after you understand basic operation of a motorcycle. But if you need to jump on it b/c it's such a good deal, that's understandable. Make sure it's in decent condition though... why are you getting it so cheap? Are you going to have to turn around and dump a grand into it after you get it? Is it safe to ride?

I learned to ride on a 450 cruiser, and looking back on it, I think it was a good bike to start with.

Going from the Virago to a GSXR600 is going to be quite a leap though. They are completely different machines. The SV might be a better choice, after you master the basics on whatever you start with. Keep in mind that you'll need more than one season to really master the basics.. at least two would be better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks. im getting the bike from a friend. i could probably have it for free but i want to give him something, its in pretty good shape ,my bud also ride goldwings , although those arent for me , to big , like a giant scooter :) . If it werent for that id like to start with a 250 ninja, sure i know what your saying about taking the coarse , no sence in even getting a bike without knowing about them , although ive rode the virago . 2 seasons , thanks for the tip , i will have to wait , see if im a natural :) kidding . thanks for the tips , i appreciate the insight.
 

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A couple hundred is a good deal for a Virago as they usually hold their resale pretty well. I still see them in good condition in the $700-1,000 range around here in the Spring/Summer. They hold their resale about as well as the Honda Shadows which is pretty much the Gold Standard for Japanese cruisers. Power Cruisers (V-Max,ZL900/1000,V65 Magna,etc.) of course have their own set of resale values due to them still having their own perspective "Cult" followings.

The Viragos were HUGE in the 80's,they were everywhere and a few of my friends had them. They don't really do any one thing well except for well CRUISING,which is just fine for what most of the people wanted them for. Yamaha made a killing with those bikes and about the closest thing they have to it now is the V Star 650.

I can say this about them they seem to be able to take a lot of abuse and keep on going! If you knew my friends you would understand why I say that!
 

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sjatm941 said:
Ive only rode a bike a couple times and i plan on taking a class in the next month or so . anyway can wait to ride

sjatm941 said:
no sence in even getting a bike without knowing about them , although ive rode the virago . 2 seasons , thanks for the tip , i will have to wait , see if im a natural :) kidding

You really need at least two seasons of frequent riding on your own machine in as many different weather, road & traffic conditions as possible to really gain useful experience. I can't tell if you understand that, by your posts above, so I just thought I'd point it out. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
acalliste said:
You really need at least two seasons of frequent riding on your own machine in as many different weather, road & traffic conditions as possible to really gain useful experience. I can't tell if you understand that, by your posts above, so I just thought I'd point it out. :)
haha , i do understand what YOU are saying. i live in wa state so in two years im sure to get tested very well. thanks for your advise.

by the way - im 35 , have a wife and 3 daughters - i do not intend on leaving this earth early , my kids need me .


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Cool. Some people do think that riding their friend's bike for one day constitutes riding for
a season
, so I had to make sure. :lao :eek:nfloor
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
acalliste said:
Cool. Some people do think that riding their friend's bike for one day constitutes riding for
a season
, so I had to make sure. :lao :eek:nfloor

I know. ive read alot on this forum the past couple weeks .

some people would even give a rip what advise you give em and get a race bike anyway. huh

im here to hear and heed advise from people who have gone thru what im going to go thru.

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
acalliste said:
Sounds like you are off to a good start. :cheers[/QUOTE


thanks miss

Now that we have the BS out of the way - if someone actually has advise on my original post , this has been taken way off what it intended . im curious about advise on the virago as a first bike and should i ride it for a year then move to a ninja 250 for a while(couple years) or just stick with the virago for a couple years . I KNOW NOT TO BUY OR GET OR RIDE A RACE BIKE FOR A COUPLE YEARS I NEED TO LEARn FIRST. Before going to a gsxr. IM also told a sv650s would be a good learning bike .


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I guess you must not have read this BS:

acalliste said:
I learned to ride on a 450 cruiser, and looking back on it, I think it was a good bike to start with.

Going from the Virago to a GSXR600 is going to be quite a leap though. They are completely different machines. The SV might be a better choice, after you master the basics on whatever you start with. Keep in mind that you'll need more than one season to really master the basics.. at least two would be better.
 

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Hey if you are getting the bike free/cheap don't pass it up. Even if you intend to move on to sportbikes, it'll teach you clutch and throttle control, braking with both front and rear brakes, and balance. Plus riding is riding, and riding something is better than nothing. Sit tight on your bike and have some fun with it, keeping an eye out for your next bike the whole while. That way when you spot someone needing to sell their Ninja 250 NOW, you can jump on the deal. And hey, if you decide you don't want to do the riding thing anymore, you can easily sell the Virago for no or little loss.

About jumping onto a GSRX600 after the Virago, I'd advise against it. Sure you can do it, and probably do it without seriously hurting yourself, but the two biggest changes you'll have to deal with are the change in riding position and change in power. Going from a feet-forward cruiser to even a straight up-and-down standard is very strange at first, never mind going to a full-on racing position. Then on top of that you throw in the blistering horsepower, razor sharp brakes and handling, and ability to wheelie, and it's a whole new riding experience. I had the chance to ride my friend's cruiser a while back (V-Star 650), and the change in seating was a shock to me. This was moving down from a 100 hp bike to the pitiful 650 V-twin that is the V-Star; going the other direction would have been much more difficult as far as clutch and throttle control.

Since you're older in your years, I'm betting you're established financially, such that spending $3000 for a transition bike then reselling it for a slight loss later on down the road isn't a big deal. If you've been reading here you'll hear lots of people reason that they "don't want to buy a bike then just sell it later on, I'll just get the 600 SS to start with and grow into it.", or "I can't afford to throw money away on a bike I'll only keep for a year." Mostly young people who don't have a lot of money are the ones saying this. It's a whole lot of crap though, considering the great resale value of just about any starter/smaller displacement bike you can think of.

After many miles on the Virago, I'd say you can take you pick of ANY non-SS bike and do excellent with the transition, be it SV650S, FZ6, Hornet 599, or even larger standard/sport touring bikes like the FJR1300. If you happen upon a Ninja 250 for a great price, jump on that too, you won't regret it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
acalliste said:
I guess you must not have read this BS:

Oh , i did read it ,then i responded and you responded with the 2 year bit .

others have advise too , that all.

i give up
 

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Honey, no one is stopping others from advising. But if you choose to call advice others give "BS", you may find that there will be no advice to heed.

Keep in mind that the 2 year bit was the part of my advice you chose to respond to.

I am just trying to help.
 

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KH, Rest In Peace Brother
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A couple of seasons on the Virago wouldn't be bad. How many miles have you roughly logged so far on it?

Jumping from a cruiser type bike to sportbike is going to be a shock to your system and depending on your learning curve can be difficult.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
OFFICER737 said:
A couple of seasons on the Virago wouldn't be bad. How many miles have you roughly logged so far on it?

Jumping from a cruiser type bike to sportbike is going to be a shock to your system and depending on your learning curve can be difficult.
Do i have the right to remain silent ? :)

couple miles logged , illegally :banana
guess ill just have to seek out a ninja 250 as well , learn both bikes . enjoy for the next couple years , see if i really want a race bike in a few years .

they sure are nice looking though.
 

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KH, Rest In Peace Brother
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sjatm941 said:
Do i have the right to remain silent ? :)

couple miles logged , illegally :banana
guess ill just have to seek out a ninja 250 as well , learn both bikes . enjoy for the next couple years , see if i really want a race bike in a few years .

they sure are nice looking though.


1st Ammendment cover ya :eek:nfloor

Another big difference you will notice is braking. With dual rotors on the front and most going to over 300mm rotors and top grade pads the SS bikes will stop on a dime and give you a nickle and 4 pennies back! A shorter wheelbase and taller riding position is different also. Then you have the issues with wind blast as most windscreens on a SS bike are almost purely cosmetic. Power to weight ratios are very different as well. Man this list could go on :eek:nfloor
 

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You will be missed Shawn
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There is nothing wrong with a virago as a first bike, and I would advise you, also, to pick up the two fifty. You could ride either one for any length of time, however, the 250 is more sb oriented so it would be closer (and I'm being very liberal with this) to a SS bike than the Virago is. However, with either one, you would be able to learn the basics at least.
 

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You will be missed Shawn
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kinda what I was thinking as well, but I didn't say anything because I didn't want to digress from the original post and take a chance of being way off of what was intended.
 
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