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Okay, first off I don't own a bike. I don't even have a license yet. I'm very interested in getting both, however. I've talked a little bit to a couple people who ride or at least know about bikes, and they both said that it would be best to start out on an older 500 or 600cc bike, so I don't die basically. Right now all I'm doing is research. It will be at least 6 months, if not a full year, before I get a bike. If anyone could give me some tips, or even some bikes they'd recommend I'd be more than happy to do the research myself and get some knowledge under my belt so I can come back and have a little basic knowledge to discuss pros and cons, prices, etc. Thanks much.
 

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so I don't die basically.

Stupidest way to look at it in my opinion. I can die eating this tuna sandwich right now. Everyone and their mother on this forum is gonna say start on a 250. You can easily die on that too. Get whatever is comfortable & doesn't feel intimidating.
 

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First off, research MSF courses, gear, insurance rates for different companies in your area.

Then, figure out what kind of riding do you want/need to do.

Finally, if you still feel the need to figure out what bike you want and you still haven't had a clue how to narrow it down, i think it would be best to hold off on a new bike until you do.

And this "don't die" concept based on what you ride is a load of crap. There are more factors than what you ride. Like computer support, >80% of computer related problems are a result of human error. Research that up by reading over the new rider threads and seeing the many questions you have yet to ask, be asked and answered by riders who have come through before you.
 

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#1 Get a permit. You'll learn general riding rules on the streets and make u legal. See if one of your buddies will let u practice on theirs(if they got something easy enough to ride) have them supervise and coach u a bit in a large open parking lot.
I learned on my bro's gsxr600 and I also taught my boy on a gsxr600. *btw, if you're not very tall like me, gsxr's are very confortable and forgiving on the throttle in my opinion.
As far as the bike to pick, yes, it would be smart to start with smaller as possible and old as possible. Any rider will tell you that, BUT have all of us taken that route? I didn't! lol it's all your expectation. If you believe what they say, "sooner or later you'll go down" and expect it to happen, then most definitely will happen. What do you want out of riding? And make a decision, but MAKE a decision. Contemplate too much you'll only wuss out and listen to EVERYBODY that are telling you it will only kill you. And EVERYBODY who don't ride will tell you that, trust me.

Any questions, hit me up anytime. I'd be happy to give you advice.
 

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Welcome.

You are best to start off on a used 250 or 500. They cost less, insurance is cheaper, they don't make you want to cry as much if you drop them, their ergos and controls are more beginner-friendly, and they facilitate learning, which equates to faster learning.

Read the stickies in the new riders section here, get your permit, and take the MSF course in the 6 mos to 1 year between now and actually buying a bike. You'll learn a lot and have a much better idea what bike to look at for your first one.

Stupidest way to look at it in my opinion. I can die eating this tuna sandwich right now. Everyone and their mother on this forum is gonna say start on a 250. You can easily die on that too. Get whatever is comfortable & doesn't feel intimidating.
You can die doing anything. However, your chances of dying are greater doing some things than others.

Do you honestly think there is an equal chance of dying (or getting hurt or just wadding up your new toy) on a liter super bike as there is on a Ninja 250?
 

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You can die doing anything. However, your chances of dying are greater doing some things than others.

Do you honestly think there is an equal chance of dying (or getting hurt or just wadding up your new toy) on a liter super bike as there is on a Ninja 250?
Riding is honestly dangerous. That's why it's not for everyone. But personally, it's that on the edge feeling that is part of why it's so great to ride. Every time I have a near death experience, (riding or not) I come out appreciating life and just want to love everyone while I'm here on this earth. And you have another one hell of a story to tell!
 

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In Kodiak, I'd recommend either a Kawasaki KLR, if you're going offroad, or something in the "adventure bike" line like a Suzuki V-Strom 650 or Kawasaki Versys. You're not going to get a lot of use out of a sport bike up there.

KeS
 

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You don't have to die to ruin your day....even a minor crash can lead to an expensive hospital visit not to mention messing up your bike. Why not stack the odds in your favor by 1) getting a noob friendly bike 2) getting proper training and 3) buying AND wearing proper gear.
 

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You don't have to die to ruin your day....even a minor crash can lead to an expensive hospital visit not to mention messing up your bike. Why not stack the odds in your favor by 1) getting a noob friendly bike 2) getting proper training and 3) buying AND wearing proper gear.
Riding is risky but to me, there are worse things than dying.

First Crash/Gravel.....Paralyzed : Suzuki GSX-R Motorcycle Forums: Gixxer.com

I'll start by saying I've been riding dirt bikes for 20 years and street for 11. I am an experienced, cautious rider. Back in January, I was on my way to work when I came across some gravel mid corner. There was too much to avoid so I had to stand the bike up, hit the brakes, and slide off the road into the grass (no big deal right?). I ended up going down an embankment and landing on my left side at impact. I was in full gear, as always, and didn't have a scratch on me. However, I hit at just the right angle to break my back, shattering my T6 vertebrae and severing my spinal cord. I'm now paralyzed from the chest down.

I had two rods and eight screws put in my back and was in rehab for two months. With tremendous support from friends, my church family, the community, and lots of people I didn't even know, my wife and I have come a long way in learning how to live life differently now. I went back to work in June. We had to get a new car, '09 vw gti, so it could be modified with hand controls. Paddle shifting a turbo charged hatchback isn't too bad :). I'm going to have to sell my bagged toyota pickup though since its a manual transmission and there's no room for my wheelchair.

As for the bike, it only has cosmetic damage. The frame, suspension, wheels, motor, etc. is still in good shape since it just slid through the grass. I planned on modifying it so that two wheels (landing gear) would drop down with a switch on the handlebars and hold the bike upright when I would come to a stop. Then when I take off, I could hit the switch and raise them back up and still be able to ride on two wheels like normal. There are lots of videos on youtube if you're interested. However, I was able to talk to a guy that had his bike modified like that and to make a long story short its just not going to be practical to ride on the street, he ended up selling his bike. So, I will probably end up getting a can am spyder (I know....I know). But, they come stock with button shifting on the handle bars and a reverse. Getting the brakes swapped to a lever on the bars, floor boards, and a wheelchair mount on the back and I'll be in business. The only downside is they are really expensive, even used ones are twice what I paid for my k6 1k. So it may be a while before I'm on two, or three, wheels again.

I'm going to need to replace a lot of parts to get my bike back together to sell it. My Dad has ridden it a handful of times to make sure the motor, brakes, suspension, steering etc. still work like they used to, and he said he couldn't tell a difference. .
Here is my bike before:



and here it is now, the mud was washed off after the pics and there was no damage to the other side of the bike:




Well, sorry for the novel but it's hard to sum up the last 9 months of your life in a few paragraphs. When I see guys doing wheelies through traffic on the interstate at triple digit speeds, its hard to accept that my life will never be the same from a low speed gravel accident on my commute to work. You always think it will never happen to you. I just want to encourage all of you to ride within your means, always be aware of whats around and ahead of you, and don't take anything (riding your motorcycle, or even being able to walk) for granted. Sometimes things happen that are beyond our control. There was nothing I could have done differently. It just turns out God's plans are different than mine, but I know things will get better and easier over time. I thought it would be important to share this though, hopefully it will help someone in some way. If you have any questions let me know.

Thanks

 
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