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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read a lot of negative advise to new riders here. Also, I hear a lot of them from my friends and co-workers. One funny example is this friend of mine. He used to ride and he had an '03 R6. I'd always go to him if I have questions about riding. But everytime he would ask me if I had dropped my bike yet, or crashed it, or close to dropping it. As if he wants me to have an accident or something. If you're giving an advise to a new rider, please say something encouraging. You are not in a position to judge anybody about their riding skills because you don't know them. If you had crashed when you're just learning how to ride, maybe share something that would prevent the "new rider" from crashing. You're taking out the "riding is awesome!" aspect of the entire experience.

For the new rider. The only person that could tell you what you can and cannot do is yourself. Some new riders are naturally talented and some are not. Some are smart, and some are confused. Some are sure of themselves and some are foolish. And some just got "b***** balls" than others. Take the MSF course, ask advise from experienced riders and always think about "SAFETY FIRST!"

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!
 

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Are we not men?
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In your example, it's not that your friend 'wants' you to have a wreck. The fact is that your mindset will change with a minor tip-over/get-off. Some people wonder if you've had the experience yet. It helps judge where your confidence or overconfidence level may be.

Yes, everyone is different but there are similarities and trends. The longer you ride, the easier they are to spot. This is one reason some of us will tell newbies that they don't know how much they don't know.

Then, one day, you are looking back and realize you didn't know a lot and others really were just trying to help.
 

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Clueless Newbie
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I'm going to second Old School Punk on some of this. We don't want anyone to get hurt, but the occasional near miss is a good reminder of our limits and teaches us the humility required to safely operate a motorcycle.

This summer, I was going pretty fast down a road in upstate New York. I headed over a hill, (apparently a stop sign warning was blocked), and as I got over it, I saw that the road ended, there was a river below, and a stop sign. Oh, and a bit of gravel in the road I'd need to break on.

I slam on the brakes. Relatively new bike for me; I go into a rear skid. Get the back wheel lined back up with the front, release, and keep leaning on the brakes. Stop three feet before the intersection.

Statistically, motorcycles are more dangerous than most other high-risk activities. Hang gliding, technical diving, kitesurfing, even racing on a track are statistically safer than riding on the street. The only thing out there that's more dangerous than motorcycles is BASE jumping. And those guys are crazy.

We wish you the very best. Please stay safe.
 

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Mediocre Strafer
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I've read a lot of negative advise to new riders here. Also, I hear a lot of them from my friends and co-workers. One funny example is this friend of mine. He used to ride and he had an '03 R6. I'd always go to him if I have questions about riding. But everytime he would ask me if I had dropped my bike yet, or crashed it, or close to dropping it. As if he wants me to have an accident or something. If you're giving an advise to a new rider, please say something encouraging. You are not in a position to judge anybody about their riding skills because you don't know them. If you had crashed when you're just learning how to ride, maybe share something that would prevent the "new rider" from crashing. You're taking out the "riding is awesome!" aspect of the entire experience.

For the new rider. The only person that could tell you what you can and cannot do is yourself. Some new riders are naturally talented and some are not. Some are smart, and some are confused. Some are sure of themselves and some are foolish. And some just got "b***** balls" than others. Take the MSF course, ask advise from experienced riders and always think about "SAFETY FIRST!"

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!
So you're judging the posters here because of their judgemental posts.

Nice. Let us know when you have something positive to contribute.

KeS
 

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Clueless Newbie
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Hmm. OP is a new rider on a 600cc bike. This is a good way to get trolled on SBN as well as many other forums. (More importantly, it unnecessarily increases your risk as a new rider).

I disagree with the way Kevin made his point, but kinda agree with his overall point.
 

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After Me Lucky Charms
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Awesome post! Now, let's review.

You join the military to fly a plane. You are a fast learner, have some experience in aerodynamic engineering. Ok! They will let you fly an F-22, with no simulator time. Solo, even!
 

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You go to buy a car... if you have the credit or the $$ at 16 with a drivers license you can purchase a Viper with twin turbo and any other mods you can think of. I am not saying it is a good idea but it is allowed. Same with bikes .... it may be better to start on a 250 but it is not required and it also does not mean the person that starts on a 600 has no chance. In fact it is not even best to start with a 250 if you want to be real about it. You should start with a dirtbike ... PW50 or whatever then move up slow then to a dual sport to start on the street.

Again I am not saying everyone that wants to start riding start on a 600 or 1k I am just saying that not many people do it the "best" way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
But every time this friend of mine ask me if I'd crashed yet, it gets to the point where I would tell him "I'm working on it" hoping that maybe that would shut him up. He insists that it will happen soon. I really don't have any time thinking about crashing on my bike right now because I'm still trying to learn how to corner properly. Maybe in the future when I get bored, I'll focus on how to crash and get some useful tips here.
 

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Clueless Newbie
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But every time this friend of mine ask me if I'd crashed yet, it gets to the point where I would tell him "I'm working on it" hoping that maybe that would shut him up. He insists that it will happen soon. I really don't have any time thinking about crashing on my bike right now because I'm still trying to learn how to corner properly. Maybe in the future when I get bored, I'll focus on how to crash and get some useful tips here.
So prove him wrong. Get some riding experience in. Learn how to take curves, how to deal with traffic, etc. etc. After a good three thousand miles, I think he'll change a bit.
 

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Mediocre Strafer
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But every time this friend of mine ask me if I'd crashed yet, it gets to the point where I would tell him "I'm working on it" hoping that maybe that would shut him up. He insists that it will happen soon. I really don't have any time thinking about crashing on my bike right now because I'm still trying to learn how to corner properly. Maybe in the future when I get bored, I'll focus on how to crash and get some useful tips here.
If you put 125/80 road race slicks on your bike, the wider rubber acts like frame sliders and holds the plastics off the ground when you crash. That's how the MotoGP guys do it.

KeS
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
So prove him wrong. Get some riding experience in. Learn how to take curves, how to deal with traffic, etc. etc. After a good three thousand miles, I think he'll change a bit.
Thanks dude. I don't need to prove anything to anybody. I just want to ride my bike that's all.
 

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If you want good advice then here ya go. Take classes. MSF advanced and sportbike classes are good. Find a good trackday organization that has class time. These things will help you learn to corner better in a safe way. Remember where you are at all the time..... if your on the street ride slower and safer... if your on the track ride faster and safer. The things you can learn from trackdays are great if you get in a bind and could save your arse but you should not ride the street like it is the track.

Get the twist of the wrist books and video. Those will help you alot before you ever go to the track or whatever.

Remember that your rear tire will not break traction easy so if you rev the engine and pop the clutch you will end up with your bike riding you.

Always pretrip your bike.

Wear your gear (because there is a very high (almost absolute) chance that at some point you will crash .... problem is you will not know in time to throw on gear)

Cars are b***** and they will win in a fight.

The front tire does the majority of the braking .... and all of the braking in an emergency (because the rear will be off the ground).

Smooth throttle.

Smooth brakes.

Smooth transition in turns.

Smooth.

Miles miles miles miles... there is no substitute for miles.
 

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Stop being so sensitive and do you what duck says.
 

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I've read a lot of negative advise to new riders here. Also, I hear a lot of them from my friends and co-workers. One funny example is this friend of mine. He used to ride and he had an '03 R6. I'd always go to him if I have questions about riding. But everytime he would ask me if I had dropped my bike yet, or crashed it, or close to dropping it. As if he wants me to have an accident or something. If you're giving an advise to a new rider, please say something encouraging. You are not in a position to judge anybody about their riding skills because you don't know them. If you had crashed when you're just learning how to ride, maybe share something that would prevent the "new rider" from crashing. You're taking out the "riding is awesome!" aspect of the entire experience.

For the new rider. The only person that could tell you what you can and cannot do is yourself. Some new riders are naturally talented and some are not. Some are smart, and some are confused. Some are sure of themselves and some are foolish. And some just got "b***** balls" than others. Take the MSF course, ask advise from experienced riders and always think about "SAFETY FIRST!"

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!
Words of "discouragement" are a shitty rider's way of making themselves feel superior ;)


There's a guy that I coach the MSF BRC with occasionally and I love working with him... he's a FRIKKIN RIOT!!! I've never met a more encouraging person in my life. The guy literally jumps up & down, claps and yells when a rider gets down a skill they've been having trouble with. I love it. :lao

It's rubbed off on me a little... I've been known to high five my students from time to time. :D

I see FAR more people learn easier & faster from someone who's optimistic than someone's who's pessimistic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
If you want good advice then here ya go. Take classes. MSF advanced and sportbike classes are good. Find a good trackday organization that has class time. These things will help you learn to corner better in a safe way. Remember where you are at all the time..... if your on the street ride slower and safer... if your on the track ride faster and safer. The things you can learn from trackdays are great if you get in a bind and could save your arse but you should not ride the street like it is the track.

Get the twist of the wrist books and video. Those will help you alot before you ever go to the track or whatever.

Remember that your rear tire will not break traction easy so if you rev the engine and pop the clutch you will end up with your bike riding you.

Always pretrip your bike.

Wear your gear (because there is a very high (almost absolute) chance that at some point you will crash .... problem is you will not know in time to throw on gear)

Cars are b***** and they will win in a fight.

The front tire does the majority of the braking .... and all of the braking in an emergency (because the rear will be off the ground).

Smooth throttle.

Smooth brakes.

Smooth transition in turns.

Smooth.

Miles miles miles miles... there is no substitute for miles.
Thank you sir! You're awesome!
 

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A lot depends on your attitude. I know I am more pessimistic around people who are very icky and.confident as new riders.... Hot heads as it were. (and no I am not saying you are or are not... I haven't been at the conversation between you too) but if he perceives you as such... I wouldn't be surprised by that type.of reaction.

There is a certain amount of mistake making that goes on as a newb. But no one wishes it on someone ese. Some people truly are negative people.... If you don't like it... Find a new.riding buddy and spend a lot of time learning how to ride. Educate yourself and ride many many miles. Keep and open mind -.you can learn something from almost anyone... Even of its a simple... I don't ever want to.do what that guy did lesson.

Enjoy your ride and don't hang around negative people.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
A lot depends on your attitude. I know I am more pessimistic around people who are very icky and.confident as new riders.... Hot heads as it were. (and no I am not saying you are or are not... I haven't been at the conversation between you too) but if he perceives you as such... I wouldn't be surprised by that type.of reaction.

There is a certain amount of mistake making that goes on as a newb. But no one wishes it on someone ese. Some people truly are negative people.... If you don't like it... Find a new.riding buddy and spend a lot of time learning how to ride. Educate yourself and ride many many miles. Keep and open mind -.you can learn something from almost anyone... Even of its a simple... I don't ever want to.do what that guy did lesson.

Enjoy your ride and don't hang around negative people.
Thanks I-Jo! But I don't have that attitude like you've described, I'm the complete opposite of it. I was expecting to learn from him but I don't. I've been teaching myself from the day I got my bike. Also, I've been trying to get other people to ride with me just to see how they handle corners but it hasn't happened yet. I ride every day to work and Saturday and Sunday. It makes my day fun and exciting!
 

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Your learning can only go so far when you are trying to teach yourself....Especially when most people are unable or unwilling to actually self critique accurately. After 30+ years of riding I still cannot always self critique accurately. I still go to others to make observatins of my riding and make suggestions or point out mistakes etc....video of yourself riding(if you know what is proper) is well worth watching. For the money.....Kieth Code is by far the best learning experience you could ever get. I have been through all 4 levels a couple times dating back to the 80's.....nothing is more comp-rehensive than what you will walk away from that school with, nothing.....

I would avoid the guy you mention as being so negative. He was probably hugged too much or too little as a kid.....lol
 
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